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Cancer Research News

Matthew Pratt's research aims at understanding and stymieing cancer. Photo by Susan Bell.

Recognition for Pratt’s Work

November 18, 2014

Six years into his career at USC Dornsife, Matthew Pratt is on a roll — gaining attention for cutting-edge research aimed at understanding and stemming cancer. Pratt’s research focuses on glycosylation, the…

Valter Longo, professor of biological sciences at USC Dornsife with a joint appointment at the USC Davis School of Gerontology, researches genes that control aging. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Rock of Ages

January 8, 2014

Growing up in Genoa, Italy, Valter Longo spent countless hours emulating the guitar style of Jimi Hendrix. At 16, he moved to Chicago to take jazz guitar lessons before heading to the University of North Texas to continue his…

Mark Thompson, professor of chemistry, materials science and environmental sciences at USC Dornsife, speaks at the recent UCLA-USC-Caltech Nanotechnology & Nanomedicine Symposium about his groundbreaking research on nanoribbon biosensor chips for cancer diagnosis. Photo by Emily Bieghler.

Tiny Technology — Huge Results

October 28, 2013

Sometimes the smallest tools are required to tackle the biggest problems. At the forefront of innovative research on cancer treatment and regenerative medicine, experts from the top research institutions in the greater Los…

USC Dornsife's Charles McKenna and Myron Goodman research crystal structures for the repair enzyme, DNA polymerase beta (seen here). The enzyme contains an inhibitor molecule (shown in yellow) which forms a complex with DNA. It is designed to selectively block polymerase beta DNA synthesis to kill cancer cells, while ensuring survival of normal cells. Image courtesy of Boris Kashemirov.

Killing Cancer

October 16, 2013

Chemotherapy offers cancer patients hope of a cure, or at least of remission. The problem with the treatment is that all too often a hard-won remission is only temporary. “A typical pattern is that people take the drug,…

Named a <em>ChemComm</em> 2013 Emerging Investigator, USC Dornsife’s Matt Pratt received a Michael J. Fox Foundation grant for research into treatment for Parkinson’s disease. Photo by Susan Bell.

Emerging Investigator

July 24, 2013

USC Dornsife’s Matthew Pratt, assistant professor of chemistry and biological sciences, has been named a 2013 Emerging Investigator by ChemComm, a leading chemical sciences journal published by the Royal Society of…

USC Dornsife's Susan Forsburg served as the corresponding author on a recent paper about mutated cells that continue to replicate their DNA even after treated with chemotherapy drugs. Photo by Eric O'Connell.

Mutant Cells Dig in Their Heels

November 20, 2012

Certain mutated cells keep trying to replicate their DNA — with disastrous results — even after medications rob them of the raw materials to do so, according to new research from USC. New imaging techniques…

Nicos Petasis, Harold and Lillian Moulton Chair in Chemistry and professor of chemistry in USC Dornsife, collaborated with researchers in many disciplines in a published study unveiling a new drug to combat ovarian cancer. Photo by Alexandra Bissonnette.

Hope Against Ovarian Cancer

October 11, 2012

Scientists at USC have discovered a new type of drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer that works in a way that should not only decrease the number of doses that patients need to take, but also may make it effective for…

USC Dornsife's Valter Longo's latest study published in <em>PLOS One</em> shows that short-term fasting in mice appears to improve the effectiveness of radiation and chemotherapy in treating gliomas. Here Longo works in his laboratory. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Fasting and Radiation Therapy

October 1, 2012

A new study from USC Dornsife researchers is the first to show that controlled fasting improves the effectiveness of radiation therapy in cancer treatments, extending life expectancy in mice with aggressive brain…

Matthew Pratt, assistant professor of chemistry and biological sciences in USC Dornsife, has been named a 2012 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator for his discovery of a possible link between metabolism and protein modification in cancer. Pratt's focuses on understanding how chemical modification affects the function and expands the diversity of proteins, which participate in nearly all operations in a cell. Photo by Ben Pack.

Risk and Reward

June 8, 2012

The Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation supports young scientists with creative, groundbreaking ideas leading to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Unlike many larger organizations, it funds research in its earliest…