Spoken by some 500 million people around the world, Spanish is the main tongue of most of Latin America and Spain as well as the unofficial second language of California and the United States. By learning Spanish, you will increase your ability to understand the world and gain direct access to such cultural products as the writings of Cervantes, Sor Juana and Borges; the films of Pedro Almodóvar and Lucrecia Martel; the work of important critical theorists; and world-class music and gastronomy.

The Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures is the place to start or develop your Spanish skills. Our language program is the largest on campus, and we also teach multiple courses in literature, cinema, critical theory and food studies, plus courses aimed at the practical uses of Spanish in the health professions, business and law.

Our students take Maymester and summer courses in Mexico City and Oaxaca, Mexico; Havana,Cuba; Cusco, Peru; and Madrid and Santander, Spain. For longer stays, the USC Madrid Center welcomes students in the spring term, and you can also enroll in other programs in Argentina, Chile and Mexico. For all these reasons, Spanish may easily become a pleasurable and useful lifelong pursuit.

Courses

The terms indicated are expected but are not guaranteed. For the courses offered during any given term, consult the Schedule of Classes.

  • SPAN 120 Spanish I (4) For students with limited proficiency in Spanish. Practice in listening comprehension, oral communication, elementary reading and writing. Prerequisite: Spanish placement exam.

    SPAN 120 Spanish I (4) For students with limited proficiency in Spanish. Practice in listening comprehension, oral communication, elementary reading and writing. Prerequisite: Spanish placement exam.

    SPAN 150 Spanish II (4) Continuation of SPAN 120; increased emphasis on listening comprehension, oral communication, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 120.

    SPAN 220 Spanish III (4) Continuation of SPAN 150; intensive work in listening comprehension, oral communication, reading and writing, with emphasis on free expression; readings related to Hispanic culture and civilization. Prerequisite: SPAN 150.

    SPAN 240 Spanish IV (4, FaSp) Intensive review of Spanish grammar with emphasis on four skills. Audiovisual materials and readings related to Hispanic culture and civilization. Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

  • SPAN 270 Spanish for Native Speakers (4, FaSp) For speakers with an advanced level of oral proficiency, but no previous formal study of Spanish. Focus on grammar, spelling and punctuation, reading, and writing.

     

  • SPAN 290gp Introduction to Latin American and Iberian Studies (4) Introduction to the cultural history of Spain, Portugal and Latin America with a focus on literature and visual works from the early-modern period to the twenty-first century. Satisfies: New General Education in Category B: Humanistic Inquiry; and Global Perspective in Category H: Traditions and Historical Foundations.

    SPAN 375 Latin American Cultural and Literary Theory (4) (Enroll in COLT 375)
    Satisfies New General Education in B Humanistic Inquiry

    SPAN 380g Literature of Mexico (4) Principal writers and their works from Colonial times to the present. Non-majors may write assignments in English. Recommended preparation: advanced comprehension of oral and written Spanish. Satisfies New General Education in B Humanistic Inquiry

     

  • SPAN 231x Spanish for Business Communication: The Job Search (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; professional dossier, simulated job search, formal face-to-face job interview, and telephone job interview. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 232x Spanish for Business Communication: The Business (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; written company profiles and a critical analysis of an NGO presented orally to the class. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 233x Spanish for Business Communication: The Case Study (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; case studies analyzed and presented in writing and orally. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 250x Spanish for Business Communication (4) Four-skills language and culture course for intermediate-high Spanish students interested in Business/Communications. Prepares students to communicate in the Spanish-speaking commercial market in a linguistically sensitive manner. Not available for credit to Spanish majors and minors. Prerequisite: SPAN 240.

  • SPAN 231x Spanish for Business Communication: The Job Search (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; professional dossier, simulated job search, formal face-to-face job interview, and telephone job interview. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 232x Spanish for Business Communication: The Business (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; written company profiles and a critical analysis of an NGO presented orally to the class. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 233x Spanish for Business Communication: The Case Study (2) Four-skills language and culture course. Culminating tasks executed in Spanish; case studies analyzed and presented in writing and orally. Not open to Spanish majors. Not available for major credit to Spanish majors. (Duplicates credit in SPAN 250.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 240 Spanish IV (4, FaSp) Intensive review of Spanish grammar with emphasis on four skills. Audiovisual materials and readings related to Hispanic culture and civilization. Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 245 Spanish Through Social Issues in Costa Rica (4, Sm) (Costa Rica Summer Program only). Intensive review of Spanish grammar with emphasis on four skills. Audiovisual materials, guest speakers, and readings related to the history and culture of Costa Rica. Concurrent enrollment: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 250x Spanish for Business Communication (4) Four-skills language and culture course for intermediate-high Spanish students interested in Business/Communications. Prepares students to communicate in the Spanish-speaking commercial market in a linguistically sensitive manner. Not available for credit to Spanish majors and minors. Prerequisite: SPAN 240.

    SPAN 260 Advanced Spanish: Arts and Sciences (4, FaSpSm) Development of students’ oral and writing skills using literary and scientific materials; grammar review. (Duplicates credit in the former SPAN 266.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 261 Advanced Spanish: Society and the Media (4, FaSpSm) Analysis of cultural issues in the Spanish-speaking world. Discussions, presentations, writing assignments, and grammar instruction designed to improve students’ proficiency in Spanish. (Duplicates credit in the former SPAN 265.) Prerequisite: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 270 Spanish for Native Speakers (4, FaSp) For speakers with an advanced level of oral proficiency, but no previous formal study of Spanish. Focus on grammar, spelling and punctuation, reading, and writing.

    SPAN 280x Conversational Spanish (2, FaSp) Discussions of short films, cultural and literary texts and other activities designed to improve conversational skills. Not for credit for Spanish majors. Recommended preparation: SPAN 220.

    SPAN 290gp Introduction to Latin American and Iberian Studies (4) Introduction to the cultural history of Spain, Portugal and Latin America with a focus on literature and visual works from the early-modern period to the twenty-first century. Satisfies: New General Education in Category B: Humanistic Inquiry; and Global Perspective in Category H: Traditions and Historical Foundations.

  • SPAN 301 Introduction to Literature and Film (4, FaSpSm) Introduction to critical reading and interpretation of poetry, narrative fiction, drama, and film from Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: SPAN 260, SPAN 261.

    SPAN 302 Screen Cultures: From Film to the Internet (4, FaSpSm) A survey of Spanish and Latin American cinema from the silent film era to the present, acquainting students with various critical and theoretical approaches to cinema studies. Prerequisite: SPAN 260, SPAN 261; recommended preparation: SPAN 301.

    SPAN 304 The Art of Fiction (4, FaSp) A survey of Spanish and Latin American fiction from the Middle Ages to the present, acquainting students with various critical and theoretical approaches to narrative. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 306 Performance from Street to Stage (4, FaSp) A survey of Spanish and Latin American plays from the Middle Ages to the present, acquainting students with various critical and theoretical approaches to drama. Conducted in Spanish. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 305.) Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 308 The Art of Poetry (4, FaSp) A survey of Spanish and Latin American poetry from the Middle Ages to the present, acquainting students with various critical and theoretical approaches to verse. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 310 Structure of Spanish (4, FaSp) A systematic study of the structure of Spanish. Topics include fundamental aspects of the sound system; word classes; sentences and their meaning; linguistic change and variation; standard and colloquial usage. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 311 Advanced Spanish Through Contemporary Issues: Oral Emphasis (4, Sm) (Summer sessions abroad) Advanced Spanish with emphasis on grammar and oral communication. Recommended preparation: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261.

    SPAN 315 Advanced Grammar and Translation (4, FaSp) Contrastive study of Spanish and English structures designed to explore the similarities and differences between the two languages and to familiarize students with translation techniques. Emphasis on a variety of text types with the aim of increasing linguistic and cultural appreciation of the Spanish language. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 316x Spanish for the Professions (4, max 8, FaSp) The language and culture of a particular area of study or profession, such as medicine and healthcare, political and social sciences, business and the law. Limited to 4 units for major or minor credit. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 318x Creative Writing in Spanish (4) An introduction to the art and craft of creative writing in Spanish with a focus on narrative fiction; writing workshop, literary readings. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261

    SPAN 320 Politics, Thought, Society (4, FaSp) Introduction to the study of Iberian and Latin American cultural patterns through readings on such topics as history, gender, ethnicity, and politics. Conducted in Spanish. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 360 and former SPAN 370.) Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 321 Sounds, Images, Objects (4, FaSp) Introduction to the study of Iberian and Latin American cultural forms through readings on the visual arts, cinema, architecture and music. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 360 and former SPAN 370.) Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 341 Advanced Conversation and Culture (4) (Madrid Summer Program) Conversation based on study of Spanish art and architecture. Field trips.

    SPAN 350 Cultural Cross-Currents of the Iberian Middle Ages (4, FaSp) Selected readings from 1040 to 1499 examining the rich cultural diversity of the Iberian Middle Ages in the symbiosis of Christian, Moslem and Jewish traditions. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 377 and former SPAN 450.) Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 352 The Transatlantic Golden Age: New Worlds Real and Imagined (4, FaSp) Selected readings from 1500 to 1700 exploring Renaissance and baroque visions of the classical and new worlds. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 372 Modern and Contemporary Latin American Fiction (4, FaSp) Study of major trends in Latin American fiction from the 1930s to the present with a focus on narrative experimentation. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 373 Modern and Postmodern Spanish Fiction (4, FaSp) An exploration of the literary and filmic narratives of contemporary Spain focusing on the major historical and cultural movements of the 20th century. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 378.) Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 375 Latin American Cultural and Literary Theory (4) (Enroll in COLT 375)
    Satisfies New General Education in B Humanistic Inquiry

    SPAN 380g Literature of Mexico (4) Principal writers and their works from Colonial times to the present. Non-majors may write assignments in English. Recommended preparation: advanced comprehension of oral and written Spanish. Satisfies New General Education in B Humanistic Inquiry

    SPAN 381 Narco-World (4Sp) Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 382 The Aesthetics of Violence in Latin America (4Fa) An exploration of representations of violence and violent representations in Latin American narrative, poetry, music, and film. Recommended Preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 385 The Culture of Food in Hispanic Los Angeles (4, FaSp) Experiential learning and project-based course designed to familiarize students with the food culture of Hispanic Los Angeles. Students create Spanish language blogs about their experiences. Prerequisite: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261.

    SPAN 390 Special Problems (1-4) Supervised, individual studies. No more than one registration permitted. Enrollment by petition only.

    SPAN 391 Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Literature (USC Madrid Center) (4) Readings in contemporary Spanish literature. Includes lectures by recognized Spanish writers and scholars.

  • SPAN 405 History of the Spanish and Portuguese Languages (4) Development of sounds, forms, words, meanings and structures from their origins to modern Spanish and Portuguese. Prerequisite: SPAN 310 or SPAN 315.

    SPAN 412 Spanish Rhetoric and Style (4, FaSp) Close grammatical and rhetorical analysis of a variety of text types (general, literary, technical, journalistic) as the basis for practice in advanced written and oral expression as well as translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 310 or SPAN 315.

    SPAN 413m Social and Geographic Varieties of Spanish (4, Fa) Historical, social, and cultural elements represented in the dialectal diversity of the Spanish language; fieldwork in bilingual communities in the United States. Majors prepare assignments in Spanish, non-majors in English. Conducted in Spanish and English. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish.

    SPAN 420 Spanish Language Acquisition (4, FaSp) A study of the bilingual acquisition of Spanish and English by children, and of Spanish as a second language by adults; focus on linguistic, psychological and social factors. Prerequisite: SPAN 310 or SPAN 315.

    SPAN 442 Advanced Reporting in Spanish (4) (Enroll in JOUR 442)

    SPAN 455 Picaresque Itineraries: Empire and Its Discontents (4, FaSp) A study of the rise of the picaresque novel in Spain and Latin America as a medium for social, political, and cultural criticism. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 460 Don Quijote: Text and Film (4, FaSpSm) A close reading of Cervantes’ masterpiece and analysis of film adaptations of the novel. Prerequisite: SPAN 301.

    SPAN 462 Literary Cartographies of Latin America and Spain, 1810-1898 (4, FaSp) Comparative analysis of Spanish and Latin American literatures with a focus on trans-Atlantic relations and the rise of such movements as romanticism, realism, and modernismo. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 464 Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Theatre (4) (Madrid Center only) Historical evolution of the contemporary Spanish theatre; readings of dramatic texts supported by attendance at live stage performances. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 465 Cultural Perspectives of the Iberian Peninsula (4, Sm) (Madrid Summer Program) Study of cultural plurality in the Iberian Peninsula. Recommended preparation: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261.

    SPAN 466 Argentina, Society and the Arts (4, Sm) Study of the arts in the cultural landscape of Argentina and in the context of developments in Europe, Latin America and the United States. Recommended preparation: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261.

    SPAN 469 Immigration in Spain (4Sm) Sociopolitical issues of immigration in Spain, including economic impact, legal evolution, history, geographic location, and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 220. Recommended Preparation: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261.

    SPAN 470 Literature and Media in Latin America (4) (Enroll in COLT 470)

    SPAN 471 Postdictatorship Spanish and Latin American Cinema (4Fa) A study of the historical, cultural and political context of post-dictatorship Spanish and Latin American cinema by focusing on debates on memory and trauma. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 302.

    SPAN 472 The Sixties in Latin America (4Fa) Study of the explosive Latin American cultural formations of the sixties (literary boom, third cinema, protest song, theories of armed struggle). Prerequisite: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 481 Literature and Popular Culture (4, FaSp) An examination of popular culture and literary genres with an emphasis on the evolving canons and identities of Latin America and Spain. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 482 Literature and the City (4, FaSp) An examination of the literary representations of urban spaces and cultures within the context of Iberian, Latin American, and U.S. Latino societies. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 483 Gender and Sexuality (4, FaSp) An examination of gender, sexuality, and power in Iberian and Latin American literatures and cultures. Recommended preparation: SPAN 304 or SPAN 306 or SPAN 308.

    SPAN 484 Studies in Visual and Material Culture (4, FaSp) An examination of the role of visual and material culture in cultural and social context in the Hispanic world, focusing on a selected time period and geographical region. Recommended preparation: SPAN 260 and SPAN 261 if taken for Spanish major credit.

    SPAN 490x Directed Research (1-8, max 12) Individual research and readings. Not available for graduate credit.

    SPAN 495 Seminar for Majors and Minors (4) Two options: (1) Study of a major work or writer, a principal literary theme or movement; or (2) a selected topic in Spanish language and linguistics. Recommended preparation: two courses in the upper division in the same area as the seminar topic (e.g., language or literature).

    SPAN 499 Special Topics (2-4, max 8)

  • SPAN 341 Advanced Conversation and Culture (4) (Madrid Summer Program) Conversation based on study of Spanish art and architecture. Field trips.

    SPAN 465 Cultural Perspectives of the Iberian Peninsula (4, Sm) (Madrid Summer Program) Study of cultural plurality in the Iberian Peninsula. Recommended preparation: SPAN 260 or SPAN 261.

    SPAN 391 Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Literature (USC Madrid Center) (4) Readings in contemporary Spanish literature. Includes lectures by recognized Spanish writers and scholars.

     

  • SPAN 501 Cultural Narratives of Spain and Latin America (4) Theoretical and methodological approaches to cultural narratives in Spanish and Latin American literary and cultural studies.

    SPAN 511 Techniques and Procedures of Teaching Spanish as a Second Language (3) Practical classroom application of language teaching methods; evaluation of available textbooks; critique of master classes.

    SPAN 513 Spanish Morphology and Phonology (3, FaSp) A survey of research on the interaction between Spanish morphology and phonology in light of critical readings and discussion of selected studies as contributions to the general theory of grammar. (Duplicates credit in former SPAN 512. Crosslisted as LING-513)

    SPAN 514 Spanish Syntax (3, FaSp) A survey of Spanish syntax in the light of critical readings and discussion of selected studies and their comparative contribution to grammatical theory.

    SPAN 515 Spanish Grammar in Discourse (3, FaSp) Semantic and pragmatic approaches to the analysis of the structure of Spanish sentences and discourse.

    SPAN 516 Historical Aspects of Spanish and Portuguese (3, FaSp) Processes of language change in the development of the Spanish and Portuguese languages from their origin in spoken Latin to their modern stage.

    SPAN 517 Spanish Applied Linguistics (3, FaSp) Modern theories of first and second language acquisition and their application to Spanish.

    SPAN 518 Spanish Sociolinguistics (3, FaSp) Principles of sociolinguistics and dialectology: sociolinguistic patterns in the Hispanic languages.

    SPAN 525 Medieval and Early Modern Spanish World (4, max 8) Study of literature and other cultural artifacts pertaining to the Middle Ages in Spain and the early modern world in both Spain and the Americas.

    SPAN 529 The Transatlantic 19th Century (4, max 8) Study of authors, texts and literary and cultural currents in Spain and Latin America in the 19th century.

    SPAN 539 20th and 21st Century Spanish Literature and Culture (4, max 8) Study of cultural currents, authors, literary texts, films and other media in Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    SPAN 545 20th and 21st Century Latin American Literature and Culture (4, max 8) Study of cultural currents, authors, literary texts, films and other media in Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    SPAN 590 Directed Research (1-12) Research leading to the master’s degree. Maximum units which may be applied to the degree to be determined by the department. Graded CR/NC.

    SPAN 592 Practicum in Teaching Spanish (2) Approaches and techniques in the teaching of Spanish and/or Portuguese as a second language. Registration Restriction: Open only to Master and Doctoral students in Comparative Literature, Comparative Culture in Literature and Studies (Spanish and Latin American Studies), Linguistics (Hispanic Linguistics) and Spanish. Graded CR/NC.

    SPAN 594abz Master’s Thesis (2-2-0) Credit on acceptance of thesis. Graded IP/CR/NC.

    SPAN 596 Research Methods in Spanish Linguistics (3) Examination of various research methods as applied to the study of the Spanish language; mechanics of organizing, conducting and presenting research in Spanish linguistics.

  • SPAN 602 Seminar in Spanish and Latin American Critical Theory (4, max 8) Major developments in literary criticism in Spain and Latin America from the early modern period to the present.

    SPAN 603 Seminar in the Cultural History of Spain and Latin America (4, max 8) Literary and cultural currents in Spain and Latin America, with varying focus on genres, periods, movements and problems.

    SPAN 604 Seminar in Gender and Sexuality in Spain and Latin America (4, max 8) Construction and representation of gender and sexuality in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture.

    SPAN 606 Seminar in Visual Culture in Spain and Latin America (4, max 8) Major currents in film and other media in Spain and Latin America.

    SPAN 650 Topics in Spanish and Latin American Literature and Culture (4, max 8) Study of topics in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture across periods, genres and nations.

    SPAN 652 Seminar on a Major Topic in Hispanic Linguistics (3, max 9, FaSp) Analysis of selected topics of current interest as reflected primarily in the most recent literature.

    SPAN 672 Seminar in Spanish Morphophonology (3, max 9, FaSp) Selected topics in Spanish morphology and phonology.

    SPAN 674 Seminar on Spanish Syntax and Semantics (3, max 9, FaSp) Detailed analysis of topics in modern Spanish syntax and semantics.

    SPAN 676 Seminar in Diachronic Aspects of the Hispanic Languages (3, max 9, FaSp) In-depth analysis of a particular topic in the historical development of the Hispanic languages.

    SPAN 677 Seminar in Spanish Applied Linguistics (3, FaSp) Critical study and analysis of major issues related to the teaching and learning of Spanish as a first or a second language.

    SPAN 678 Seminar in Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3, max 9, FaSp) Selected topics in Hispanic sociolinguistics: social and geographic language varieties, language contact, discourse analysis, synchronic variation and processes of change in Spanish.

  • SPAN 700 Colloquium in Hispanic Literature and Linguistics (1, max 3) Discussion and presentation of papers on a variety of topics in the areas of Hispanic language and literature. Graded CR/NC. Prerequisite: any 600 level Spanish seminar.

    SPAN 790 Directed Research (1-12) Research leading to the doctorate. Maximum units which may be applied to the degree to be determined by the department. Graded CR/NC.

    SPAN 794abcdz Doctoral Dissertation (2-2-2-2-0) Credit on acceptance of dissertation. Graded IP/CR/NC.

     

Study Abroad

The Latin American and Iberian Cultures faculty encourages all students, especially majors and minors, to study in a Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking country.  Not only will your language skills significantly improve, you will acquire a firsthand knowledge of your host country’s culture.

The Department offers its own summer programs in Madrid and Santander, Spain.  In these programs, students live with families and take one or two courses with USC and/or local faculty.  The focus of the Santander program is basic language instruction.

Department faculty also lead various programs in other cities and countries including Brazil, Cuba, and Cusco-Lima (Peru), Granada-Marrakech (Spain and Morroco), and Mexico City and Oaxaca (Mexico).

USC Dornsife offers fall and summer programs at the USC Madrid Center.  Course offerings include “Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Theatre” and “Paintings in the Prado Museum,” which take advantage of the program’s location in Madrid.

Through the USC Dornsife Office of Overseas Studies, you can learn about semester or year programs in 29 countries, including several programs in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are of special interest to students of Spanish and Portuguese.

USC Dornsife also sponsors the Problems Without Passports program, which allows students to research societal challenges of a transnational or global nature.  In 2012, students in Anthropology 301, “The Global Performance of Healing,” traveled to Brasilia and Abadiana, Brazil, while those in International Relations 404, “International Policy Task Force: Rethinking U.S.-Cuban Relations,” studied in Washington and Miami as well as Havana.

Please refer to our Maymesters, Julymesters, and Past Programs pages to learn about upcoming and past study abroad programs.

Spain- Bilbao (Universidad de Deusto)

Founded in 1886, the Universidad de Deusto is located across the river from the famous titanium and glass Museo Guggenheim designed by Frank Gehry. The university has around 17,000 students and is small enough to nurture a friendly, relaxed atmosphere yet large enough to offer a wide range of courses and activities.

Spain-Madrid (Boston University-Fall Only)

Spain-Madrid (Boston University-Fall Only)

In this fall semester program, students are enrolled in the BU Madrid Spanish & European Studies program, which focuses on Spanish and European art, cinema, culture, history, literature, and politics. Students take four upper-division courses taught in Spanish. USC students may not take any courses taught in English.

Argentina- Buenos Aires (Universidad de San Andrés)

Argentina- Buenos Aires (Universidad de San Andrés)

The Universidad de San Andrés, located just a half hour from downtown Buenos Aires, is recognized as one of the most prestigious universities in Argentina and South America. UdeSA is a teaching and research university renowned for its research contributions on Latin America. The small nature of the university, with around 2,000 students, makes for a friendly environment where study abroad students can quickly immerse themselves in university life.

Ecuador-Quito (Universidad de San Francisco)

Founded in 1988, USFQ is one of the most distinguished private universities in Ecuador.  Quito, famous for its colonial Spanish architecture, is one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world.  In Quito, you will immerse yourself in the local language and culture.

This program allows students to choose between two different tracks, depending on the language level of the student. Students have the option to take courses at USFQ, alongside local Ecuadorian students or may elect for a combination of courses offered at the IES Study Center and USFQ.  All students will be placed in a homestay to allow for greater cultural immersion.

CIEE Study Center in Santiago, Chile; Universidad de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and/or Universidad Diego Portales

Located 60 miles from the coast of Chile and flanked to the east by the towering Andes, Santiago is home to over five million of Chile’s 16 million residents. In addition to being a cosmpolitan city, Santiago presents different aspects of Chilean culture as seen in the arts, economic development, its political history, and a wide range of interesting neighborhoods and activities. The city’s proximity to the mountains and the ocean makes it an ideal base for outdoor activities such as hiking, skiing, river-rafting, horseback riding, and enjoying the expansive coastline.

Mexico City-Mexico

Universidad Iberoamericana (Ibero)-Mexico City is one of Mexico’s top private educational institutions. Ibero enrolls 11,000 students across 34 undergraduate and 39 graduate programs. The university was founded in 1943 as a Jesuit institution.

Study abroad students directly enroll in undergraduate degree courses alongside local Ibero students. Students may take any course in Spanish for which they meet the prerequisite

Oaxaca- Mexico

This program seeks to look at the contemporary realities of international undocumented migration and border enforcement and the human, social and political implications in the context of Mexico, Central America and the United States. Students will have the opportunity to understand migration from both the perspective of the U.S. and the perspective of the sending communities.  The program will begin in Tucson, Arizona, which has been a major point of entry for undocumented migrants entering the United States. Students will meet with grassroots leaders organizing immigrants’ rights groups and talk with undocumented migrants about their journey to the United States and what they face once they are here. The program will be based in Oaxaca City, a community with a long history of migration to the U.S.  Here, students will learn about the effects of migration on rural and urban communities.  Students will also travel to Mexico City and the Mexican state of Chiapas to gain a better understanding of the different experiences that Central Americans face attempting to cross two borders.

Program provider SIT is a pioneer of experiential, field-based study abroad. Students learn from a variety of sources including small seminars and discussions, lectures from academics, policymakers, and numerous field visits throughout the semester.

USC Madrid Center- Spain

Students take USC art history and Spanish classes alongside other USC students at the Instituto Internacional, which also hosts several other American universities’ study abroad programs. Additionally, students can take some courses alonside Spanish students at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, a Spanish university with over 18,000 students and located in Getafe, 12 km. from the center of Madrid.

Students who have completed at least Spanish 260 may take a full courseload of USC classes at the Instituto Internacional or a combination of USC and Carlos III courses. Otherwise, students will take Spanish 260 and 261, and perhaps Art History 496, at the Instituto and the remainder of their courses at Carlos III. The Carlos III Getafe campus can be reached from the Instituto by public transportation in about 50 minutes.

Spanish has helped me flourish in numerous workplaces, in both the legal and business spheres.

Priyanka Khanna ’25

Through their guidance, I was able to improve my Spanish speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. The small class sizes also allowed for plenty of opportunities for speaking practice, which was invaluable in my language development.

Zachary Ho ’23

My Peruvian Maymester not only grew my knowledge of the Spanish language, but also presented pockets of Quechua into my everyday life.

Thomas Martynowicz ’24

Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures

Explore engagement opportunities, panels, workshops, updates and more on the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures website

Resources

Discover the wide variety of language learning resources available to USC students.

Faculty

Meet the faculty and staff of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, who are eager to guide you throughout your language learning journey!

Contact Information

Office Location

Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures
Taper Hall of Humanities (THH) 156
3501 Trousdale Parkway
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0358

Director of the Basic Language Program

Goretti Prieto Botana

Undergraduate Advisor

Jessica Kanoski