Skip to main content

Publication News

Kwasi Connor: Sampling Mussels off Catalina Island

The Importance of Life's Day/Night Cycle

September 14, 2011

USC researchers were surprised recently to discover just how much the rising and setting of the sun drives life on Earth — even in unexpected places. The findings, which appear this month in the Proceedings of the…

In the experiment, people were given popcorn before entering a theatre – some buckets were fresh; others were stale.

Habit Makes Bad Food Too Easy to Swallow

September 8, 2011

Do you always get popcorn at the movies? Or snack while you’re on the couch watching television? A new paper by USC researchers revealed why bad eating habits persist even when the food we’re eating doesn’t…

USC Dornsife's Giorgio Coricelli measured activity in the brain associated with rewards and social reasoning.

Peer Pressure? It's Hardwired Into Our Brains

September 8, 2011

The rewards outweigh the risks — when you’re in a group, anyway. A new USC study explains why people take stupid chances, when all of their friends are watching, that they would never take by themselves. …

The first issue of <em>Ilios</em> featured four long-form essays. Topics included the Russia-Chechnya conflicts, an examination of Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophies, a discussion on the failures of the International Criminal Court, and an exploration of the symbols of justice in world mythology.

A Light on Political Thought

September 7, 2011

Beginning in Fall 2010, a small group of students and their faculty adviser, Anthony Kammas, gathered for meetings in a shady corner of the Carolyn Craig Franklin Garden on the north side of the Doheny Memorial Library. In…

Travis Williams, assistant professor of chemistry in USC Dornsife. Photo by Dennis Martinez.

USC Breakthrough in Hydrogen Fuel Cells

September 1, 2011

A team of USC Dornsife scientists has developed a robust, efficient method of using hydrogen as a fuel source. Hydrogen makes a great fuel because it can be converted easily to electricity in a fuel cell and because it is…

Daniel Walker speaks at the recent Passing the Mantle  Institute gathering for African American clergy and lay leaders at USC. Photo by Malllory Carra.

Keeping the Black Church of Los Angeles Alive

August 25, 2011

From the influence of President Barack Obama to the recession and housing crisis, the needs and realities of the African American community in Los Angeles have changed — and Daniel Walker believes that the Black Church…

USC Dornsife professor Larry Swanson is among the Society for Neuroscience's earliest members. Photo by Carin Baer.

Swanson Elected President of Society for Neuroscience

July 26, 2011

Larry Swanson, Milo Don and Lucille Appleman Professor of Biological Sciences in USC Dornsife, has been elected president-elect of the Society for Neuroscience. During his one-year term as president between 2012 and 2013,…

Quantum computing uses quantum bits, or qubits, to encode information in the form of ones and zeros.

USC Scientists Contribute to a Breakthrough in Quantum Computing

July 21, 2011

Scientists have taken the next major step toward quantum computing, which will use quantum mechanics to revolutionize the way information is processed. Quantum computers will capitalize on the mind-bending properties of …

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at the Brain and Creativity Institute housed in USC Dornsife, and alumnus Thomas Denson, who earned his Ph.D. in psychology from USC Dornsife in 2007, were recognized as “rising stars” by the Association for Psychological Science.

Making Their Mark

June 21, 2011

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at the Brain and Creativity Institute housed in USC Dornsife, and Thomas Denson, a USC Dornsife alumnus, were recently lauded by the Association for Psychological…

Alexander Benderskii, associate professor of chemistry and senior author of the new study in <em>Nature</em>.

Water’s Surface Not All Wet

June 8, 2011

Air and water meet over most of the earth’s surface, but exactly where one ends and the other begins turns out to be a surprisingly subtle question. A new study in Nature narrows the boundary to just one quarter of…