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February 2011 Events

 

February 8, 2011
Significant Others: the Ape-Human Continuum in the
21st Century

 5 – 6 p.m.
Tyler Prize Pavilion,
Von KleinSmid Center
To secure your spot please RSVP to:
tcc@college.usc.edu
Walk-Ins welcome

Speaker:
Craig Stanford, USC College Professor of Anthropology and Biological Sciences

What does it mean to be human? One way of addressing this question is by considering ourselves in the light of the behavior and biology of the great apes. For the past 20 years, Craig Stanford’s work has investigated the underpinnings of the behavior of chimpanzees and gorillas, with implications for the roots of human behavior. He will consider recent developments in the field of human evolution and primate behavior and what they tell us about ourselves.

 

February 10, 2011
Growing Up and Growing Old in the Ancient World
4 – 6 p.m.
Doheny Memorial Library 240
To secure your spot please RSVP to: tcc@college.usc.edu
Walk-Ins welcome

Imagine what life was like before advances in medicine and improvements in nutrition extended life expectancies dramatically. This event focuses on the expected life spans and social roles considered appropriate for each age group; developments in each culture in understanding reasons for aging and death and the role of nutrition and healthy ways of living in slowing the process of aging; childhood and child-rearing practices and their relation to life expectancy; and actual practices connected with aging and mortality such as nutrition and medicine.

Speakers:

Ian Morris, Stanford University
Caleb Finch, Davis School of Gerontology
Solomon Golomb, Viterbi School of Engineering


February 15, 2011
HUMANS, ROBOTS AND WAR
Digitizing the Laws of War
4 – 6 p.m.
Doheny Memorial Library 240
To secure your spot please RSVP to: tcc@college.usc.edu
Walk-Ins welcome

A panel of guests including David Kaye of UCLA School of Law, Edwin Smith of USC Gould School of Law, and political scientist Amy Eckert of Metropolitan State College of Denver will explore the legal and political ramifications of the rise of robotic warfare. Both the need to address legal agency in light of artificial intelligence as well as the increased capacity to report on events on the battlefield will be discussed. How robots fit into both jus in bello as well as jus ad bellum questions is the focus.

Presented by The College Commons and the Center for International Studies

 

February 17, 2011
A Portrait of the Woman Writer in Old Age, 1770-1850
4 – 6 p.m.
Doheny Memorial Library 240
To secure your spot please RSVP to: tcc@college.usc.edu
Walk-Ins welcome

The representation and the legacy of women writers of previous centuries in their old age was curiously mixed. Professor Looser examines how a group of renowned British women writers were presented in portraits, as well as in print, turning later to a comparison of the self-presentations in old age of three long-lived writers: Hester Piozzi, Hannah More, and Elizabeth Carter. She concludes that visual and written representations of the writers ultimately played a part in their reception in late life.

Speaker:

Devoney Looser, University of Missouri

 

February 22, 2011
THE INFRASTRUCTURAL HUMAN
The Infrastructural Human: In Transit
2 – 4 p.m.
Doheny Memorial Library 240
To secure your spot please RSVP to: tcc@college.usc.edu
Walk-Ins welcome

Part II of the Infrastructural Series

As individuals and as collectives, humans are deeply reliant on technological systems, or infrastructures, that serve to feed us, salve our thirst, carry away our waste, keep us warm, and connect us with others. The development and extension of these systems, in turn, is fundamental both to individual experience and to the capacity for collective action. Strangely, these complex, extensive and fragile infrastructures of living typically do not enter into discussions among humanists, social scientists and natural scientists about the nature of the human, about our ethics and our politics. This event will seek to address this gap, focusing on how our systems of transportation — whether by air, land or sea — shape us as individuals and as members of a collectivity.

Panel discussion:
Robbert Flick (Roski School of Fine Arts, USC)
Vanessa Schwartz (Department of History, USC)
Lisa Schweitzer (USC School of Policy, Planning and Development)

 


 

 

Events and details subject to change. For more information, email tcc@college.usc.edu.