Skip to main content

Problems Without Passports News

Problems without Passports: Rwanda

Courage After Genocide

July 17, 2013

On a quiet hilltop in southern Rwanda is a panorama of captivating beauty: rolling hills, pastures, open sky and on the horizon, small farms and pastoral villages. But the beauty is deceptive. This hilltop, the site of a…

In March, students traveled to Russia, where they crossed five time zones on the Trans-Siberian Railroad en route from Moscow to Lake Baikal in central Siberia. The trip included cultural sightseeing in Moscow and on-site lectures by the Russian Academy of Sciences on environmental issues affecting the lake. Photo by Francesca Martens.

Breaking the Ice in Siberia

June 5, 2013

Spring break tends to conjure up images of tropical beaches, sunshine and around-the-clock swimsuit fashion. There’s one thing it definitely does not bring to mind: Siberia. Putting the “alternative” in…

Arriving as a global health major at Keck School of Medicine of USC, Otana Jakpor decided to add a major in biological sciences in USC Dornsife after taking a Problems Without Passports (PWP) biology course at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. Photo by Erica Christianson.

Hard Work Meets Glamour

April 15, 2013

A Southern California native whose father is Nigerian, Otana Jakpor visited Nigeria for the first time last Christmas. In addition to spending time with cousins and extended family she didn’t before know existed, the…

Robert English, the new director of USC Dornsife’s School of International Relations, has tales to tell about his overseas exploits. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Front-row Seat to the World

November 8, 2012

There’s no learning experience quite like getting out of the classroom — especially when the focus is on global politics. For Robert English, incoming director of USC Dornsife’s School of International…

The Arch of Sorrow marking the entrance to the museum built on the site of The Akmolinsk Camp for the Wives of the Traitors of the Fatherland (ALZHIR). Photo by Azade-Ayse Rorlich.

Steppes Ahead

October 1, 2012

Descending from the upholstered comfort of their van into the vast, windswept steppe of Northern Kazakhstan, six USC Dornsife students gazed about them at an abandoned guard tower and the futuristic-looking Arch of Sorrow…

This street art located near Callejón de Hamel in Havana is part of the photographer/graffiti artist known as JR’s "Wrinkles in Time" project featuring images of elders from the region. In Cuba, there is a disproportionate amount of elderly as a result of migration and low birth rates. Photo by Karen Graciela Calderon.

Contradicting Cuba

September 25, 2012

In a joint effort between USC Dornsife and the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, 20 USC students traveled to Havana, Cuba, this summer for a 10-day study of the island’s political, economic and…

Problems Without Passports: Politics and Security in the Arctic

North Pole Politics

August 31, 2012

The Arctic is the land of the midnight sun, ice-covered ocean and permafrost. Here, at the tippy top of the northern hemisphere, is a remote and beautiful landscape at the heart of a complex situation. As polar ice caps are…

Saving an Endangered Language

Saving an Endangered Language

August 14, 2012

As the old school bus wound its way through the steep mountain passes, the students gazed out the windows at the lush, tropical topography unfolding before them. At the outskirts of the village, the bus shuddered to a halt at…

Digging Turkey

Clues from Ancient Antioch

August 16, 2011

Lynn Swartz Dodd and her students had heard rumblings of a 10th-century cemetery deep in the brush in the Hatay region of Turkey near Antakya, the ancient city of Antioch. But no one had ever translated the inscribed…

Students in the 2011 Guam and Palau class show their USC Dornsife pride. Photo by Jim Haw.

Dispatches from the Oceans of Micronesia

May 19, 2011

What happens when 24 students take to the ocean to study the fragile ecosystems of Micronesia’s coral reefs? Anyone can soon find out as dispatches from the field are posted to Scientific American’s…