The USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics engages students with the timeless values at the core of our humanity. In this effort, we seek moral reflection, understanding of self, and multidisciplinary dialogue. Levan students are encouraged to make a positive impact across society and around the world.

The Levan Institute hosts multiple innovative programs including an interdisciplinary minor, event series, speaker series, undergraduate research, faculty and student grants, courses, workshops, and undergraduate student associations. The institute collaborates with other USC departments, professional schools and programs to bring students and faculty together with authors and artists, philosophers and practitioners, and the leading ethical voices of our time.

 

 

Program Spotlight: Graphic Medicine Reading Group

Led by Medical Humanities Program Director Dr. Atia Sattar, the Graphic Medicine Reading Group will meet in April to discuss Stitches: A Memoir by David Smalls. Graphic narratives bring to life the complex experiences of illness today and allow readers to explore the world of health and medicine with striking combinations of text and image. More information and RSVP here.



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UPCOMING PROGRAMS AND EVENTS

“LEVINAS IN LATIN AMERICA,” A Lecture by Erin Graff Zivin

January 20, ACB 330 | 3:30 | More

Erin Graff Zivin is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature at USC. Professor Graff Zivin’s research and teaching interests focus on constructions of Jewishness and marranismo in the Luso-Hispanic Atlantic, aesthetic representations of torture and interrogation, the relationship between ethics, politics, and aesthetics (particularly in the context of Latin American literary and cultural studies), and the intersection of philosophy and critical theory more broadly.

Co-sponsored by Casden Faculty and Graduate Student Research Seminar

VIRTUES AND VICES SERIES: What Is Compassion?

January 21, THH 271 | 5 PM | Snacks Provided | More
 
Join us for a wide-ranging discussion that tries to get at the virtue of compassion. To be compassionate, we must remember that we are vulnerable to the same disasters as other human beings. We must feel pity for human suffering. But is pity always an appropriate response to suffering? The desire for justice is another common response to suffering. But is justice always compatible with compassion? What is the relationship between the virtue of compassion and other virtues like courage, wisdom, and reverence?
 
The discussion will be guided by the Levan Institute Undergraduate Fellows and students from Thematic Option and moderated by James Collins, Assistant Professor of Classics. 

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION IN A CHANGING WORLD: WHAT CANNOT BE SAID

January 22-24, UCI and USC Campuses | Open to Students and the Public | More

Timed to coincide with the first anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, this conference will look at the changing parameters of freedom of expression in a rapidly shifting world. Topics include freedom of expression on campus, the digital era, the law, and freedom of expression, problems of freedom of expression and journalism in conditions of repression, and conflicts and possible concords between freedom of expression and religious belief. Edward Snowden will appear via the web in conversation with his biographer, the prize-winning American journalist and author Barton Gellman.

Organized at USC by Jody Armour, Sherman Jackson, and Nomi Stolzenberg

USC Co-sponsors: Center for Law, History and Culture’s Program on Religious Accommodation; Office of the Provost; Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences; Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics; Annenberg Knight Program for Media & Religion; Center for Islamic Thought, Culture and Practice; Department of English; and Levan Institute Undergraduate Fellows

For additional organizers and co-sponsors, click here.

VISIONS & VOICES: WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM A SEVERED HEAD: A Conversation with John Corey Whaley

January 25, Aresty Auditorium, Harlyne J. Norris Research Tower, Health Sciences Campus | 5:30 PM | More

Reception and book signing to follow. Books will be available for purchase.

As part of the Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series, which engages core health issues in society today, we will present a conversation with John Corey Whaley, an award-winning author of books for young adults.

Whaley’s recent novel Noggin tells the story of a sixteen-year-old diagnosed with terminal cancer who participates in an experimental procedure to have his head removed and cryogenically frozen in order to be reattached to a donor’s body when it becomes available. A finalist for the National Book Award, this unconventional “cancer book” touches on fresh themes while following a main character who struggles to adjust when he wakes up five years later with a brand new body. 

In a thoughtful discussion, Whaley will consider mortality, the growing pains of adolescence, and the medical, ethical, and scientific aspects of Noggin’s severed head with Lynn Kysh of the USC Norris Medical Library.

Co-sponsored by the Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics, the USC Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics, and the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics

“TIME FAILS: READING ETHICS IN TWO POEMS OF BORGES,” A Lecture by Ronald Mendoza-de Jesús

February 3, THH 309K | 2 PM | More

Aesthetics, Ethics, Politics Series 

A USC Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar Lecture   

Is there something like an ethical time? If we take "ethics" not as a system of behavioral norms that responds to the question “What kind of life should I live?," but rather as what we obtain when our relations to others override our concern for our own lives, then what kind of time could be regarded as “ethical"? Through a reading of two poems by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, we will take up this question. Paying attention to the ways in which Borges imagines a time that is out of joint, we will explore whether Borges can help us to imagine a form of relational time that exceeds the temporality of the ego.                              

Co-sponsored by Department of Spanish and Portuguese  

PwP REL 376g – RELIGION AND HUMAN RIGHTS: CITIZENSHIP IN A GLOBAL ERA - Application Deadline

Levan Institute Problems without Passports
 
June 24 – July 13, 2016 | Application Deadline: Monday, February 8

Information Session: Tuesday, February 2 | 2 PM | THH 348

USC Instructor: Dr. Lyn Boyd-Judson

Students will travel to Oxford, Belfast, and Córdoba to ask: What are the intersections of religion, conflict, and human rights, and what are the practical politics of protecting these rights?

Additional Information and Application

"KEEPING GOVERNMENT HONEST: WHISTLEBLOWERS, TORTURE, AND AMERICA’S WAR ON TERROR,” A Discussion with John Kiriakou

February 9, DML 240 | 4 PM | More

John Kiriakou exposed the illegal CIA water boarding torture program in 2007 and was charged under the Espionage Act of 1917. In a plea deal, he was sentenced to 30 months in prison. Kiriakou had to leave five children at home when he was incarcerated in a federal prison in Pennsylvania in 2013. Kiriakou, the former chief of counterterrorist operations in Pakistan, has just been released after being imprisoned for nearly two years. Silenced, a 2015 film by Director James Spione, features the story of Kiriakou and three other prominent whistleblowers.

Co-sponsored by USC Political Student Assembly

"SILENCED": Film Screening Followed by a Q&A with John Kiriakou

February 9, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108 | 7 PM | More

Q&A following will be moderated by Robert Scheer, Clinical Professor of Communication, USC Annenberg and Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of truthdig.com

In Academy Award nominee James Spione's latest documentary, three national security whistle-blowers fight to reveal the darkest corners of America's war on terror--including CIA torture and NSA surveillance--and endure harsh consequences when the government retaliates. Silenced explores the unique courage and character it takes to challenge unethical behavior from within the American national security establishment.

Co-sponsored by School of Cinematic Arts

IS THE AMERICAN DREAM OBSELETE?

A Levan Coffeehouse Conversation on Practical Ethics

February 10, Ground Zero Cafe | Noon | Lunch Provided | More

Recent years have witnessed growing income inequality, the decreasing affordability of higher education, and the loss of high-paying blue collar jobs to technology and outsourcing overseas. Has the American meritocratic principle that all who work hard and play by the rules can make it big in America become a pipe dream? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan remarked at an event on poverty in January that “the American idea is that the condition of your birth does not determine the outcome of your life,” but noted that “there are a lot of people who do not believe it is there for them.” Is the American Dream obsolete?

Program Director and Moderator: Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Ann Owens, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Spatial Sciences, USC Dornsife
Jonathan Quong, Associate Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Robert Scheer, Clinical Professor of Communication, USC Annenberg and Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of truthdig.com
Jeffery Sellers, Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, USC Dornsife

"MANY BEAUTIFUL THINGS: THE LIFE AND VISION OF LILIAS TROTTER": Film Screening and Panel Discussion

February 22, Broccoli Theatre, SCA 112 | 7 PM | More

Written, directed, and produced by award-winning filmmaker Laura Waters Hinson

From Executive Producer Hisao Kurosawa (DreamsRan) comes the untold story of one of the Victorian Age’s greatest women artists. Many Beautiful Things plunges viewers into the complex age of Victorian England to meet Lilias Trotter, a daring young woman who won the favor of England’s top art critic, John Ruskin. Ruskin believed that, with sacrificial effort, her work could be “immortal.” But with her legacy on the line, Lilias made a stunning decision: to abandon a promising career in art for missionary work in North Africa. Told through the eyes of Miriam Rockness, an amateur scholar in her early 70s who became a significant expert on the life and work of Lilias Trotter, the film challenges viewers to question the meaning of real success and what is truly a life well-lived.

Moderator:
Gabriel Meyer, Executive Director, Ruskin Art Club

Panelists:
Ron Austin, Screenwriter and Producer and President of the Ruskin Art Club
Jim Spates, Professor and Ruskin Scholar from Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Ruth Weisberg, Professor of Fine Arts, USC Roski 

Co-sponsored by Ruskin Art Club and School of Cinematic Arts

"JUSTICE FOR MY SISTER": Film Screening followed by Q&A with Filmmaker Kimberly Bautista

February 23, THH 301 | 3:30 PM

The award-winning documentary film Justice for My Sister (2012), directed by Kimberly Bautista and narrated by Kate Del Castillo, takes an intimate look at violence against women in Guatemala by chronicling the three-year journey of Rebeca as she tries to hold her sister's killer accountable. She encounters many obstacles: a police record that is missing, a judge who is accused of killing his own wife, and witnesses who are too afraid to testify. In the end, Rebeca emerges as a leader in her community with a message for others: justice is possible.
 
Organized by Dr. Jessica Peet, USC Dornsife
Co-sponsored by Levan Campus Grants, School of International Relations, Department of Gender Studies, and POIR Graduate Student Association

GRAPHIC MEDICINE READING GROUP: "CANCER VIXEN: A TRUE STORY," by Marisa Acocella Marchetto

February 24, THH 271 | 5 PM | More

The Graphic Medicine Reading Group will bring together students and faculty from all fields to address health issues through a reading of graphic novels and stories. Written by both physicians and patients, these artful narratives bring to life the complex experiences of illness today. We hope that you will join us to explore the world of health and medicine as illustrated in these striking combinations of text and image. Books will be provided to the first 12 people upon RSVP.

Led by Dr. Atia Sattar, Medical Humanities Program Director

ZYGO SERIES—HEALTH CARE FOR REFUGEES: What Is at Stake?

February 26, DML 241 | 12:30 PM | Lunch Provided | More

With President Obama announcing that the U.S. will admit 10,000 Syrian refugees within the next year for resettlement, the need for providing and funding health care for these refugees will only rise, alongside critiques of this diversion of funds away from U.S. citizens. Speakers for this panel will examine the costs and benefits of providing care to refugees in the U.S. and how the current system can be improved.

Moderator:
Varun Awasthi, ZYGO Student Director

Panelists:
David Baron, Assistant Dean, International Relations and Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Psychiatry, USC Keck; Psychiatrist-In-Chief, Keck Medical Center at USC; Director, Global Center for Exercise, Psychiatry and Sports at USC
Linda Lopez, Chief, Office of Immigrant Affairs, Mayor's Office, City of Los Angeles
Murali Nair, Clinical Professor, USC Social Work
William Reckner, PhD Candidate, Philosophy, University of California, Los Angeles

Co-sponsored by Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

UNDERSTANDING SYRIA'S REFUGEE CRISIS

Spring 2016 Conference

February 26, ASC 207 | 9 - 6:30 PM | RSVP | More

A one-day conference at the University of Southern California will bring together scholars, journalists and activists to explore the historic roots of the crisis, seeking to understand how religious and political forces over the last century have created the landscape for the next century.

Keynote: "Syria: The Death of a Nation" by Paul Danahar
Paul Danahar is the author of the 2015 book The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring. He was the BBC's Middle East Bureau Chief between 2010 - 2013 based in Jerusalem, and he ran news coverage of the Arab Spring for which he won two Emmys and a Peabody.

USC Sponsors: Knight Program in Media and Religion, The GroundTruth Project, Center for Religion and Civic Culture, Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, Center for Public Diplomacy, and Center for Islamic Thought, Culture and Practice

LEVAN ETHICS ESSAY CONTEST

Submission Deadline: March 4 | More

The Levan Ethics Essay Contest aims to recognize the best written work on ethics by USC undergraduate students. Papers can be a discussion of a current ethical issue, or a critical case analysis of recent ethics violations in a professional field (engineering, business, health sciences, law, politics, etc.)

Suggested areas for essays:

  • Global Ethics: Moral problems with an international focus
  • Professional Ethics: Examination of the ethical component of a profession, or of a specific ethical problem faced by members of the profession
  • Social Justice: Critical analysis of a moral issue of primarily social significance
  • Moral Decision-making: Exploration or analysis of a decision based on moral or ethical reasoning.

Awards will be announced at the April 2016 Annual Undergraduate Writers' Conference.

"SHOUT GLADI GLADI": Film Screening Followed by Q&A with Adam Friedman and Iain Kennedy

March 8, Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108 | 7 PM | More

Written and Directed by Adam Friedman and Iain Kennedy
 
Followed by a Q&A with Adam Friedman and SCA Alum Iain Kennedy

Narrated by Academy Award® winning actress Meryl Streep, Shout Gladi Gladi celebrates the extraordinary people who rescue African women and girls from obstetric fistula, a medical condition that can turn them into reviled outcasts. Directed by Adam Friedman and Iain Kennedy, and filmed in Malawi and Sierra Leone, the film spotlights the quest of Ann Gloag, the indefatigable philanthropist and former nurse who drives the movement to save these vulnerable women and presents the patients as they tell stirring tales of their struggles and triumphs. Everything culminates with the exuberant Gladi Gladi ceremony, a singing and dancing blowout that marks the day the women and girls return home cured.

Co-sponsored by School of Cinematic Arts, Institute for Global Health, and Center for Women and Men

INTO THE MAGIC SHOP

March 8, DML 240 | 7 PM

Mindfulness USC presents a Neurosurgeon's Quest to Discover the Mysteries of the Brain and the Secrets of the Heart, featuring James Doty, MD.

Book sale and reception to follow.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Religious Life

HAS THE AMERICAN POLITICAL CAMPAIGN FINANCE SYSTEM KILLED DEMOCRACY?

A Levan Coffeehouse Conversation on Practical Ethics

March 9, Ground Zero Cafe | Noon PM | Lunch Provided | More

A major theme of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign is campaign finance reform.  He argues that the way political elections are funded in America deprives all but the wealthiest few individuals and corporations of meaningful influence on their outcome.  Yet the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that donations to political campaigns count as speech protected under the First Amendment to the Constitution.   What types of reforms would be desirable, and possible, for American democracy?

Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
John Dreher, Associate Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Christian Grose, Associate Professor of Political Science, USC Dornsife
Dan Schnur, Director, Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics and Assistant Professor of the Practice of Political Science, USC Dornsife

Co-sponsored by Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics

THE END OF KARMA: HOPE AND FURY AMONG INDIA'S YOUNG

March 23, ANN L101 | Noon | Lunch Provided | More

Author, Somini Sengupta offers a penetrating, personal look at contemporary India - the world's largest democracy at a moment of transition. Reception and book signing to follow.

Somini Sengupta emigrated from Calcutta to California as a young child in 1975. Returning thirty years later as the bureau chief for the New York Times, she found a vastly different country: one defined as much by aspiration and possibility - at least by the illusion of possibility - as it is by the structures of sex and caste.

Co-sponsored by Office of Religious Life, Knight Chair in Religion and Media, Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, Asian Pacific American Student Assembly, and the Association of Indian Students

LEVAN-OXFORD SPRING 2016 SEMINAR

HUMAN RIGHTS IN AND AFTER CONFLICT

March 19-25 | Oxford, UK | More

The Levan Institute partners with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict annually to offer a seminar at the University of Oxford. Areas of study include human rights in and after conflict, humanitarian action, conflict trends, human rights law, and peacemaking with a focus on recent armed conflicts. The module is a healthy mix of seminars, working groups, and student presentations.

THE GOOD DEATH: AMERICA'S MOST UNDERREPORTED STORY

March 29, ANN 106 | Noon | Lunch Provided | RSVP

Journalist Ann Neumann became her father's full-time caregiver after he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. After he died, she was haunted by a question: Was her father's death a good death? Hear about Ann's extraordinary journey to discover what a good death means today and how to report on this taboo topic. Join us for the Journalism Director's Forum conversation between Ann Neumann, author of The Good Death: An Exploration of Dying in America, and Michelle Levander, Director of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism.

Ann Neumann's book will be on sale at the event.

Sponsored by:
Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Knight Program for Media and Religion
Annenberg Center for Health Journalism
Dornsife Center for Religion and Civic Culture
Levan Institute of Humanities and Ethics
Office of Religious Life

VISIONS & VOICES: MUSIC AND MEDICINE: Experiments and Exploration

March 31, Mayer Auditorium, Health Sciences Campus | 4 PM | More

Reception to follow

As part of the Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series, which engages core health issues in society today, we will bring together experts in neuroscience, geriatrics, occupational therapy, and physical therapy with celebrated musicians for an afternoon of music and conversation about how music influences the human brain.

Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI) director Berislav Zlokovic—a leader in Alzheimer’s disease research and a classically trained tenor whom Thomson Reuters has listed among “the world’s most influential scientific minds”—will moderate a fascinating discussion with Marcus Raichle, a world-renowned neurologist and university professor at Washington University in St. Louis; Alison Balbag, an award-winning harpist and current PhD candidate at the USC Davis School of Gerontology; Christopher Snowdy, assistant professor of clinical psychiatry and assistant program director of USC+LAC Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Program; and singers from LA Opera who have previously partnered with the ZNI as part of the Music and Memories program, in which young singers perform for individuals affected by dementia who live in assisted-care facilities. Concert pianist Zora Mihailovich will also perform in this multidisciplinary event that will illuminate the ways music impacts the mind.

VIRTUES AND VICES SERIES: What Is Wisdom?

April 5, DML 241 | 5 PM | Snacks Provided | More

Join us for the last of the Virtues and Vices series this spring to discuss the virtue of wisdom. In some ancient traditions, wisdom is associated with reason and right judgment. It is the supreme virtue that helps us judge how and when to act with other virtues. Wisdom, then, is the virtue that philosophers long for most. Where do we find wisdom today? What is the role of wisdom in our daily lives?

The discussion will be guided by the Levan Institute Undergraduate Fellows and students from Thematic Option and moderated by James Collins, Assistant Professor of Classics.

Image: Michelle Larsen, Wisdom

80/20: A GENDER CRISIS IN POLITICS?

April 14, DML 241 | 12:30 PM | Lunch Provided | More

A Conversation with Janice Kamenir-Reznik and Brie Loskota

ZYGO Student Series on Ethics in Medicine

The US Senate passed legislation in December 2015 to defund Planned Parenthood in response to a widely debunked series of videos made by an anti-abortion group. The fact that men currently comprise 80% of the Senate seats raises many questions regarding the legislature’s approach to women’s health services on a broader level. Is this immense gender disparity ethically problematic for women’s issues like equality in the workplace and equal pay, acess to healthcare and childcare, and women in the military? Many legislatures around the world have quotas to ease the gender disparity in political assemblies. Is it time for the US to use a quota system?

Co-sponsored by Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Secular University, Wicked Problem?

April 15, DML 241 | 4 PM | More

Please join Dr. Carlos Colorado in a discussion of the "wicked trajectories" that he sees embedded in the secular university. The discussion will include both a broad investigation into the definition of the secular as well as an analysis of its place within the university, particularly with respect to the decline of the humanities. Dr. Colorado is Chair of the Department of Religion and Culture at the University of Winnipeg, a founding member of their Centre for the Liberal Arts and Secular Society, and a board member of the Jane Goodall Foundation.

This is the inaugural event in the series: "On Wicked Problems: A Speakers Series by the Provost's Postdoctoral Scholars in the Humanities."

Organizing Sponsors: Office of the Provost and School of Religion

GRAPHIC MEDICINE READING GROUP: "STITCHES: A MEMOIR," by David Smalls

April 20, THH 271 | 5 PM | RSVP | More

The Graphic Medicine Reading Group will bring together students and faculty from all fields to address health issues through a reading of graphic novels and stories. Written by both physicians and patients, these artful narratives bring to life the complex experiences of illness today. We hope that you will join us to explore the world of health and medicine as illustrated in these striking combinations of text and image. Books will be provided to the first 12 people upon RSVP.

Led by Dr. Atia Sattar, Medical Humanities Program Director

LEVAN INSTITUTE ETHICS BOOT CAMP: DEVELOPING YOUR ETHICAL TOOLKIT

April 22, Leavey Library Auditorium | 10:30-3 PM
Lunch and Coffee Provided | RSVP | More

Questions of ethics are inescapable. Scientists' duties to the public can often conflict with loyalty to their company. Business leaders must not only decide what level of risk is acceptable, but also how to weigh different kinds of risk. Journalists must question when they should promise confidentiality, and if there are ever any grounds for breaking such a promise.

Through a partnership between the Levan Institute, Dornsife philosophy graduate students, and the Levan Undergraduate Fellows, this new annual workshop will introduce USC students from across majors to common ethical problems they may encounter.

After participating in this workshop, you will:
•Be able to critically engage with contemporary ethical theories;
•Understand the interaction of practical, legal, and moral considerations in a variety of professional contexts;
•Be empowered to engage as informed and confident participants in ethical discussion; and
•Be equipped to apply moral considerations to problems in their personal and professional lives.

TECHNOLOGY AND SOVEREIGNTY: A CSLC Symposium with Mark Hansen

April 28, 3-5 PM and April 29, 9-4:30 PM | Leavey Library Auditorium
 
This year’s Comparative Studies in Literature and Culture symposium will be a conversation between Professor Mark Hansen (Duke University), video-artist Claudia Joskowitcz (MIT), and the multi-disciplinary work of the CSLC graduate students and USC faculty. This symposium explores the relationship between technology, aesthetic practice, sovereignty, and the human subject across the range of linguistic, geographic and medial frameworks in which CSLC students work. 
 
Keynote Speaker: Mark Hansen, Professor of Literature and Director of Graduate Studies for the Duke Program in Literature | April 28 at 3 PM
 
For more information and to RSVP, please email cslc.symposium@gmail.com
 
Co-sponsored by Graduate Student Government, Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics Campus Grant Program, Digital Humanities Institute, and Visual Studies Research Institute; Departments of Comparative Literature, French and Italian, Art History, and East Asian Languages and Culture | Image: Shou Cheng Lin

WHAT MATTERS TO ME AND WHY

Ground Zero Cafe | Noon | Lunch Provided | More

This series encourages reflection about values, beliefs, and motivation in the lives of those who help shape our university. Presenters are encouraged to talk about choices made, difficulties encountered, and commitments solidified.

January 20: David Albertson, Associate Professor of Religion and Faculty Fellow at Parkside Arts & Humanities Residential College

February 3: Oliver Mayer, Associate Professor of Dramatic Writing and Faculty Master at Parkside International Residential College

March 2: Ginger Clark, Professor of Clinical Education

April 6: Laura Baker, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Faculty Master at Webb Residential College

Co-sponsored by Office of Religious Life

COURSES AND PROGRAMS

NEW COURSES

Religion and Human Rights (REL 376g, Spring 2016)

Problems without Passports: Religion and Human Rights: Citizenship in a Global Era (Oxford, Belfast, and Córdoba, Summer 2016)

PwP Application Information

Taught by USC Levan Institute Director Lyn Boyd-Judson, these exciting courses are about reading deeply and discussing a variety of religious views on human rights. The goal is to forge useful frameworks for interpreting the complexity of competing ideas on subjects such as gender, race, class, culture, and political systems.

SOCIAL JUSTICE REVIEW

 

Managed and edited by USC students, the Social Justice Review is a multidisciplinary e-journal in which undergraduate students from around the world may publish polished, mindfully-crafted works on social justice. These may include academic writings, fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, memoir, hybrid prose, or other writing genres. More

MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, DEVELOPMENT, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

 

This interdisciplinary minor prepares students for careers and leadership roles in arenas such as political economy, health and wellness, gender equity, global medicine, economic development, human welfare, and social justice. More

PROJECT 32


Middle school and high school students at 32nd Street School near USC receive weekly tutoring. Each session includes a lesson from a group of tutors and small-group or individual tutoring. Participants may receive Levan Scholar program credit. More

  • Janet Kramer
  • Taper Hall of Humanities, Suite 348
  • University of Southern California