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Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics

Coffeehouse Conversations on Practical Ethics

ECONOMIC JUSTICE: IS OUR SYSTEM FAIR?

  • Date:
    Wednesday, March 12, 2014
  • Time:
    12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
  • Campus:
    University Park Campus
  • Venue:
    Ground Zero Performance Cafe

Summary:

Coffeehouse Conversations encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. Free lunch and open dialogue.
 
ECONOMIC JUSTICE: IS OUR SYSTEM FAIR?
There has lately been increasing discussion in the United States about economic inequality, as the gap between rich and poor has grown and upward mobility has declined. When a full time wage worker cannot support herself above the poverty line, still less her family, while corporate executives receive salaries higher by a factor of thousands than other workers at the same firm, it is natural to ask: Is there such a thing as too low a wage for work, too high a wage, or too great a differential in wages?

Description:

Coffeehouse Conversations encourage faculty, staff, graduate students and undergraduates from every part of our USC community to talk about the ethical questions of the day. Free lunch and open dialogue.
 
Program Director Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Political Science


RSVP: usc.edu/esvp (Code: coffeehouse)


ECONOMIC JUSTICE: IS OUR SYSTEM FAIR?
There has lately been increasing discussion in the United States about economic inequality, as the gap between rich and poor has grown and upward mobility has declined. With decreased funding for social support programs and increasing costs of higher education, some fear that the American Dream has become out of reach. One particular locus of debate concerns not welfare policy, but wage policy. When a full time wage worker cannot support herself above the poverty line, still less her family, while corporate executives receive salaries higher by a factor of thousands than other workers at the same firm, it is natural to ask: Is there such a thing as too low a wage for work, too high a wage, or too great a differential in wages? Should we legislate a higher minimum wage, or cap executive salaries? Or would doing so infringe liberty, or prove counterproductive, making the worst off worse off still?
 
Moderator:
Sharon Lloyd, Professor of Philosophy, Law and Political Science, USC Dornsife

Panelists:
Rhacel Parrenas, Professor of Sociology, USC Dornsife
Jonathan Quong, Associate Professor of Philosophy, USC Dornsife
Kevin Starr, University Professor and Professor of History and Policy, Planning and Development, USC Dornsife
Leandro S. Carvalho, Associate Economist at the Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR)