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In this effort, the Institute collaborates with departments, professional schools and programs across the university to bring students and faculty together with authors and artists, philosophers and practitioners, and the ethical voices of our time.

Ethical Issue of the Month: 

A Powerful New Way to Edit DNA - A technique is stirring excitement while raising profound questions.

 

Featured in USC Dornsife News: Humanitarian Spring

USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics’ Lyn Boyd-Judson leads seven undergraduates to the University of Oxford for a five-day workshop on human rights and humanitarian action. More

LEVAN-OXFORD WORKSHOP: The Ethics of Human Rights and Development in the Twenty-First Century City

September 7-14, 2014 | New York City, NY

In partnership with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict, Yale University, Quinnipiac University, and the UN Development Program, the USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics invites USC undergraduate and graduate students to apply for a small intensive workshop in human rights and development. The academic component of the seminar will involve morning and afternoon sessions dedicated to a critical analysis of the field of development ethics, including: basic needs; capabilities and human development approaches; participatory planning and community action; deliberation and agency; the role of law, institutions and social movements; and global public health initiatives.

For more information and application information click here

Carnegie Council International Student Photography Contest, 2014: Fairness and Its Opposite

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its second annual International Student Photography Contest. The contest is part of Ethics for a Connected World, a three-year global education project in celebration of the 2014 Carnegie Council Centennial.

In a world with huge gulfs of wealth and power, how do we ensure that everybody has access to opportunity? Carnegie Council believes that part of the answer lies in fairness—the means by which a society balances the rights and responsibilities of its citizens, toward each other and toward the state.

The contest will be conducted on Carnegie Council's Global Ethics Network, a social media platform for exploring the role of ethics in international relations. Check out last year's winners on the theme of Living with Differences and click here for details on how to participate.

PHOTO TOPIC: Fairness and Its Opposite

CONTEST DEADLINE: October 31, 2014

CALL FOR 2014-2015 LEVAN UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWS

The Levan Fellows serve as ambassadors for the institute and work closely with Dr. Lyn Boyd-Judson, director of the Levan Institute, on designing and implementing mission-related projects. The program provides an interdisciplinary cohort-based experience that offers students the opportunity to integrate their academic interests with Dornsife programming and events.

For more information and application information click here

Levan Institute Work Study Position

Now Accepting Applicants

The Levan Institute is accepting undergraduate student applicants. If interested, please contact Janet Kramer.

Spring 2014 Levan Campus Grant Recipients

Grants are available to students, faculty, and staff across the College who need funds for activities that coincide with the Levan Institute's mission. Student groups and student-focused projects are given a strong first priority, as are collaborative efforts across departments and schools.

Juno Zhu, a Resident Assistant at Cardinal 'n' Gold apartments, created a mobile library for her residents. The library features books about the science of happiness and human behavior. Juno was inspired by USC Dornsife's course, The Science of Happiness.

Kendall Williams, a graduate of Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and Assistant Director of USC Admissions, held a screening of Precious Knowledge at USC during EdMonth. The film documents the fight to keep the ethnic studies program within Arizona public schools. Kendall moderated a panel discussion following the screening.

Jackson Burgess with Fractal literary magazine, printed Fractal's third issue for public release. This will be the first edition in print form. Established in 2012, Fractalis a literary magazine founded and edited by students of the University of Southern California. Fractal publishes fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction and operates as a USC student organization.

Francesca Bessy with USC Stand: the anti-genocide coalition used a Levan Grant to rent on-campus space for the event "Your Voice, Your World: An Art and Student Speaker Initiative." The event featured performances and speakers on global activism. 

Sarah Urke and the Trojan Neurotrama Society hosted a lecture on the professional, social, and ethical considerations related to treating traumatic brain injuries. The event featured Dr. Stuart Swadron, Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine and Assistant Dean for Pre-Health Undergraduate Studies. 

Alejandro Medina will create an English version of his website 100OJOS LATINOS to share with USC Students and Faculty. The website features Latin American photographers covering social, political, and environmental issues from the region. The English website will be unveiled in Fall 2014.

Learn more about Levan Campus Grants here

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Past events for Spring 2014

ZYGO Series—HALF THE STORY: The Increasing Role of Alternative Medicine

Friday, April 25, 2014, 12:30-2 PM | DML 241| Lunch Served

Co-sponsored by the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is being used increasingly alongside conventional medical treatments for a wide variety of medical conditions; however, the techniques employed by alternative health systems such as Ayurveda or Traditional Chinese Medicine have not been researched in a manner acceptable according to many US physicians. This seminar seeks to explore how alternative medicine is currently being used in conjunction with conventional medicine and alternative medicine's academic status. Panelists will discuss how alternative medicine and cross-cultural healing is being integrated into medical school activities, if at all, and whether research on alternative techniques is increasing in the United States.

ModeratorPavitra Krishnamani, ZYGO Director, Levan Graduate Fellow and Harman Academy Fellow

Panelists:
Julia Borovay, Professor, HP 450, “Traditional Eastern Medicine & Modern Health,” Keck School of Medicine
Murali Nair, Clinical Professor and Co-Author of “Healing Across Cultures,” USC School of Social Work
Armaity Austin, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Family Medicine and Education Committee Co-Chair at the USC Institute for Integrative Health, Keck School of Medicine
Debu Tripathy, MD, Professor of Medicine, Priscilla and Art Ulene Chair in Women’s Cancer, and Clinical Committee Co-Chair at the USC Institute for Integrative Health, Keck School of Medicine
Samantha Myers, Fourth-year Medical Student, Keck School of Medicine
Kristen Roehl, Second-year Medical Student, Keck School of Medicine

The ZYGO series is organized by USC students in health and medicine who seek dialogue with USC faculty across disciplines in order to increase the integration of ethical themes into their curriculum.

zygo / ˈzʌɪgəʊ, ˈzɪgəʊ pref. relating to union or joining.

Trojan Neurotrauma Society - The Medical and Ethical Elements of Emergency Brain Injury Care

April 18, 2014, 3 PM | THH 101

Emergency Neurological Life Support for Traumatic Brain Injury

The Neurotrauma Lecture Series, presented by the Trojan Neurotrauma Society, features Dr. Stuart Swadron. Dr. Swadron is assistant dean of pre-health undergraduate studies and an associate clinical professor of emergency medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. He is also an attending staff physician in the LAC+USC emergency department and the former program director of the residency program in emergency medicine at LAC+USC. 

Dr. Swadron is an internationally recognized expert in emergency medicine and the primary author of the paper detailing Emergency Neurological Life Support (ENLS) for traumatic brain injury (TBI). He will be leading a lecture and discussion on ENLS for TBI and the social and ethical implications of emergency traumatic brain injury care. 

This event is free and open to the public, sponsored by the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, and the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics Campus Grant Program

Film Screening: "Who is Dayani Cristal?"

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 7 PM | The Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

Co-sponsored by the USC School of Cinematic Arts 

Directed by Marc Silver

Following a team of dedicated staff from the Pima County Morgue in Arizona, director Marc Silver seeks to give an anonymous man an identity. As the forensic investigation unfolds, Mexican actor and activist Gael Garcia Bernal retraces this man’s steps along the migrant trail in Central America. In an effort to understand what it must have felt like to make this final journey, he embeds himself among migrant travelers on their own mission to cross the border. More

Winner: World Cinema Cinematography Award, Sundance Film Festival 2013
Official Selection: Sundance Film Festival 2013, New York Film Festival 2013

"Measured, meditative and scrupulously constructed, alternately sobering and enlightening, Who Is Dayani Cristal? describes a possible, terrible fate experienced by scores of people every year." —The 51st New York Film Festival

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be. 

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics--PLAYING FAIR OR PLAYING GREAT: Why shouldn't athletes dope?

Wednesday, April 9, 2014, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Served

 
Coffeehouse Program Director Professor Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Athletics seeks to develop supreme excellence in human skills—faster, stronger, longer, farther, more complex than ever before. Advances in training techniques and equipment that improve athletic performance have been widely accepted, despite the fact that these often costly resources differentially advantage those athletes who do and those who do not have access to them. But we draw the line at performance-enhancing drugs. Why? For reasons of competitive fairness? For paternalistic concerns with athletes’ health? Are prohibitions on doping morally justified, or should we just allow athletes to improve their performance by any means they choose?

Coffeehouse Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
William Morgan, Professor of the Division of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy and the Annenberg School of Communication
Mike Shapiro, Dorothy W. Nelson Professor of Law, USC Gould School of Law
John Callaghan, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, USC Dornsife
James Collins, Assistant Professor of Classics, USC Dornsife
Alida Liberman, PhD Candidate, Philosophy, USC Dornsife

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. 

Film Screening: "These Birds Walk"

Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7 PM | The Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

Co-sponsored by the USC School of Cinematic Arts and the Pakistani Students Association

Directed by Omar Mullik and Bassam Tariq

In Karachi, Pak­istan, a run­away boy’s life hangs on one crit­i­cal ques­tion: where is home? The streets, an orphan­age, or with the fam­ily he fled in the first place? More

"This material is so rich, that they could have developed a whole reality series from the hundred thousand human stories that have passed through his walls...they produce a profound, interwoven work of literary non-fiction, vérité, in the tradition of Truman Capote and Dave Eggers. This is the film that Edhi would have given us: for a few days, we calmly live among his people. Two in particular." —Omer M. Mosaffar, RogerEbert.com

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be. 

"Altering American Consciousness: Alcohol, Drug Use and American Medicine" - A Lecture by Sarah W. Tracy

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 4 PM | Mayer Auditorium, Health Sciences Campus

Visions & Voices - The Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series

As part of the Medical Humanities, Arts and Ethics Series, which engages core health issues in society today, we will present an afternoon with Sarah W. Tracy, author ofAlcoholism in America from Reconstruction to Prohibition and co-editor of Altering American Consciousness: The History of Alcohol and Drug Use in the United States, 1800-2000. Tracy earned her doctorate in the history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining the Honors College at the University of Oklahoma, she taught at the universities of Delaware, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin and at Yale University. Tracy will discuss the evolving history of addiction, treatment and drug-related policy in the United States, including the significance of the 1914 Harrison Narcotic Act, a tax act that regulated the sale of opiates and cocaine. The Harrison Act effectively banned the prescription of opiates for addiction treatment, permitting their use for only “medical” purposes. One hundred years later, our nation continues to struggle with the growing problem of addiction to both prescription painkillers and stimulants.

Organized by Pamela Schaff (Pediatrics and Keck Educational Affairs), Erin Quinn(Family Medicine and Dornsife Science and Health) and Lyn Boyd-Judson (Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics)

Co-sponsored by the Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts and Ethics and the USC Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics

The Visions & Voices Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Event Series invites speakers who, through their creative or scholarly work, address some of the core issues facing the health of individuals and society. 

America's Use of Prescription and Illegal Drugs—The role of the medical profession: a historical and current issues discussion

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 12-1:30 PM | USC University Club

The Levan Institute hosted a small lunch discussion with Dr. Sarah Tracy (Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma), Dr. Erin Quinn (Associate Dean for Dornsife Science and Health) and Dr. Kenneth Geller (Director of Dornsife Pre-Health Advisement) at the University Park Campus on the role of the medical profession in America's use of perscription and illegal drugs.

What Matters to Me and Why with Ainsley Carry

Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 12 PM | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Served

Co-Sponsored by the Office of Religious Life

Ainsley Carry is the Vice Provost of Student Affairs at the University of Southern California.  Among his area of oversight are the residential colleges, Career Center, Engemann Student Health Center, Lyon Recreation Center, and Ronald Tutor Campus Center.  

With over two decades of experience in college administration he has held administrative positions and faculty appointments at Southern Methodist University, the University of Arkansas, the University of Florida, and Temple University.  Prior to joining USC, he served as Vice President for Student Affairs at Auburn University.

What Matters to Me and Why is a program that encourages reflection about values, beliefs and motivations. It aims to help students and others better understand the lives and inspirations of those who shape the University.

ZYGO Series—AUTHORITY TO KILL: The Human Choice to Euthanize Humans and Other Animals

Friday, March 28, 2014, 12:30-2 PM | The Fishbowl (URC) | Lunch Served

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study

In both research and veterinary medicine, humans have been given the right to decide when it is humane for an animal to be put down. However, it is not the same with other human beings, as evidenced by the debate about human euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS). While some countries have legalized PAS, the United States remains in doubt about giving patients the “right to die” and doctors the authority to euthanize them as per their wishes. It is out of this debate that legal documents such as the advanced directives have arisen. This seminar will seek to explore the perspectives on both animal and human euthanasia and discuss if, and under what circumstances, human beings have the authority to kill. 

ModeratorIsabella Wu, ZYGO Program Manager, Levan Scholar and Dornsife Undergraduate

ModeratorIsabella Wu, ZYGO Program Manager, Levan Scholar and Dornsife Undergraduate

Panelists
Alex Capron, University Professor, USC Gould School of Law, Scott H. Bice Chair in Healthcare Law, Policy and Ethics, Professor of Law and Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Co-Director, Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics
Ilanit Brook, MD, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Palliative Care, Keck School of Medicine 
Jim Burklo, Associate Dean, USC Office of Religious Life 
William DePaolo, Assistant Professor, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine 

Program DirectorPavitra Krishnamani, Levan Graduate Fellow

The ZYGO series is organized by USC students in health and medicine who seek dialogue with USC faculty across disciplines in order to increase the integration of ethical themes into their curriculum.

zygo / ˈzʌɪgəʊ, ˈzɪgəʊ pref. relating to union or joining.

LEVAN OXFORD WORKSHOP: HUMAN RIGHTS IN AND AFTER CONFLICT

March 23-28, 2014

The Levan Institute partnered with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict to offer a workshop at the University of Oxford. Areas of study included human rights in and after conflict, humanitarian action, conflict trends, human rights law, and peacemaking with a focus on recent armed conflicts. The module was a healthy mix of seminars, working groups, and student presentations. Students met twice before Spring Break with Levan director Dr. Lyn Boyd-Judson to discuss assigned readings and research plans. Boyd-Judson traveled with the students as a member of the workshop teaching team. Dr. Hugo Slim of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict led the module. Other research fellows at the ELAC led seminars and working groups in their research areas.

APPLICATION DEADLINE PASSED

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics--ECONOMIC JUSTICE: Is our system fair?

Wednesday, March 12, 2014, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Served

 
Program Director Professor Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

There has lately been increasing discussion in the United States about economic inequality, as the gap between rich and poor has grown and upward mobility has declined. With decreased funding for social support programs and increasing costs of higher education, some fear that the American Dream has become out of reach. One particular locus of debate concerns not welfare policy, but wage policy. When a full time wage worker cannot support herself above the poverty line, still less her family, while corporate executives receive salaries higher by a factor of thousands than other workers at the same firm, it is natural to ask: Is there such a thing as too low a wage for work, too high a wage, or too great a differential in wages? Should we legislate a higher minimum wage, or cap executive salaries? Or would doing so infringe liberty, or prove counterproductive, making the worst off worse off still?

Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science, USC Dornsife 

Panelists:
Rhacel Parrenas, Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies and Chair of Sociology, USC Dornsife 
Jonathan Quong, Associate Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife 
Kevin Starr, University Professor and Professor of History, and Policy, Planning, and Development, USC Dornsife
Leandro S. Carvalho, Associate Economist at the Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR), USC Dornsife

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. 

EdMonth presents "Precious Knowledge," a screening and discussion

Monday, March 10, 2014, 6 PM | TCC 302

Co-sponsored by the Academic Culture Assembly, Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, El Centro Chicano and the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics Campus Grant Program

Precious Knowledge documents the roller coaster of the ethnic studies program within Arizona public schools. Opponents of the program launched a campaign to convince the public that ethnic studies are anti-American and teach “reverse racism.” The film highlights how Tucson High School students organized to save the discipline, which was having such a positive impact on graduation rates for underrepresented students. Despite their efforts, in 2011 Arizona lawmakers passed a bill giving unilateral power to the state superintendent of schools to abolish ethnic studies classes.

Recently, California State University, Los Angeles, has faced a similar struggle. The presence of a multicultural narrative has been jeopardized within the school’s general education system. On February 25th, the academic senate at CSULA approved a motion that all students will have to take a course focusing on race/ethnicity in order to graduate. The screening and discussion will explore the question, “Can the government really justify removing programs that the people, the community, are demanding?” The fight to restore ethnic studies continues in Arizona and other states as the education system continues to adapt to a changing populace.

Join us for a panel discussion, following the screening to learn more about the struggles occurring at CSULA and across the country. Screening at 6 PM, followed by pizza and discussion at 7:30 PM.

Moderator:
Kendall Williams, Assistant Director USC Admissions and Dornsife American Studies and Ethnicity ‘11

Panelists:
Melina Abdullah, Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles; Abel Correa, Lecturer of Chicano Studies at California State University, Los Angeles; Elizabeth Guzman, Dornsife Undergraduate

Organizers:
Helen Yuan, EdMonth Coordinator; Kendall Williams, Assistant Director USC Admissions

What Matters to Me and Why with Marilyn Flynn

Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 12 PM | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Served

Co-Sponsored by the Office of Religous Life

Marilyn Flynn is the Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Southern California.

Under her leadership, the school significantly expanded its Hamovitch Center for Science in the Human Service and recruited a nationally recognized faculty.

She also created a new graduate academic center in San Diego and at the Skirball Cultural Center in West Los Angeles, launched a full web-based graduate degree program through the Virtual Academic Center, and established the Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families.

What Matters to Me and Why is a program that encourages reflection about values, beliefs and motivations. It aims to help students and others better understand the lives and inspirations of those who shape the University.

ZYGO Series—HOLOCAUST EXPERIMENTS’ EFFECTS ON MODERN MEDICINE: Looking Back to Move Forward

Friday, February 28, 2014, 12:30 PM | Doheny Memorial Library G28 | Lunch Served

Co-sponsored by the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics, the Harman Academy for Polymathic Study, and the USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education

Human experimentation was a major war crime during the Holocaust and cruel experiments resulted in the death and disability of many, but yielded medical research. USC Libraries hosts a copy of “Pernkoph atlas” – a highly controversial Nazi medical publication. This seminar will discuss questions about this resource, such as:  If USC Libraries hosts a copy of this book do Nazi experiments become an accepted part of medical history? What can we learn from these experiments?  From a broad perspective, questions will be asked, such as:  What are the conceivable uses for these types of texts? How have we used other ethically questionable medical or psychological experiments to inform us ethically and academically?

ModeratorPavitra Krishnamani, Levan Graduate Fellow and ZYGO Director

Panelists:
Wolf Gruner, Shapell-Guerin Chair in Jewish Studies and Professor of History
Sari Siegel, USC Graduate Student studying Nazi medicine
Megan Rosenbloom, Head of Metadata & Content Management for the Norris Medical Library

The ZYGO series is organized by USC students in health and medicine who seek dialogue with USC faculty across disciplines in order to increase the integration of ethical themes into their curriculum.

zygo / ˈzʌɪgəʊ, ˈzɪgəʊ pref. relating to union or joining. 

ROUNDTABLE: FINDING THE HUMAN IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES--How Many Bytes Does it Take to Get to the Center

Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 4 PM | Doheny Memorial Library 240

Organizing sponsors: The Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics and the USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education

Co-sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Teaching

In our current digital landscape, information is available at a much faster speed, from a larger variety of sources, and through new mediums. This availability of resources has changed not just the way society stays informed, but the way academic subjects are both explored and taught. Nowhere is this more prevalent than in the humanities, where new media has dramatically changed research and scholarship. The term “digital humanities” was coined a decade ago in acknowledgement of the influence of technological innovations on subjects of the humanities, and has since spread as a term incorporated by a growing number of departments, degree programs, research centers, and academic journals in the humanities across the country. Teaching digital humanities comes with new and exciting ways to engage students with subjects, but it also comes with many questions as teaching practices evolve to incorporate digital sources. This panel discussion will bring together leading practitioners and theoreticians of digital humanities, to probe the role that this emerging field plays in intellectual life today.

What are the pedagogical opportunities instructors of the humanities have as they are able to rely on digital resources as learning materials? Conversely, what is lost in as the humanities increasingly relies more on digital influences? How does this reliance on digital sources change the way humanities are explored and taught in the classroom?

Film Screening: "Lili's Journey"

Wednesday, January 29, 7 PM | Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

Co-sponsored by Outside the Box [Office] and USC Women’s Student Assembly

Screening followed by Q&A with director Laetitia Belmadani moderated by Lyn Boyd-Judson, director of the Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics

Lili's Journey started with two sisters' simple quest to find candid answers about what it means to be a woman today, and evolved into a serendipitous voyage throughout the most diverse cultures, traditions and religions. What will it take to get on the road of this gender-equal society everybody seems to be talking about? 

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be.

MICHAEL IGNATIEFF: “In Search of a Global Ethic—Lessons From the Big Cities”

Levan Distinguished Lecture

Tuesday, January 21, 2014, 4 PM | USC University Club at King Stoops Hall

Reception following at 5 PM

Co-sponsored by the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education, USC Asian Pacific American Student Assembly, USC Association of Public Diplomacy Scholars

Global cities—and Los Angeles is a global city—have vital lessons to teach us about how leaders and ordinary citizens manage to find common ground and shared values over and above all the barriers of race, ethnicity, religion and economic circumstance that come between us. In this talk, Michael Ignatieff will share some of the ethical lessons to be learned when you listen to government leaders, police, citizens and community activists as they negotiate and overcome differences and seek to generate the minimum common agreement we need in order to share the city.

Michael Ignatieff served in the Parliament of Canada and was leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. He currently holds joint appointments at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. He is also the Centennial Chair of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs’ “Ethics for a Connected World.” This project examines the ethical values human beings share across all our differences of race, religion, ethnicity, national identity and material wealth.

PAST FALL 2013 EVENTS: MEANING AND MORALS IN A MODERN WORLD

Film Screening: "A River Changes Course"

Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 7 PM | School of Cinematic Arts

Co-sponsored by the USC School of Cinematic Arts

Winner, World Cinema Grand Jury Prize: Documentary, Sundance Film Festival  

A River Changes Course tells the story of three families living in contemporary Cambodia who face hard choices forced by rapid development, and struggle to maintain their traditional ways of life as the modern world closes in around them.

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be.

“Creativity and the Clinical Imagination” - A Lecture by Nick Flynn

Thursday, September 26, 2013 4PM | Mayer Auditorium, Health Sciences Campus

Visions & Voices - The Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series

Join us for an afternoon with acclaimed author Nick Flynn, whose books include: Another Bullshit Night in Suck City (2004), a memoir of homelessness, and The Ticking is the Bomb (2010), a memoir of interviews with prisoners released from Abu Ghraib.  In his most recent book, The Reenactments, Flynn explores the filming of his first book, delving into neurobiology, human consciousness and the forming and re-forming of memory with each telling.  Throughout his work, Flynn seeks to expose truths, find connections and illuminate our humanity.

Organized by Pamela Schaff (Pediatrics and Keck Educational Affairs), Suraiya Rahman (Pediatrics), Erin Quinn (Family Medicine) and Lyn Boyd-Judson (Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics).

The Visions & Voices Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Event Series invites speakers who, through their creative or scholarly work, address some of the core issues facing the health of individuals and society. 

Nick Flynn will spend the afternoon of Wednesday, September 25th at the University Park campus visiting students studying nonfiction writing in the English department and terrorism and liberal democracy in the School of International Relations. 

Reception co-sponsored by the English Department and the School of International Relations

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics--DEMOCRATIC TRANSPARENCY AND STATE SECRETS: A Question of Values?

Wednesday, September 18, 2013, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Lunch Served

Program Director Professor Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Do extensive government surveillance programs of the sort recently revealed by Edward Snowden interfere withdemocratic citizens’ ability to exercise self-government? Would a government’s deploying secret interpretations of secret laws in secret courts be compatible with the rule of law? Should we grant our government the authority openly to conduct comprehensive surveillance of ourselves and our fellow citizens?

Coffeehouse Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists
John Dreher, Associate Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Michael H. Shapiro, Dorothy W. Nelson Professor of Law, USC Gould School of Law
Kevin Starr, University Professor and Professor of History, USC Dornsife
Ari Ratner, Fellow at Truman National Security Project, formerly with Obama Department of State; Tiffany Chang, Ph.D Candidate in Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Matthew Gratias, Ph.D Candidate in Political Science and International Relations, USC Dornsife

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. 

Film Screening: "Blood Brother"

Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 7 PM | The Ray Stark Family Theatre, SCA 108

Co-sponsored by the USC School of Cinematic Arts

Screening followed by a Q&A with director Steve Hoover 

Winner, Grand Jury Prize, Documentary, Sundance Film Festival 2013 
Winner, Audience Award, U.S. Documentary, Sundance Film Festival 2013

Rocky went to India as a disillusioned tourist. When he met a group of children with HIV, he decided to stay and devote his life to them.

“Documentaries don’t come any bigger-hearted than Blood Brother, a highly worked yet non-manipulative first feature for Steve Hoover that requires no string-pulling to achieve its inspirational impact.” —Dennis Harvey, Variety

The Cinema of Substance Series showcases meaningful films from around the world that explore who we are and how we might be.

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics--MINDLESS MEAT: A Technological Solution to a Moral Problem

Wednesday, October 30, 2013, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe | Wednesday, October 30th, Noon | Ground Zero Cafe

Program Director Professor Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Worldwide demand for meat is growing, particularly in the developing world.  But concerns about the detrimental environmental impact of expanded animal farming, the inefficiency of feeding livestock rather than humans directly, and imposing suffering on sentient beings have led companies to invest in developing mindless meat—lab-grown animal flesh that lacks sentience.  Is this a practical or morally desirable way of addressing these concerns?  Would it be better to discourage meat consumption altogether through educational, legal, or economic measures?

Coffeehouse Program Director and Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science

Panelists:
Varun Soni, USC Dean of Religious Life
Alida Liberman, PhD Student in Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Tok Thompson, Associate Professor of Anthropology, USC Dornsife

Levan Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. 

Carnegie Council International Student Photography Contest, 2013: Living With Differences

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its first International Student Photography Contest. The contest is part of Ethics for a Connected World, a three-year global education project in celebration of the 2014 Carnegie Council Centennial.

The Centennial project connects people across the globe in joint pursuit of Andrew Carnegie's vision for global responsibility—what we call a "global ethic." Is there such a thing? If not, should we try to create one? 

In a world with tremendous diversity of beliefs and cultures, how do we live together amicably?  Carnegie Council believes that part of the answer lies in pluralism—the appreciation of diversity and differences, with recognition of and respect for shared values.

The photography contest will be conducted via Carnegie Council's online Global Ethics Network, a social media platform for exploring the role of ethics in international affairs through multimedia resources.

PHOTO TOPIC: Pluralism, Living with Differences

CONTEST DEADLINE PASSED