Skip to main content

Biological Sciences News

USC College's Susan Forsburg has received the 2011 Roche Diagnostics Alice C. Evans Award from the American Society of Microbiology. Photo credit Eric O'Connell.

Susan Forsburg Recognized for Commitment to Women in Science

February 25, 2011

Susan Forsburg, professor of biological sciences in USC College, has received the 2011 Roche Diagnostics Alice C. Evans Award from the American Society of Microbiology (ASM) for her contributions to the advancement of women in…

Biological Sciences faculty earn exceptionally high priority scores from the National Institutes of Health. Top row from left: Myron Goodman, Norman Arnheim. Bottom row, from left: Susan Forsburg, Sergey Nuzhdin and Frank Alber.

Molecular and Computational Biology on the Cutting Edge

February 25, 2011

Faculty in USC College’s Department of Biological Sciences earned exceptionally high priority scores from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) during the past year, which will translate to generous funding for their…

Speed Heals

Speed Heals

November 17, 2010

Both the rate and direction of axon growth in the spinal cord can be controlled, according to new research by USC College's Samantha Butler and her collaborators. The study, "The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Roof Plate…

Donal Manahan, professor of biological sciences, is the new vice dean of students in USC College. Photo credit Phil Channing.

Dean Howard Gillman Appoints First Vice Dean of Students for USC College

November 15, 2010

Dean Howard Gillman announced today that he has appointed Donal Manahan, professor of biological sciences, as the first vice dean of students in USC College of Letters, Arts & Sciences. In his new role, Manahan will…

Emily Smail, a doctoral candidate in the USC College marine environmental biology program, stands near a water sampling system on the deck of the research vessel Kilo Moana near Hawaii. Photo credit Eric Webb.

Essential Vitamins in the Marine Environment

October 21, 2010

Two USC College biologists have received support from the National Science Foundation to examine the conditions that lead to the synthesis of B vitamins in the marine environment and the influence of those vitamins on marine…

Emily Liman, associate professor of neurobiology at USC College and senior author of the study. Photo credit Laurie Moore.

Sparkling Drinks Spark Pain Circuits

September 29, 2010

You may not think of the fizz in soda as spicy, but your body does. The carbon dioxide in fizzy drinks triggers the same pain sensors in the nasal cavity as mustard and horseradish, though at a lower intensity, according to…

Cool Science

Cool Science

August 12, 2010

At the bottom of the Earth — the planet's coldest, driest, windiest place — the sky radiates a lavender-yellow hue in the midnight sun.  Whiter than milk, the blanket of ice seems infinite. Amid the…

New Study Examines the Brain's Wiring

New Study Examines the Brain's Wiring

August 10, 2010

The brain has been mapped to the smallest fold for at least a century, but still no one knows how all the parts talk to each other. A study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences answers that question for a small…

Sarah Bottjer, professor of biological sciences and psychology, discovered in her latest study that the basal ganglia pathway in zebra finches has two parallel circuits, rather than a single neural circuit as previously thought. Photo credit Eric O’Connell.

A Real Tweet

July 22, 2010

Loud and lively singers, some liken the sound of finches to toy trumpets -- ka-ching, beep-beep, oi, a-ha, or da-de-da! Both male and female zebra finches sound off in chattering trills and calls. However, it is only the male…

Lin Chen, professor of biological sciences and chemistry, aligns a protein crystal on an X-ray diffractometer. He uses X-ray crystallography to analyze the molecular details of key proteins and their complexes in physiological and disease processes. Photo credit Max S. Gerber.

Crystal Clear

July 16, 2010

Tuning out the noise of fellow passengers and the incessant hum of the turbojet engine, Lin Chen pored voraciously over the pages of James Watson's The Double Helix. The words and ideas flowed from the book's pages, drowning…