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Brain And Creativity Institute News

Henrike Moll (left) and Morteza Dehghani of psychology with books and toys they will use when they interview children for their study on how humans create alternative worlds to make decisions. Photo by Peter Zhaoyu Zhou.

Pretending: Not Just Play

July 24, 2014

We all wonder what might have been. How would reality be different if a certain event had not occurred? If you had taken that job or married that person? “People especially tend to do this when a negative event happens,…

Selfie-Esteem

May 5, 2014

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang receives the Early Career Award, established to honor an individual no later than 10 years after receipt of a doctoral degree. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Early Career Award

March 27, 2014

USC Dornsife’s Mary Helen Immordino-Yang has been awarded the Early Career Award for 2014 by the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The international organization will confer the award for excellence in…

USC Dornsife's Mary Helen Immordino-Yang receives the Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science from Nobel laureate Phillip Sharp, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), at the group’s annual meeting. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

USC Dornsife Scientists Awarded

February 25, 2014

Better qualified than anyone to judge effective science outreach, the leading society for public engagement with science presented one of its signature honors to a young USC Dornsife professor Feb. 14 in Chicago. Mary Helen…

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang of USC Dornsife emphasized the importance of getting the public interested in the sciences: "We do this work ultimately so that it can benefit society." Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Engaging Professor

January 8, 2014

Mary Helen Immordino-Yang of USC Dornsife’ Brain and Creativity Institute has received the 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Early Career Award for Public Engagement With Science and…

“The somatic marker idea turned out to be relevant to understand complex human behavior. I am pleased to see it recognized,” University Professor Antonio Damasio said. The medal is on the right. Damasio photo by John Livzey.

Damasio Wins Grawemeyer Award

December 4, 2013

University Professor Antonio Damasio, who proposed that emotions play an integral role in human reasoning and decision-making, has won the 2014 Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. Damasio, the David Dornsife Chair in…

With a $1.5 million grant from the Mathers Foundation, University Professor Antonio Damasio of USC Dornsife is leading a study to understand how the axon insulator myelin affects the ability to process feelings in the brain. Photo by Philip Channing.

More Than a Feeling

November 25, 2013

The Brain and Creativity Institute (BCI) based at USC Dornsife has received a $1.5 million grant from the Mathers Foundation to investigate the neurobiology of feelings at the cellular level.  One of the fundamental…

Named a 2013 “Rising Star” by the Association of Psychological Science, Darby Saxbe, assistant professor of psychology at USC Dornsife, measures fluctuations in cortisol levels and uses neuroimaging to study how relationships with family and close friends affect health and well-being. Photo by Susan Bell.

Under the Skin

November 20, 2013

It’s difficult to forget the harrowing images of emaciated, hollow-eyed Romanian orphans whose plight was revealed after the fall of Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu’s brutal regime in 1989. “When children…

University Professor Antonio Damasio of USC Dornsife led a panel on the brain and creativity before scientists from throughout the world. Here, he is seen in his office at the USC Brain and Creativity Institute, housed in USC Dornsife. Photo by Philip Channing.

The Creativity Machine

November 18, 2013

Antonio Damasio, University Professor, David Dornsife Chair in Neuroscience and professor of psychology and neurology at USC Dornsife, spoke about the neuroscience of creativity during a recent conference held in San Diego…

The new USC Dornsife study examined activity in the so-called “pain matrix” of the brain, a network that includes the insula cortex, the anterior cingulate and the somatosensory cortices — regions known to activate when an individual watches another person suffer.

I Feel Your Pain

October 23, 2013

Counterintuitive findings from a new USC Dornsife study show that the part of the brain that is associated with empathizing with the pain of others is activated more strongly by watching the suffering of hateful people as…