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Faith-Based Community Organizing in the U.S.: Bridging Communities and Building Power

Brad Fulton, Ph.D. candidate in sociology at Duke University

The 2011 National Study of Faith-Based Community Organizing Coalitions achieved a 94 percent response rate—gathering data on 178 of the 189 coalitions in the U.S. and demographic information on the 4,145 member organizations, 2,939 board members and 625 paid staff affiliated with these coalitions. In his presentation Fulton will use data from the national study to assess the current state of faith-based organizing and to describe how it has changed over the last decade. In particular, he will highlight the social composition of member organizations, board members and paid staff, and identify the issues the coalitions are actively addressing and the political levels at which they are addressing them. 

Brad Fulton's research focuses on the causes and consequences of racial, socioeconomic and religious diversity within civic organizations. Through his research he seeks to explain how some organizations become diverse and how diversity influences their performance. For his dissertation, Fulton conducted the National Study of Faith-Based Community Organizing Coalitions. His dissertation project has received awards from the American Sociological Association, the Academy of Management, the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Associations (ARNOVA), Organization Science and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS). Fulton’s 2011 article on Black Churches and HIV/AIDS, published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, received an award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

Faith-Based Community Organizing in the U.S.: Bridging Communities and Building Power

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Monday, March 3, 2014 03/03/2014 15:00:00 03/03/2014 17:00:00 6 Faith-Based Community Organizing in the U.S.: Bridging Communities and Building PowerBrad Fulton, Ph.D. candidate in sociology at Duke UniversityThe 2011 National Study of Faith-Based Community Organizing Coalitions achieved a 94 percent response rate—gathering data on 178 of the 189 coalitions in the U.S. and demographic information on the 4,145 member organizations, 2,939 board members and 625 paid staff affiliated with these coalitions. In his presentation Fulton will use data from the national study to assess the current state of faith-based organizing and to describe how it has changed over the last decade. In particular, he will highlight the social composition of member organizations, board members and paid staff, and identify the issues the coalitions are actively addressing and the political levels at which they are addressing them. Brad Fulton's research focuses on the causes and consequences of racial, socioeconomic and religious diversity within civic organizations. Through his research he seeks to explain how some organizations become diverse and how diversity influences their performance. For his dissertation, Fulton conducted the National Study of Faith-Based Community Organizing Coalitions. His dissertation project has received awards from the American Sociological Association, the Academy of Management, the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Associations (ARNOVA), Organization Science and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS). Fulton’s 2011 article on Black Churches and HIV/AIDS, published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, received an award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture
First Floor
free