CESR Seminar and Brown Bag Series

Monday, April 8 | Simone Schaner – USC
Brown Bag

Monday, April 15 | Michel Maréchal – University of Zurich
Seminar | Standing in Prisoners’ Shoes: An Experiment on How Prison Experience Shapes Public Attitudes Towards Criminal Justice Policy

Monday, April 22 | Sandra Black – Columbia
Seminar

Monday, April 29 | Victoria Barone – UCLA
Seminar

Monday, May 6 | Gabriella Conti – UCL
Seminar

Monday, May 13 | Frauke Kreuter – University of Maryland
Seminar

Brown Bag |

Simone Schaner – USC

Monday, April 8, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Bio: Simone Schaner is an Associate Professor (Research) of Economics at the University of Southern California. She studies how the social and economic environment shapes individual and household choices, elucidating how beliefs and power affect the decision-making process.  Her work explores economic mechanisms that contribute to inefficiency and misallocation in low-income settings, with a focus on labor, financial, and healthcare markets. 

Dr. Schaner is the Scientific Director for Gender at Inclusion Economics. She is also an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, the Center for Effective Global Action, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an A.B. in economics from Princeton University.

Seminar | Standing in Prisoners’ Shoes: An Experiment on How Prison Experience Shapes Public Attitudes Towards Criminal Justice Policy

Michel Maréchal – University of Zurich

Monday, April 15, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Abstract: Over the last decades, many parts of the world have witnessed a notable shift towards more punitive criminal justice policies. While public opinion is considered a key force in shaping criminal justice policies, most individuals possess very limited knowledge of the everyday realities of life behind bars. This study explores the impact of prison experience on public attitudes towards punitive justice policies. We take advantage of a unique randomized controlled trial offering regular citizens the opportunity to undergo up to two days of incarceration in a newly built prison, replicating the real-life journey of inmates. Our results reveal that subjects who received an opportunity to gain firsthand prison experience showed a significant change in punitive attitudes, becoming less supportive of harsh criminal justice policies and donating more money to organizations advocating for moderate justice policies. While participants generally overestimated prisoner wellbeing, this misperception was not significantly altered by the experiment. Our results underscore the crucial role of personal experience in shaping support for criminal justice reform.

Bio: Michel Maréchal is a Visiting Professor of Economics at the Rady School of Management, UC San Diego, and Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics from the University of Zurich. His research is interdisciplinary and lies at the intersections of economics, social psychology, criminology, political science, and biology. He uses field and lab experimental methods, often in collaboration with firms, non-profit, and governmental organizations.

Seminar |

Sandra Black – Columbia

Monday, April 22, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Bio: Sandra E. Black is Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. She received her B.A. from UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.  Since that time, she worked as an Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and an Assistant, Associate, and ultimately Professor in the Department of Economics at UCLA, and held the Audre and Bernard Centennial Chair in Economics and Public Affairs in the Department of Economics at the University of Texas at Austin before arriving at Columbia University. She has served as an Editor of the Journal of Labor Economics as well as a Co-Editor and Editor of the Journal of Human Resources.  Dr. Black is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She served as a Member of Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers from August 2015-January 2017.  Her research focuses on the role of early life experiences on the long-run outcomes of children, as well as issues of gender and discrimination.

Seminar |

Victoria Barone – University of Notre Dame

Monday, April 29, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Bio: Victoria Barone received an undergraduate degree in Economics from the Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina, and completed master’s studies at Torcuato Di Tella University. She earned her Ph.D. in Economics from UCLA in 2023. Victoria is an applied economist with research interests at the intersection of public, health, and labor economics. Her research studies the optimal design of paid sick leave systems and the origin and unfolding of the opioid epidemic. At Notre Dame, she teaches Intermediate Microeconomics.

Seminar |

Gabriella Conti – UCL

Monday, May 6, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Bio: Gabriella’s areas of interest are health economics, the economics of human development, and biology and economics. Her research draws on both the biomedical and the social sciences with the aim of understanding the developmental origins of health inequalities, the role of child development as input in the production of lifecycle health and the behavioural and biological pathways through which early life shocks, investments and policies affect well-being throughout the lifecourse.

Gabriella has published in top journals in different disciplines, such as Science, PNAS, Pediatrics, the Economic Journal, the Journal of Econometrics and Lancet. Her work has been mentioned in the New York Times, Financial Times, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, and discussed in the British Parliament.

Gabriella has been awarded the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Economics, which “recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising”; and the Nick Hales Award from the DOHaD society, for a “young and emerging investigator who has made an outstanding scientific contribution to the DOHaD field”. She is also the PI of a 5-year ERC Consolidator Award from the European Research Council and ranks among the top 3% Female Economists for the last 10 years publications.

Seminar |

Frauke Kreuter – University of Maryland

Monday, May 13, 2024

12pm-1pm
VPD 203 and Zoom

Bio: Professor Frauke Kreuter is Co-Director of the Social Data Science Center and faculty member in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland, USA; and Professor of Statistics and Data Science at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the 2020 recipient of the Warren Mitofsky Innovators Award of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. In addition to her academic work Dr. Kreuter is the Founder of the International Program for Survey and Data Science, developed in response to the increasing demand from researchers and practitioners for the appropriate methods and right tools to face a changing data environment; Co-Founder of the Coleridge Initiative, whose goal is to accelerate data-driven research and policy around human beings and their interactions for program management, policy development, and scholarly purposes by enabling efficient, effective, and secure access to sensitive data about society and the economy. coleridgeinitiative.org; and Co-Founder of the German language podcast Dig Deep.

Past Events

For more information on the seminar presentations, or if you would like to attend the presentation, or to meet with any of the speakers, please contact Italo Lopez Garcia or Evan Sandlin.

For more information on the brown bag presentations, or if you would like to attend the presentation or be added to our list for announcements, please contact Michele Warnock.