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Marine Biology News

Named Penelope by researchers, this elephant seal is one of many fitted with a GPS tracking tag. These devices can be used to monitor potential climate change indices such as temperature increases. The tags are temporarily attached with glue and do not hurt the seals. ©Nicole Teutschel, courtesy of Tagging of Pacific Predators or TOPP.

Climate Change Hits the Beach

October 15, 2012

“Climate change is already here,” warned Douglas Capone, William and Julie Wrigley Chair in Environmental Studies and professor of biological sciences in USC Dornsife. “And it’s going to affect…

Dennis Hedgecock's 1986 article in <em>Bulletin of Marine Science</em> was one of the most cited articles in the journal's 60-year history. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

Academic Journal Honors USC Professor's Contributions

November 9, 2011

Early in his career, USC marine biologist Dennis Hedgecock explored a pair of hypotheses that since have significantly influenced science’s understanding of how marine animals pass genes on to future generations. In…

USC College marine biologist David Caron attends a COSEE-West workshop in January. Photo by Peter Tuddenham.

Ocean Education for the Masses

March 21, 2011

USC College scientists are working with staff and volunteers at informal education centers across Southern California to bring the results of their ocean research to education programs aimed at the general public. Funded…

Biodiversity Targets for the Future

Biodiversity Targets for the Future

October 22, 2010

In Sichuan province, China, there is an abundance of orchards but no bees. "Thousands of people are hired to climb fruit trees and hand-pollinate the flowers with small brushes, because natural pollinators like bees have been…

Cool Science

Cool Science

August 12, 2010

At the bottom of the Earth — the planet's coldest, driest, windiest place — the sky radiates a lavender-yellow hue in the midnight sun.  Whiter than milk, the blanket of ice seems infinite. Amid the…

Donal Manahan is the director of the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies and the study’s senior author. Photo credit Roger Snider.

Donal Manahan Studies Growth of Oysters

March 24, 2010

In physical, as in financial growth, it’s not what you make but what you keep that counts, USC marine biologists believe. Their study of genes associated with growth in oysters suggests that slow-growing animals waste…

The Machine That Goes Ping

The Machine That Goes Ping

April 3, 2009

USC's 454 Life Sciences DNA sequencer is rather humble for a half-million dollar marvel on the frontier of science. "It's the machine that goes ping — sounds really impressive but looks really plain," said John…

Deep-Sea Expedition Begins

Deep-Sea Expedition Begins

November 1, 2008

Seldom has one scientist dived so deep to look at something so small. For three weeks this month, USC College’s David Caron will join an expedition to study marine life around deep-sea hydrothermal vents. His specialty:…

Donal Manahan Appointed Wrigley Director

Donal Manahan Appointed Wrigley Director

February 1, 2008

Donal Manahan, professor of biological sciences in USC College, has been appointed director of the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies. In an announcement Feb. 25, USC College Dean Howard Gillman named Manahan to…

Fish Moving Off the Menu

Fish Moving Off the Menu

January 1, 2008

The last fish you ate probably came from the Bering Sea. But during this century, the sea’s rich food web — stretching from Alaska to Russia — could fray as algae adapt to greenhouse conditions. “All…