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Natural Sciences News

Mark Thompson, professor of chemistry at USC Dornsife, and a pioneer in researching organic LEDs and organic solar cells, has received the Richard C. Tolman Medal for his outstanding contributions to chemistry. Photo by Max Gerber.

Color Him Smart

April 1, 2014

Chemist Mark Thompson’s innovative research into color technology has resulted in the development of energy efficient displays for smartphones. Thompson’s work in organic LEDs and organic solar cells has earned…

Key members of the new Chickpea Innovation Lab: USC Dornsife's Sergey Nuzhdin (center), professor of biological sciences Doug Cook (left), professor of plant pathology at UC Davis and director of the USAID research project, and Eric von Wettberg, assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at Florida International University. Photo by Susan Bell.

The Small But Mighty Chickpea

March 28, 2014

Bumping along the dirt roads of rural southeastern Turkey in a battered Jeep, Sergey Nuzhdin and his team of collaborators got an occasional glimpse of the plumes of smoke rising across the border in war-torn Syria. Their…

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang receives the Early Career Award, established to honor an individual no later than 10 years after receipt of a doctoral degree. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Early Career Award

March 27, 2014

USC Dornsife’s Mary Helen Immordino-Yang has been awarded the Early Career Award for 2014 by the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The international organization will confer the award for excellence in…

Meghan Miller’s research looked at the ancient geologic record of Eastern Australia, but it is applicable to the Pacific Northwest in the United States, the Mediterranean and southeast Asia. Photo by John Livzey.

Solving a Geologic Riddle

March 26, 2014

USC Dornsife scientist Meghan Miller is among an international team of researchers who used computer modeling to reveal, for the first time, how giant swirls form during the collision of tectonic plates, with subduction zones…

“Wild or Farmed? How to Sustain the Options for Your Dinner Table” was the title of a March 10 discussion in Newport Beach, Calif., highlighting the ways USC Wrigley Institute researchers are investigating the opportunities and challenges of aquaculture.

Wild or Farmed?

March 19, 2014

Since the 1980s, the Earth’s population has ballooned to 7 billion — a nearly 2 billion increase over three decades. Meanwhile, seafood consumption has remained constant with demand outpacing the amount of wild…

Students enrolling in the new master’s program in stem cell biology will study organisms such as these mouse kidney stem cells. Image by Lori O'Brien.

Master’s in Stem Cell Science

March 18, 2014

USC Dornsife students studying biological sciences or other disciplines may be interested in this news: this Fall, the university will offer the first master’s program in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine in…

USC Dornsife’s Pavitra Krishnamani is an embodiment of the USC experience, having taken leadership roles in many different groups, university-wide and in the community. Photo by Erica Christianson.

One Busy Student

March 18, 2014

Pavitra Krishnamani was 16 when she entered USC through the Resident Honors Program, but the teenager was wise enough to quickly get involved. “I think, in a way, I’ve helped build a curriculum for myself at USC,…

Like many residents of Molochio, a small Italian town which has one of the highest prevalences of centenarians in the world, Salvatore Caruso, 108, maintained a low-protein plant-based diet for the majority of his life.

Hamburger Blues

March 11, 2014

That chicken wing you’re eating could be as deadly as a cigarette. In a new study that tracked a large sample of adults for nearly two decades, researchers have found that eating a diet rich in animal proteins during…

Surveying the mountains of garbage surrounding her, alumna Julia McGinnis said, “I see energy. I see money.” Photos by John Livzey.

Trash Can

March 5, 2014

Smartly dressed in a sleeveless harlequin green fitted dress accented by jade-stoned, gold jewelry and patent leather high heels, Julia McGinnis gazed at a mound of waste 200-feet wide being smashed down by giant roaming…

A recent paper in the journal <em>Brain Pathology</em> led by USC Dornsife psychologist Margaret Gatz provides more evidence that there may not be a single smoking-gun cause of Alzheimer’s, but rather a range of potential causes to which we may be susceptible largely depending on our genetics.

Twin Pathologies

February 26, 2014

Despite widespread use of a single term, Alzheimer’s disease is actually a diverse collection of diseases, symptoms and pathological changes. What’s happening in the brain often varies widely from patient to…