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Biological Sciences News

“I have never been happier about being wrong,” said El-Naggar, corresponding author of a new study in the <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em> that shows the key feature in bacterial nanowires are not hair-like features, or pili. Photo by Matt Meindl.

Bacterial Nanowires Not Pili

August 20, 2014

For the past 10 years, scientists have been fascinated by a type of “electric bacteria” that shoots out long tendrils like electric wires, using them to power themselves and transfer electricity to a variety of…

USC Dornsife's Donal Manahan (left), who served as chief scientist for many research expeditions to the Antarctic, has been awarded an honorary fellowship by Bangor University in Wales. Here, he stands with Bangor University Vice Chancellor John Hughes during the ceremony. Photo courtesy of Bangor University.

Manahan Named Honorary Fellow

July 22, 2014

Donal Manahan, professor of biological sciences and vice dean for students at USC Dornsife, has been appointed an Honorary Fellow of Bangor University in Wales. Manahan was honored for his contributions to science and in…

USC Dornsife Dean Steve Kay, Hashem Pesaran, Kenneth Nealson and Ray Stevens are among those deemed by Thomson Reuters to have the most scientifically influential minds in the world.

World’s Most Influential Scientists

July 17, 2014

Four researchers at USC Dornsife have been named by Thomson Reuters as having “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” for 2014. Based in New York City, the multinational media and information firm…

The Moore Foundation study includes computational expert Zhenfeng "Jay" Liu (left), who joined the project after earning his Ph.D. from Penn State, and USC Dornsife postdoctoral researcher Ramon Terrado, a Ph.D. from Université Laval (Québec, Canada). Photo by Richard Hoops.

Venus Flytrap of the Sea

June 19, 2014

A team of USC Dornsife biologists affiliated with the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies is working on a $1.2 million study of marine organisms that are the microscopic equivalent of the Venus…

Tackling health issues from dental disease to cancer, faculty and students connect with people throughout the world. Illustrations by Richard Mia for <em>USC Dornsife Magazine</em>.

A Wealth of Health

June 19, 2014

After a catastrophic 7.0 magnitude earthquake ripped through Haiti in 2010, crews posted signs warning against drinking contaminated river water. But since most of the population could not read, the caution went largely…

Artist Julie Selan’s reconstruction of Zanda fauna from the Pliocene epoch. Image courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Arctic Fox, Woolly Rhino and Three-toed Horse

June 17, 2014

For the past 2.5 million years, the Earth has experienced millennia-long cold and warm cycles that collectively have become known as the Ice Age. During cold periods, continental-scale ice sheets blanketed large tracts of the…

“We could not predict that prolonged fasting would have such a remarkable effect in promoting stem cell-based regeneration of the hematopoietic system,” said Valter Longo, corresponding author of a recent study in <em>Cell Stem Cell</em>. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

The Benefits of Fasting

June 10, 2014

In the first evidence of a natural intervention triggering stem cell-based regeneration of an organ or system, a study in the June 5 issue of Cell Stem Cell shows that cycles of prolonged fasting not only protect against…

Caleb Smith, a 16-year-old local high school student, won the opportunity to participate in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, or ISEF. He developed his research working in the laboratory of USC Dornsife’s John Tower. Photo by Misty Mercier.

Encouraging Young Scientists

June 6, 2014

As Caleb Smith watched the video of a Sudanese land mine victim using a prosthetic arm to eat unassisted for the first time in seven years, he was struck by the ability of science to fundamentally change a human life. Smith,…

USC Dornsife's Douglas Capone and Linda Duguay, both of biological sciences, traveled to Saudi Arabia to spearhead a collaborative research project with King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). Here they are pictured aboard a KAUST research vessel. Photos courtesy of Doug Capone and Linda Duguay.

Plugging into the Red Sea

May 22, 2014

Sailing across the Red Sea, USC Dornsife’s Douglas Capone and Linda Duguay hoped to get an up-close view of the reddish blooms created by cyanobacteria, which give the water its distinctive, eponymous hue. “The…

Doug Capone's research looks at the role and importance of marine microbes in major biogeochemical cycles, particularly those of nitrogen and carbon. In particular, he has shown nitrogen fixation — the process by which nitrogen is converted to ammonia — to be a key biogeochemical process in several marine ecosystems. Photo by by Taylor Faust.

Capone to Receive Top Biosciences Award

May 5, 2014

Doug Capone, William and Julie Wrigley Chair in Environmental Studies and professor and chair of biological sciences, has been honored with the 2014 DuPont Industrial Biosciences Award in Applied and Environmental…