Profile

Han’s research interests lie in social determinants of health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities and immigrants. In the Population, Health, and Place Ph.D. program, she explores how social, demographic, economic, behavioral and neighborhood characteristics impact healthcare access and cancer outcomes, particularly for Asian Americans and immigrants.

Her current research focuses on applying spatial methods to delineate ethnic enclaves in Los Angeles County by synthesizing multiple spatial data sources. Through this work, she examines how living in Asian enclaves intricately influences colorectal cancer diagnosis and survival outcomes for distinct Asian American subgroups. Her overall research goal is to understand the complex interplay of individual and neighborhood factors that shape health disparities among diverse populations and to inform policies and programs that promote equitable and improved health outcomes across the spectrum.

Before joining the Population, Health, and Place program, Han earned her bachelor’s degree in Public Affair Management from Renmin University of China. There she interacted with rural-urban migrants in Beijing and participated in research on public policy initiatives targeting migrant populations, which inspired her research interests in immigrants and their healthcare challenges.

She completed her Master of Public Policy degree at the University of Southern California where she gained experience in adopting quantitative methods and geospatial tools to evaluate neighborhood environment and associated health outcomes, including food deserts and obesity. She also worked with Asian Americans in Los Angeles local communities, developing projects aiming to boost caregivers’ well-being, healthcare access and knowledge of labor laws.

Education

Master of Public Policy, Sol Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California
Bachelor of Management, School of Sociology and Population Studies, Renmin University of China