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Research Matters

USC Dornsife Research office weekly updates

Research Matters Archive

Awards

This information is based upon official award data from the Contracts and Grants office. It is provided to make you aware of the interesting research that is being conducted by our colleagues and that is supported through extramural sources.

• Vitaly Kresin, Physics and Astronomy, Controlling Reactions Alignment and Deposition of Cold Molecules, National Science Foundation.
• Hanna Damasio, Psychology, Neural Basis of Gestural Communication, Salk Institute For Biological Studies.
• Manuel Pastor, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity, The Economic Value of Naturalization, John S. & James L. Knight Foundation.
• William Berelson, Earth Sciences, Ocean Acidification: Collaborative Research, National Science Foundation.
• Bosco Tjan, Psychology, Eager: Separating Bold Nonlinearity from Neuronal Nonlinearity, National Science Foundation.
• Sarah Feakins, Earth Sciences, Collaborative Research: Evaluating Hydrologic and Ecologic Responses to Late-Glacial (9-33ka) Abrupt Climatic Transitions in the Coastal Southwest United States , National Science Foundation.
• Steven Finkel, Biological Sciences, Prokaryotic Genomic Instability, Indiana University.
• Steven Lopez, Psychology, Culture Neuroscience and the Course of Psychosis, University of California, Los Angeles.


Accolades

In addition to information about faculty grant awards, I am including other awards and accolades received by our fabulous faculty. This is not only to note accomplishments but to make all of us aware of the quality and diversity of College scholarship.

Adam Leventhal, Preventive Medicine and Psychology, has been selected as this year's recipient of the David Shakow Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Clinical Psychology from the American Psychological Association's Society for Clinical Psychology.


Announcements
You are invited to submit a proposal to the 2013 Teaching with Technology
grants program, which advances the university’s emergency preparedness
efforts. Grants will be awarded in the amount of $5,000 for the
development of a one-week online assignment.
The Center for Scholarly Technology (CST), which is part of the
Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) group of Information Technology
Services (ITS), administers the program, providing support and resources
for the grant projects.
All full-time members of the USC faculty teaching in the Spring 2013
semester are eligible to apply for this grant. To apply for a Course
Continuity in a Crisis (C3) grant, complete the online submission form
at: http://cst.usc.edu/services/tel/grants/spring_2013_c3_grants.html
All submissions must be received by 3:00 pm Wednesday, October 3, 2012.
Awards will be announced by Monday, October 29, 2012.
Guidelines for proposals and requirements for participation in the
program are available at:
http://cst.usc.edu/services/tel/grants/spring_2013_c3_grants.html
The C3 grants support USC’s efforts to maintain classes in an
emergency as described in the Office of the Provost memorandum sent to
USC faculty on October 5, 2010. The Office of the Provost provides
funding for this program. Learn more about maintaining your classes in
an emergency at: cst.usc.edu/services/emergencyprep.html
For questions about the Teaching with Technology C3 grants, please send
an email to cst@usc.edu.


Serve as an SC CTSI Pilot Funding Program Reviewer!
Help us award $1M/year in research funding
Why participate?
• Learn how an NIH-style study section works
• Become more successful in obtaining grants by using this knowledge
• Become a better mentor
• Become part of the transformative process in translational research
• Broaden your horizons and expand your network of collaborators
• And most importantly….

Ensure the continued availability of research funds through this program!
The Pilot Funding Program depends upon expert teams of volunteer reviewers.
Please consider becoming a part of this important process!
Questions? Contact ord@sc-ctsi.org.


Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching
http://www.baylor.edu/cherry_awards/
To honor outstanding classroom communicators. The winner receives $250,000 and must be in residence at Baylor during the 2014 fall or 2015 spring semester. Travel expenses and a furnished apartment will be provided. The winner’s home department receives $25,000.
Nominations are due November 1, 2012 via an online submission form https://www.baylor.edu/cherry_awards/index.php?id=52955
More than one nomination can come from USC. Three finalists are selected in spring 2013. Each finalist receives $15,000 and each finalist’s home department receives $10,000 to foster faculty development. Winners are announced in spring 2014.


Upcoming Funding Opportunities

- Scholarly Editions and Translations, National Endowment for the Humanities
http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/scholarly-editions-and-translations-grants
Scholarly Editions and Translations grants support the preparation of editions and translations of pre-existing texts and documents of value to the humanities that are currently inaccessible or available in inadequate editions. These grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods of a minimum of one year up to a maximum of three years. Projects must be undertaken by a team of at least one editor or translator and one other staff member. Grants typically support editions and translations of significant literary, philosophical, and historical materials, but other types of work, such as musical notation, are also eligible.

- Collaborative Research, National Endowment for the Humanities
http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/collaborative-research-grants
Collaborative Research Grants support interpretive humanities research undertaken by a team of two or more scholars, for full-time or part-time activities for periods of a minimum of one year up to a maximum of three years. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; field work; applications ofinformation technology; and technical support and services. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to the appropriate scholarly and public audiences. Eligible projects include • research that significantly adds to knowledge and understanding of the humanities; • conferences on topics of major importance in the humanities that will benefit scholarly research; • archaeological projects that include the interpretation and communication of results (projects may encompass excavation, materials analysis, laboratory work, field reports, and preparation of interpretive monographs); and • research that uses the knowledge and perspectives of the humanities and historical or philosophical methods to enhance understanding of science, technology, medicine, and the social sciences.

- Integrated Earth Systems, National Science Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12613
Integrated Earth Systems (IES) is a program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) that focuses on the continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems of the whole Earth system. The overall goal of the program is to provide opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics and complexity of Earth systems at a budgetary scale between that of a typical project in the EAR Division's disciplinary programs and larger scale initiatives at the Directorate or Foundation level. Specifically, IES will provide research opportunities for the study of Earth systems from the core of the Earth to the top of the critical zone with a specific focus on subsystems that include continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems at all temporal and spatial scales (NROES, 2012). IES will provide opportunities to focus on Earth systems connected to topics which include (but are not limited to) the continents; the terrestrial, surficial Earth systems including physical, chemical and biotic dimensions; linkages among tectonics, climate, landscape change, topography and geochemical cycles including core and mantle processes.

- Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Drug Abuse Research (R21), National Institutes of Health
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-297.html
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is issued by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH). The FOA is intended to support pilot, feasibility or exploratory research for up to 2 years in 4 priority areas, including: 1) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive medical system issues (e.g. opportunities to understand addiction services in the evolving health care system); 2) responses to emerging drug abuse-related HIV trends and topics (e.g. rapidly evolving drug abuse-related epidemics, time-sensitive policy or environmental changes); 3) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive criminal justice opportunities (e.g. new system and/or structural level changes) that relate to drug abuse and access and provision of health care service; and 4) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive prescription drug abuse opportunities (e.g., new state or local efforts). It should be clear that the knowledge gained from the proposed study is time-sensitive and that an expedited rapid review and funding are required in order for the scientific question to be answered.

- Drug Abuse Aspects of HIV/AIDS (R01, R03, R21), National Institutes of Health
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-293.html
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-294.html
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-295.html
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications to examine the drug abuse aspects of HIV/AIDS, including research on drug-related risk behaviors, addiction and HIV disease, and drug use/HIV-related co-morbidities and consequences. Applications are needed to identify and predict changes in the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS among injection and non-injection drug users and among their sexual partners; to develop and test interventions for primary and secondary HIV prevention, including drug treatment interventions; to improve HIV testing, counseling, and treatment services for those living with HIV/AIDS; and to address basic mechanisms involved in HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis in the context of drug abuse and addiction.

-- Integrated Earth Systems, National Science Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12613
Integrated Earth Systems (IES) is a program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) that focuses on the continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems of the whole Earth system. The overall goal of the program is to provide opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics and complexity of Earth systems at a budgetary scale between that of a typical project in the EAR Division's disciplinary programs and larger scale initiatives at the Directorate or Foundation level. Specifically, IES will provide research opportunities for the study of Earth systems from the core of the Earth to the top of the critical zone with a specific focus on subsystems that include continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems at all temporal and spatial scales (NROES, 2012). IES will provide opportunities to focus on Earth systems connected to topics which include (but are not limited to) the continents; the terrestrial, surficial Earth systems including physical, chemical and biotic dimensions; linkages among tectonics, climate, landscape change, topography and geochemical cycles including core and mantle processes.

-- Interdisciplinary Research in Hazards and Disasters, National Science Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12610
The overarching goal of Hazards SEES is to catalyze well-integrated interdisciplinary research efforts in hazards-related science and engineering in order to improve the understanding of natural hazards and technological hazards linked to natural phenomena, mitigate their effects, and to better prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters. The goal is to effectively prevent hazards from becoming disasters. Hazards SEES aims to make investments in strongly interdisciplinary research that will reduce the impact of such hazards, enhance the safety of society, and contribute to sustainability. The Hazards SEES program is a multi-directorate program that seeks to: (1) advance understanding of the fundamental processes associated with specific natural hazards and technological hazards linked to natural phenomena, and their interactions; (2) better understand the causes, interdependences, impacts and cumulative effects of these hazards on individuals, the natural and built environment, and society as a whole; and (3) improve capabilities for forecasting or predicting hazards, mitigating their effects, and enhancing the capacity to respond to and recover from resultant disasters.Hazards SEES seeks research projects that will productively cross the boundaries of the atmospheric and geospace, earth, and ocean sciences; computer and information science; cyberinfrastructure; engineering; mathematics and statistics; and social, economic, and behavioral sciences. Successful proposals will integrate across these multiple disciplines to promote research that advances new paradigms that contribute to creating a society resilient to hazards. Hazards SEES intends to transform hazards and disaster research by fostering the development of interdisciplinary research that allows for appropriately targeted data collection, integration, and management; modeling (including predictive models for real-time decision making); visualization and simulation; data analytics and data-driven discovery; real-time sensing; cross-cutting knowledge development; and synthesis of applicable models and theory. Proposals must demonstrate the inclusion of the appropriate expertise to address the research questions, hypotheses, and problems being posed. Hazards SEES research projects should be designed around one or more locations, identifiable hazards, and/or themes. Furthermore, Hazards SEES research should train the next generation of scientists for interdisciplinary hazards and disaster research.

-- Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology, National Science Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12608
The Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology Program (SGP) supports research in a wide variety of areas in sedimentary geology and paleobiology in order to comprehend the full range of physical, biological, and chemical processes of Earth's dynamic system. The program supports the study of deep-time records of these processes archived in the Earth's sedimentary carapace (crust) at all spatial and temporal scales. These records are fingerprints of the processes that produced them and continue to shape the Earth.For the years 2013-2017, the Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology Program will be sponsoring a two track opportunity that will consist of the normal SGP competition (Track 1) and bi-annually, a new track termed Earth-Life Transitions (ELT) (Track 2).Track 1: General Program: Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology supports general studies of: (1) the changing aspects of life, ecology, environments, and biogeography in past geologic time based on fossil plants, animals, and microbes; (2) all aspects of the Earth's sedimentary carapace - insights into geological processes recorded in its records and rich organic and inorganic resources locked in rock sequences; (3) the science of dating and measuring the sequence of events and rates of geological processes as manifested in Earth's past sedimentary and biological (fossil) record; (4) the geologic record of the production, transportation, and deposition of physical and chemical sediments; and (5) understanding Earth's deep-time (pre-Holocene) climate systems.Track 2: Earth-Life Transitions: In fiscal years 2013-2017, the Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology program is sponsoring a bi-annual second track opportunity termed Earth-Life Transitions (ELT) within the normal programmatic spring competition. The goals of the ELT track are: 1) to address critical questions about Earth-Life interactions in deep-time through the synergistic activities of multi-disciplinary science and 2) to enable team-based interdisciplinary projects involving stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleontology, proxy development, calibration and application studies, geochronology, and climate modeling at appropriately resolved scales of time and space, to understand major linked events of environmental, climate and biotic change at a mechanistic level.

-- RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN SPACE BIOLOGY, NASA
http://nspires.nasaprs.com/
This NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicits hypothesis-driven Space Biology research proposals for 1) Ground-Based Research Designed to Lead to Space Flight, 2) Rapid Turn-Around Space Flight Experiments 3) ISS Flight Experiments and 4) New Space Biology Investigations. NASA Space Biology experiments have one or more of the following primary goals: 1) to effectively use microgravity and the other characteristics of the space environment to enhance our understanding of basic biological processes; 2) to develop the scientific and technological foundations for a safe, productive human presence in space for extended periods and in preparation for exploration; and 3) to apply this knowledge and technology to improve our nation's competitiveness, education, and the quality of life on Earth. NASA Space Biology (SB) experiments will be designed to discover how space flight affects a diverse group of microorganisms, plants, and animals; study the effects of gravity (g) across the g-spectrum, i.e., from micro- to hyper-gravity; and characterize the biological effects of radiation, magnetic fields, and the interaction amongst species in the unusual environments of space and spacecraft. This solicitation (NRA NNH12ZTT001N), entitled, "Research Opportunities in Space Biology," will be available on or about September 30, 2012. This solicitation will be found by opening the NASA Research Opportunities homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ and then linking through the menu listings "Solicitations" to "Open Solicitations." Step-1 proposals are due on October 31, 2012 at 5 PM Eastern Time, and invited Step-2 proposals are due on December 19, 2012 at 5 PM Eastern Time. Proposals must be submitted electronically by an authorized official of the proposing organization. Proposers can use either NSPIRES (see URL above) or Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov ) for proposal submission. NASA’s selection of research projects will be guided by recommendations of the National Research Council’s 2011 Decadal Survey Report, “Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era” (http:www.nap.edu/catalog/13048.html ) All categories of U.S. institutions are eligible to submit proposals in response to this NRA. Principal Investigators (PIs) may collaborate with investigators from universities, Federal Government laboratories, the private sector, state and local government laboratories and other countries. Every organization that intends to submit a proposal in response to this NRA must be registered with NSPIRES, and such registration must identify the authorized organizational representative(s) who will submit the electronic proposal. Instructions on how to register in NSPIRES will be described in the NRA. Each electronic proposal system places requirements on the registration of principal investigators and other participants (e.g. co-investigators). Potential proposers and proposing organizations are urged to access the system(s) well in advance of the proposal due date(s) of interest to familiarize themselves with its structure and enter the requested information. Questions in regards to responding to this NRA may be addressed to the contacts referenced in the full solicitation document. This is a broad agency announcement as specified in FAR 6.102 (d)(2). Notwithstanding the posting of this opportunity at FedBizOpps.gov, nspires.nasaprs.com, or Grants.gov, NASA reserves the right to determine the appropriate award instrument for each proposal selected pursuant to this announcement. For technical information regarding the use of flight hardware: Dr. Howard G. Levine NASA ISS Ground Processing and Research Office Mail Code UB-C Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899 Phone: 321-861-3502Email: Howard.G.Levine@nasa.gov For technical information regarding ground to flight research: Dr. Jeffrey D. Smith Space Biology Project Scientist Mail Stop 236-5 NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 Phone 650-604-0880 Email: jeffrey.d.smith@nasa.gov Programmatic information for this NRA and information on New Investigation Proposals is available from: Dr. David L. Tomko Program Executive for Space Biology Life and Physical Sciences Division NASA Headquarters Phone: 202-358-2211 Email: dtomko@nasa.gov Additional NASA contracting information for this NRA is available from: Cassandra Williams Contract Specialist NASA Shared Services Center Email: cassandra.williams-1@nasa.gov Phone: (228) 813-6271

-- Science Support Office for the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), National Science Foundation
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12611
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) will serve to advance basic research in the marine geosciences and will be supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and several international partners. IODP builds on a rich legacy of scientific ocean drilling pioneered by NSF in the 1960's with the Deep Sea Drilling Project, which provided a test of the plate tectonic hypothesis and a basic reconnaissance of deep sea sediments and crustal rocks. This was followed in 1985 by the Ocean Drilling Program, which focused on examination of Earth, ocean and climate processes. The current Integrated Ocean Drilling Program commenced in 2003 and has served as an expanded program of scientific ocean drilling based on "Earth, Oceans and Life: Scientific Investigations of the Earth System Using Multiple Drilling Platforms and new Technologies; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Initial Science Plan, 2003 - 2013" (http://www.iodp.org/initial-science-plan ). IODP, expected to commence October 1, 2013 with the science plan available at http://www.iodp.org/Science-Plan-for-2013-2023/, builds upon lessons learned in the previous programs to build a multi-platform international program based on cooperation rather than integration. IODP planning for JOIDES Resolution operations will be conducted under a Facilities Governing Board rather than an integrated Science Advisory Structure, and management and funding for JOIDES Resolution operations will occur independently of the other IODP drilling platforms. The Facilities Governing Board (FGB) will be made up of scientists and governmental representatives of nations contributing to JOIDES Resolution operations, as well as representatives of the JOIDES Resolution science operator. The Facilities Governing Board will be advised by a Proposal Evaluation Panel (PEP), a Site Characterization Panel (SCP), and an Environmental Protection and Safety Panel (EPSP), and will be further served by a Site Survey Databank (SSDB). The FGB and its advisory panels will be utilized for proposal review by other science operators in IODP. The IODP Science Support Office will provide logistical support for the Facilities Governing Board and its advisory panels, manage and archive IODP Proposals and oversee their external review, and manage the SSDB.This solicitation seeks the services of a qualified organization to provide the IODP Science Support Office. The award, to be administered as a Cooperative Agreement, is intended to cover an initial five year period beginning on October 1, 2013. A Program Review will be held prior to completion of the initial period and the results will guide a decision to re-compete or renew the Cooperative Agreement for a second five year period.