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July 2012 Media Mentions

 

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

USA Today featured “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox” by Lois Banner of history and gender studies, a new biography about Marilyn Monroe which includes never-before-seen photos of the actress. Monroe was the sex icon of her time, and is as renowned now as she was then, Banner said in another USA Today story. The book was also covered by The Scotsman (U.K.), Panorama (Armenia), Tribuna Hoje (Brazil), Vipado (Brazil), Bem Parana (Brazil), Correio da Manha (Portugal), TVI24 (Portugal), Asian News International and U-T San Diego.

Los Angeles Times reviewed “Shadow of Night” by Deborah Harkness of history. The Arizona Republic ran a Q&A with Harkness about the book.

Daily Mail (U.K.) ran an op-ed by Lois Banner of history and gender studies. Banner is the author of the new biography “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”

Scientific American featured a USC Dornsife video on the biomechanics of Olympic diving. In the video, Jill McNitt-Gray of biological sciences and biomedical engineering explained how athletes perform successful dives.

The Straits Times (Singapore) cited David Kang, director of the USC Korean Studies Institute, about Western depictions of North Korea.

CBS News interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s recent comments at the London Olympics.

The Boston Globe quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about people’s political views coloring their view of the economy.

The Christian Science Monitor quoted Stanley Rosen of political science about filmmakers making expensive changes to a “Red Dawn” remake in order to avoid offending China.

LiveScience quoted Robert Girandola of biological sciences about genetics determining success in so-called “non-skill” Olympic sports like running, swimming or weightlifting.

The Arizona Republic quoted John Callaghan of biological sciences about the use of the Olympics as a foreign relations tool during the Cold War.

Svenska Dagbladet (Sweden) highlighted the book “MM — Personal: From the Private Archive of Marilyn Monroe” by Lois Banner of history and gender studies.

The Sun cited a study by Michael Messner of sociology and gender studies finding that women’s sports received only 1.6 percent of sampled TV sports coverage.

 

July 28-30, 2012

The New York Times ran an op-ed by John Monterosso of psychology and a colleague, about research on how people view the link between the brain and moral culpability.

Los Angeles Times highlighted “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox” by Lois Banner of history and gender studies, which delves into Marilyn Monroe’s popular image as a “dumb blonde.” Banner said that while fascination with Monroe increased in the mid-’70s, the last 12 years have seen an exceptional explosion in interest. “The paradox is she was many, many things at the same time ... some of that was in her nature, some of that was constructed,” Banner told BBC Radio (U.K.). “She was in fact very, very intelligent.” The book was also covered by Current TV’s “The Young Turks” and Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

ABC Radio (Australia) featured Daniel Lidar of electrical engineering systems, chemistry, and physics and astronomy, and his research on quantum computing. The story highlighted a quantum computer housed at the Viterbi School’s Information Sciences Institute.

 

Friday, July 27, 2012

The Huffington Post featured “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox” by Lois Banner of history and gender studies.

The Huffington Post ran a column written by Nake Kamrany of economics, and USC students Jessica Greenhalgh and Justin McGinnis on American health care policy.

Limerick Leader (Ireland) cited research by Timothy Biblarz of sociology and a New York University colleague on children raised by same-sex couples.

The Huffington Post mentioned that former USC Dornsife graduate student Kenneth Hayworth is developing a computer simulation to duplicate a human brain.

 

Thursday, July 26, 2012

NBC News Los Angeles affiliate KNBC-TV featured USC’s success in the Olympic games. “A USC athlete has won a gold medal in every single Summer Games since 1904,” said Oxford professor and USC alumnus Walter Ladwig. Ladwig attended a reception for USC athletes and alumni, hosted by the USC Alumni Club of London. Since 1904, USC has had roughly 400 Olympians and won 123 gold, 78 silver and 61 bronze medals. Thirty-nine Trojans will compete in the London 2012 Olympics. “I came out of USC, and we train hard and we fight on,” said USC Dornsife alumna and Olympic sprinter Carol Rodriguez. KNBC also ran a blog post and Storify summary highlighting the reception.

Los Angeles Review of Books ran a podcast featuring “A People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Pulido of American studies and ethnicity and USC Dornsife alumnae Laura Barraclough and Wendy Cheng. The podcast follows Pulido and Cheng on a walking tour of sites from the book, as they explain each locale’s significance to L.A. cultural history.

Discovery News featured research by Sergio Sanudo-Wilhelmy of biological sciences and earth sciences and colleagues, finding that “vitamin deserts” in the ocean have an effect on plankton levels. International Business Times and ScienceDaily also featured the study.

The New York Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about rhetoric in the 2012 presidential race.

Bloomberg News quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, on how voters view the economy in relation to the presidential race.

Newsday reviewed “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox,” a biography on Marilyn Monroe by Lois Banner of history and gender studies.

 

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Science Codex featured research by Joshua West, Wilford and Daris Zinsmeyer Early Career Chair in Marine Studies and assistant professor of earth sciences, finding that chemical weathering — the process that generates resources that support and shape life on Earth — occurs in both soils and rocks. The study found that landscapes without soil can still play a significant role in sustaining life.

The Guardian (U.K.) quoted Juan de Lara of American studies and ethnicity about labor conditions at Walmart.

Bloomberg Businessweek quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about how the economy could affect the 2012 presidential race.

NPR Austin, Texas, affiliate KUT-FM aired a Q&A with Deborah Harkness of history about her new book “Shadow of Night.”

 

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Europa Press (Spain) featured research by Sergio Sanudo-Wilhelmy of biological sciences and earth sciences and colleagues, finding that “vitamin deserts” in the ocean have an effect on plankton levels. The story reported that Sanudo-Wilhelmy and his team are the first to identify the long-hypothesized vitamin-depleted zones. They found a lack of vitamin B at certain depths of the ocean off the coast of California and Baja Mexico. The researchers believe that the vitamin deficiency could influence red tides, a kind of toxic algae bloom. This is another twist to what limits life in the ocean, Sanudo-Wilhelmy said.

Los Angeles Times cited David Kang of international relations and business, director of the USC Korean Studies Institute, about a lack of information about North Korea.

Indo-Asian News Service (India) quoted Chauntelle Tibbals, visiting scholar in sociology, about the use of social media in the adult film industry.

North County Times cited Kevin Starr, University Professor and professor of history and policy, planning and development, about the role that history plays in defining a people, and the role that state parks play in preserving that history.

 

July 21-23, 2012

The Guardian (U.K.) ran an excerpt from the Marilyn Monroe biography “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox,” written by Lois Banner of history and gender studies. St. Louis Post-Dispatch reviewed the book.

Los Angeles Times quoted Leo Braudy, University Professor and Leo S. Bing Chair in English and American Literature and professor of English, about the influence of World War I on art.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about rhetoric in the presidential race after the shootings in Aurora, Colo.

KPCC-FM’s “Off-Ramp” highlighted the “Easterlin paradox,” named after Richard Easterlin, University Professor and professor of economics, which indicates that happiness doesn’t continually increase along with a country’s average income.

 

Friday, July 20, 2012

J. Weekly featured the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education’s IWitness program, an online application that lets high school students and teachers search through the institute’s Holocaust survivor testimonies. The story covered a student film made using testimony from iWitness, connecting a high school student with a Holocaust survivor.

NBC News Philadelphia affiliate WCAU-TV featured Deborah Harkness of history and her new book, “Shadow of Night.” The book combines historical fact with fantasy, following the story of a historian sucked into a world of magical intrigue. “I teach at the University of Southern California, and I was really thinking of my own students when I wrote the books,” Harkness said. “Shadow of Night” is the second installment of a trilogy; Warner Bros. has already bought the rights to all three books. The Plain Dealer highlighted a discussion of the book to be hosted by Harkness.

Contra Costa Times highlighted a hike led by Robert de Groot of earth sciences to teach grade school science teachers more about the San Andreas Fault. The hike was part of the STEM Service Learning Institute, a regular series of conferences for Southern Californian science teachers.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the two sides battling over California Proposition 37, which would require labeling of genetically modified food.

CNN interviewed Chauntelle Tibbals, visiting scholar in sociology, about adult film stars using Twitter to reach out to fans.

NPR’s “Talk of the Nation” interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Mitt Romney’s potential vice presidential picks.

Reason.tv interviewed Karen Sternheimer of sociology about anxious cultural reactions to video games and other forms of media throughout history. Gameranx cited Sternheimer.

 

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

CNN ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Mitt Romney’s choices for vice presidential running mate. Schnur wrote that it’s less likely Romney will select someone like Florida Sen. Marco Rubio or New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who are potentially riskier choices than former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty or Ohio Sen. Rob Portman. "Romney’s most important decision as a presidential candidate will be to decide whether it is more dangerous to be risky or risk-averse," Schnur wrote.

National Journal quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the role former Vice President Dick Cheney could play in the 2012 presidential election.

Minnesota Public Radio interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the methods used to get voters to the polls.

 

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Los Angeles Times quoted David Kang of international relations and business, director of the USC Korean Studies Institute, about North Korea taking small steps to open up to the world.

Associated Press quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about hot-button issues in the presidential race, including health care and the candidates’ relationships to Bain Capital and Solyndra.

United Press International quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the 2012 presidential campaign being the most expensive in American history.

Contra Costa Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about speculation that Condoleeza Rice could be Mitt Romney’s vice presidential running mate.

The Plain Dealer reviewed "Shadow of Night" by Deborah Harkness of history.

io9 mentioned that actor Bryan Cranston visited the USC Dornsife Department of Chemistry to prepare for his role as chemistry teacher Walter White on "Breaking Bad."

 

July 14-16, 2012

The Chronicle of Higher Education reviewed “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox,” a biography of Marilyn Monroe by Lois Banner of history and gender studies. The book investigates Monroe as a post-feminist figure. The Buffalo News also reviewed “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Kenneth Hayworth, a former USC Dornsife graduate student who is searching for a way to preserve the human brain and have it digitally uploaded to a computer. Hayworth began his studies at USC in 2003 and joined the lab of Irving Biederman of neurosciences, psychology and computer science, where he conducted fMRI research on the human visual system.

The New York Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about proposed reforms to the office of the presidency.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about political partisanship damaging both the Republican and Democratic parties.

 

Friday, July 13, 2012

USA Today highlighted the book "Shadow of Night" by Deborah Harkness of history.

DNAinfo mentioned that researchers at USC’s Brain and Creativity Institute are studying “Mirrorbox,” an art project that allows two people to control digital images of each other’s faces.

 

Thursday, July 12, 2012

India West reported that USC will create the first chair of Hindu studies in the United States funded by the Indian-American community. A $3.24 million gift from the Dharma Civilization Foundation will establish the Swami Vivekananda Visiting Faculty in Hindu Studies and the Dharma Civilization Foundation Chair in Hindu Studies at the USC Dornsife College, promoting the study of Indian civilization. “USC has a long history of welcoming and embracing people from a wide variety of cultures and creeds, backgrounds and beliefs,” said USC President C. L. Max Nikias.

The Plain Dealer reviewed "Moral Origins: The Evolution of Virtue, Altruism and Shame" by Christopher Boehm of biological sciences. The book tries to reconcile altruism with different understandings of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Boehm’s book suggests that altruism evolved out of the development of a human conscience, which in turn developed out of egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies. Forbes cited the book.

The Wrap quoted Stanley Rosen of political science about the possibility that Hollywood is sanitizing the world’s view of China in order to maintain a favorable relationship with the country.

 

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

USA Today reviewed "Shadow of Night" by Deborah Harkness of history. Harkness, a historian of science, married historical fact with supernatural fantasy while writing the book. The book is the second volume of a planned trilogy.

Forbes featured research by Andrew Curtis of American studies and ethnicity using geospatial video to collect data about disaster areas, which can be used in relief efforts. The story highlighted Curtis’ recent work studying the cholera outbreak in Haiti. Curtis used small, GPS-encoding cameras attached to car windows in order to record video and maps of risk hotspots that could spread the disease. These included open sewer trenches and potentially contaminated water on routes to local water pumps. “Ultimately, what you’re trying to do is identify where the riskiest locations are,” he said. The story also noted his previous work charting the recovery of neighborhoods hit by Hurricane Katrina. Prior to this, agencies like the Red Cross had to document disaster damage by hand on a paper “street sheet.”

CBS News quoted Ange-Marie Hancock of political science and gender studies about challenges facing Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

 

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

NPR News reviewed “Shadow of Night” by Deborah Harkness of history. The novel is the second in a planned trilogy that combines historical realism with fantasy and the supernatural. The review notes that Harkness, a historian of science, is the perfect person to pull of a mix that some readers have called “Harry Potter for intellectuals.”

CNN interviewed Stanley Rosen of political science about the relationship between Hollywood and China.

Politico quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about thinly veiled political campaign events.

Epoca (Brazil) quoted Pamela Starr of international relations about Enrique Pena Nieto, president-elect of Mexico.

 

July 7-9, 2012

The New York Times reviewed “Rez Life: An Indian’s Journey Through Reservation Life” by David Treuer of English. The book shifts from autobiography to Native American history and cultural study of the modern reservation.

USA Today included the novel “Shadow of Night” by Deborah Harkness of history, in a list of hottest new books. NPR’s “All Things Considered” featured the novel, noting that Harkness specializes in the history of science and medicine, writing books that blend historical realism and fantasy. Houston Chronicle and Female First (U.K.) ran Q&As with Harkness about her book. “Shadow of Night” was also covered by Daily Mail (U.K.), Phuket Gazette (Thailand), Entertainment Weekly, The Miami Herald, U-T San Diego, Variety, North County Times, Bucks County Courier Times and Chico Enterprise-Record.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reviewed “Pity the Beautiful,” a new poetry collection by Dana Gioia, Judge Widney Professor of Poetry and Public Culture at USC and former chair of the National Endowment of the Arts.

Los Angeles Times quoted Thomas Jordan of geological sciences about Vladimir Keilis-Borok, a scholar who has studied earthquake prediction.

Daily Mail (U.K.) cited David Schwartz of psychology and education about birthday party fight videos appearing on YouTube.

The Sacramento Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about college affordability as a hot political issue.

Los Angeles Times mentioned the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that 59 percent of California voters would vote against the high-speed rail project if given the chance to revisit it. Xinhua News Agency (China) also cited the poll.

The Huffington Post reported that Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity spoke at the National Council of La Raza Annual Conference about the Latino vote.

 

Friday, July 6, 2012

Los Angeles Times ran an op-ed by Pamela Starr of international relations about Enrique Pena Nieto, president-elect of Mexico.

United Press International featured research by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, and colleagues, on the benefits students get from daydreaming. “What are we doing in schools to support kids turning inward?” Immordino-Yang asked.

Los Angeles Times quoted Cecil “Chip” Murray of religion about L.A.’s Dunbar Hotel, which was built in 1928 by John Somerville, USC’s first African American graduate.

CBS News interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about critics of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

Associated Press quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the role the health care debate will play in the 2012 presidential election.

Al Jazeera interviewed Gerardo Munck of international relations about the role of the media in Latin American politics.

Bloomberg News quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney “playing defense.”

New Scientist cited Antonio Damasio, director of USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, about the human mind’s “core self,” a representation of an innate feeling of subjective awareness.

San Francisco Chronicle quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the role of the economy in the 2012 presidential election.

The Columbus Dispatch mentioned the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll finding that 55 percent of Californians would vote against the state high-speed rail project if given another chance.

 

July 4-5, 2012

Indo-Asian News Service featured research by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, and colleagues, on the benefits students get from daydreaming. The Huffington Post also featured the study.

The New York Times quoted Pamela Starr of international relations about Enrique Pena Nieto becoming president of Mexico. An op-ed Starr wrote on the subject was cited by Excelsior (Mexico), The Guardian (U.K.) and The Week.

Press Trust of India (India) quoted Kenneth Nealson of environmental studies,earth sciences and biological sciences about a recent study finding that the rise of mushrooms 300 million years ago may have stopped the formation of coal deposits. Wprost (Poland) and Science Codex also cited Nealson.

Politico quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the presidential election. A second Politico story cited Schnur.

Fox & Hounds Daily quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax proposal. A second Fox & Hounds Daily story quoted Schnur.

Los Angeles Times cited the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll finding that 59 percent of Californians would vote against a state high-speed rail project if given the chance to vote again. The story quoted Dan Schnur of the USC Dornsife College on the subject.

 

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Daily Mail (U.K.) featured research by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, and colleagues, on the benefits students get from daydreaming. The study was also covered by Asian News International, RedOrbit and Latinos Post.

The Wall Street Journal quoted Pamela Starr of international relations about the Mexican election. Excelsior (Mexico) and KPCC’s “Patt Morrison” also quoted Starr.

The Times of India (India) quoted Kenneth Nealson of environmental studies, earth sciences and biological sciences about a study suggesting that the arrival of fleshy fungi species may have stopped the formation of coal deposits roughly 300 million years ago.

The Arizona Republic quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about presidential priorities regarding immigration reform.

The Sacramento Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the U.S. Supreme Court health care ruling and the presidential race.

Science Codex highlighted research by Joshua West of earth sciences on weathering of the earth’s surface.

 

June 30-July 2, 2012

The Washington Post ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the impact of the Supreme Court’s health care decision on the presidential race.

Los Angeles Times quoted Judith “Jack” Halberstam of English, American studies and ethnicity, and gender studies about tough female characters on TV, and noted that she is the author of “Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal.”

National Journal mentioned that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, participated in a poll on whether recent immigration issues would prompt higher Latino voter turnout in November.

Odyssey Magazine featured work that Jill McNitt-Gray of biological sciences and biomedical engineering is doing with Olympic hopefuls to help them improve their athletic performance.