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Jacob Soll

A Case for Balancing Your Checkbook

April 28, 2014

As the United States was spiraling into one of its worst financial collapses in history, Jacob Soll found an interesting parallel in France’s “Sun King.” The USC professor learned that Louis XIV, better…

Thoreau Prize winner T.C. Boyle, shown here at his Santa Barbara home, said he is pleased to receive the Thoreau Award recognizing the environmental themes running through his work. "It’s nice to know that somebody’s listening," he says. Photo by Philip Channing.

T.C. Boyle to Receive Thoreau Prize

April 28, 2014

T.C. Boyle, USC Writer in Residence and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English at USC Dornsife, has won a top prize for his exceptional talents in nature writing. PEN New England will present this year’s Henry…

From left: Casey Donovan, professor of biological sciences; post-doctoral scholars and lead authors MaryAnn Bohland-Matveyenko and Anne Jokiaho; and Alan Watts, professor of neurobiology. The research team's work on how the body detects hypoglycemia could have far reaching implications for the development of insulin therapies to treat diabetes. Photo courtesy of Casey Donovan.

The Diabetes Detectives

April 17, 2014

To the casual observer, the 14-year-old kicking a ball around in the park with his friends looked like he had energy to burn. But the boy has Type 1 diabetes, a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder that commonly manifests…

As many as 150,000 guests attended the 19th annual <em>Los Angeles Times</em> Festival of Books held at USC April 11 and 12. Photo by Gus Ruelas.

Music, Spirit and Truth

April 14, 2014

It’s that same pang of longing you feel after reading the last word in a great novel. You don’t want to close the book. The two-day Los Angeles Times Festival of Books celebrated creativity and the written word on…

Meghan Miller’s research looked at the ancient geologic record of Eastern Australia, but it is applicable to the Pacific Northwest in the United States, the Mediterranean and southeast Asia. Photo by John Livzey.

Solving a Geologic Riddle

March 26, 2014

USC Dornsife scientist Meghan Miller is among an international team of researchers who used computer modeling to reveal, for the first time, how giant swirls form during the collision of tectonic plates, with subduction zones…

Douglas Keeney (economics, '73; MBA '76) has authored or coauthored more than a dozen historical books, which examine events such as D-Day and the Cold War. His forthcoming book is <em>Lost in the Pacific: Epic Firsthand Accounts of WWII Survival Against Impossible Odds</em>. Photo courtesy of Douglas Keeney.

True Tales of Survival

March 14, 2014

Buoyed by only a life vest, the young American pilot bounced and bobbed in the cold, dark waters of the Pacific Ocean. Forced to abandon his aircraft earlier that afternoon after it was shot down by Japanese destroyers, it was…

Like many residents of Molochio, a small Italian town which has one of the highest prevalences of centenarians in the world, Salvatore Caruso, 108, maintained a low-protein plant-based diet for the majority of his life.

Hamburger Blues

March 11, 2014

That chicken wing you’re eating could be as deadly as a cigarette. In a new study that tracked a large sample of adults for nearly two decades, researchers have found that eating a diet rich in animal proteins during…

The Animated Plant

An Idea Blossoms

March 10, 2014

Antonia Szabari and Natania Meeker of French and Italian, and comparative literature, research plants as a life form in literature, and animated and science fiction films.

After studying Renaissance literature, Elizabeth Cantwell who is earning her Ph.D. in Creative Writing and Literature at USC Dornsife, became a Renaissance student herself by combining science with poetry in her dissertation. Photo by Matt Wyatt.

Physics + Literature = Poetry

March 4, 2014

Many Ph.D. students find the dissertation writing process taxing enough to inspire a break after graduation, but Elizabeth Cantwell hasn’t broken her stride. She’s already on her way to turning hers into a book. A…

A recent paper in the journal <em>Brain Pathology</em> led by USC Dornsife psychologist Margaret Gatz provides more evidence that there may not be a single smoking-gun cause of Alzheimer’s, but rather a range of potential causes to which we may be susceptible largely depending on our genetics.

Twin Pathologies

February 26, 2014

Despite widespread use of a single term, Alzheimer’s disease is actually a diverse collection of diseases, symptoms and pathological changes. What’s happening in the brain often varies widely from patient to…