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Biological Sciences News

Michelle Arbeitman of biological sciences received a federal stimulus grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to help advance the understanding of the molecular genetics of reproductive behaviors and physiology in fruit flies.

The Fly Could Prove Fruitful for Good Health

December 8, 2009

Michelle Arbeitman, Gabilan Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, has received a $325,148 federal stimulus grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. The award enables Arbeitman to hire one…

There is Hope: The Proof is in the Plume

There is Hope: The Proof is in the Plume

October 8, 2009

Dr. Jane Goodall, internationally renowned anthropologist and world conservationist, filled Bovard Auditorium on Oct. 6 with both a capacity crowd and, more importantly, a renewed sense of hope for a world in need. People of…

David Dominguez, a 16-year-old senior at Animo Film and Theatre Arts Charter School in Los Angeles, and Laila Barada, a third-year Ph.D. candidate in oceanography in USC College, examine their Trichodesmium project in a lab. Dominguez was a participant in the College's 2009 USC Young Researchers Summer Program. Photo credit Pamela J. Johnson.

Nurturing Young Scientists

October 6, 2009

This fall, be on the lookout for possibly USC College's youngest researcher. He is David Dominguez, a 16-year-old student at Animo Film and Theatre Arts Charter School. The senior at the south Los Angeles high school is…

Sergio Sañudo-Wilhelmy, left, and Douglas Capone received a National Science Foundation grant to study the nutrient cycle of three lakes in California and Nevada. Photo credit Taylor Foust.

Lake Research That Isn't All Wet

October 2, 2009

The federal government may not have been able to save California from massive budget cuts, but at least a stimulus research grant will help scientists understand the biology of western lakes. USC College biologists Douglas…

Parker Cunneen (back left) of Philadelphia, Penn. and Alex Eby of Denver, Colo., slice open a sheep's kidney in a lab exercise for a seminar taught by Albert Herrera, professor of biological sciences. Photo credit Liz Gill.

A Slice of College Life

August 31, 2009

Inside a science lab at USC, two high school students stared at a preserved sheep kidney on a tray. Looking like a giant chili bean, the organ is roughly the size of a computer mouse. Wearing blue rubber gloves, April Watts…

A Real Dracula Story

A Real Dracula Story

August 27, 2009

Research, discovery and publishing in a prestigious journal are not as easy as 1-2-3. However, an outstanding mentor and a well-equipped lab made this feat possible for doctoral student Fei Jiang.   The mentor is Myron…

The Younger Side of Microbiology

The Younger Side of Microbiology

June 10, 2009

According to the National Science Foundation, 80 percent of jobs in the future will require some math and science skills. "Math and science are the new foundational literacy for everyone," said Tom Luce, chief executive…

Impending graduate and salutatorian Brenda Nuyen will enter medical school in the fall. Photo credit Dietmar Quistorf.

A White Coat is in Her Future

May 11, 2009

This summer, salutatorian Brenda Nuyen wants to learn how to surf. By recently mastering skateboarding, she feels up to the challenge. "I've been told this summer is my last free summer until retirement," said Nuyen, who…

John Tower, associate professor of biological sciences, received a grant from the National Institute on Aging to study the effects of aging on fruit flies. Photo credit Laurie Hartzell

A Flying Fountain of Youth

March 27, 2009

Fruit flies may be small enough to squish with your finger when they invade your kitchen, but these tiny creatures may soon play an important role in answering the question: Why does one person live longer than another? John…

Team leader and USC College scientist Katrina Edwards. Photo credit Philip Channing

Iron From the Deep May Feed Oceans

February 9, 2009

Iron dust, the gold of the oceans and rarest nutrient for most marine life, can be washed down by rivers or blown out to sea or — a surprising new study finds — float up from the sea floor. The…