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"Copenhagen" by Michael Frayn: A Staged Reading directed by Jack Rowe

Visions and Voices

Called “endlessly fascinating” by the New York Times, Michael Frayn’s Tony Award–winning play Copenhagen is a fictional account of a 1941 heated exchange between two physicists, exploring the moral questions of scientists working on nuclear weapons.
In a 1941 encounter in Copenhagen, physicists Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg exchanged heated words and profound ideas relating to the moral questions of scientists working on nuclear weapons. Michael Frayn’s Tony Award–winning play Copenhagen is a fictional account of that exchange. Ben Brantley of the New York Times called Copenhagen “endlessly fascinating...the most invigorating and ingenious play of ideas in many a year and a work of art that humanizes physics in a way no other has done.” The production will be directed by Jack Rowe, director of the BFA program in acting and associate dean of the USC School of Dramatic Arts. A pre-show lecture by Clifford V. Johnson, professor in physics and astronomy at USC Dornsife, will begin the evening.

Organized by the USC School of Dramatic Arts. Co-sponsored by the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the USC Brain and Creativity Institute.