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Moh El-naggar News

“I have never been happier about being wrong,” said El-Naggar, corresponding author of a new study in the <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em> that shows the key feature in bacterial nanowires are not hair-like features, or pili. Photo by Matt Meindl.

Bacterial Nanowires Not Pili

August 20, 2014

For the past 10 years, scientists have been fascinated by a type of “electric bacteria” that shoots out long tendrils like electric wires, using them to power themselves and transfer electricity to a variety of…

Researchers in Provost Professor of Biological Sciences Scott Fraser’s laboratory use confocal microscopy to capture a 3D projection of a live, developing zebrafish heart at 54 hours post-fertilization. A mitochondrial protein (green) and the nuclei (red) of the heart muscle cells are visible by a protein-trapping approach developed by Fraser’s team. Photo by Le Trinh.

ConvURGENT Bioscience

May 29, 2014

Like an artist sharing her latest Starry Night, geneticist Le Trinh invited her colleague to come see her experiment. Hunched over a microscope, Vikas Trivedi watched what looked like tiny bumper cars meandering inside a…

Marc Green, research lab technician at the USC Center for Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis (CEMMA), offers training sessions for new users of the GE DeltaVision OMX Blaze. Photo by Robert Perkins.

Mind-Bending Microscope

February 21, 2014

Thanks to an interdisciplinary, cross-campus effort, USC Dornsife is now home to one of the most advanced microscopes in the world — a device that pushes beyond what was once believed to be the boundary of visible light…

The breakthrough research of USC Dornsife’s Moh El-Naggar has earned him the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stage of their careers. Photo by Matt Meindl.

A Presidential Honoree

January 28, 2014

USC Dornsife’s Moh El-Naggar first got an inkling he was being considered for a presidential award several months ago when he received an email requesting his permission to authorize an FBI background check. But it…

Jan Amend, who is affiliated with the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, housed in USC Dornsife, is leading a $6.7 million project to develop approaches for detecting and characterizing microbial life in the subsurface. Photo by Michelle Salzman.

Life Underground

August 1, 2013

USC Dornsife researchers have embarked on a five-year project to look for microorganisms hundreds of meters below the surface — in deep mineshafts, boreholes and other sites — as part of the search for the limits…

Cable bacteria in the mud along the seafloor. Photo by Mingdong Dong, Jie Song and Nils Risgaard-Petersen/Aarhus University.

Living Power Cables Discovered

October 25, 2012

A multinational research team has discovered filamentous bacteria that function as living power cables in order to transmit electrons thousands of cell lengths away. The Desulfobulbus bacterial cells, which are only a few…

Jan Amend, professor of earth sciences and biological sciences in USC Dornsife, will lead an interdisciplinary team of researchers in an investigation into what life teems within Earth's subsurface biosphere. Their approach could become a template for collecting evidence of life or past life on extraterrestrial planetary bodies such as Mars. Photo by Michelle Salzman.

Detecting Life Beyond Earth

September 21, 2012

A team of researchers led by Jan Amend, professor of earth sciences and biological sciences in USC Dornsife, has been selected to join the prestigious NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI), an organization of competitively…

USC Dornsife's Moh El-Naggar (center) was voted among the 10 most promising young scientists by Popular Science magazine. Photo by Allison V. Smith.

Brilliant One

September 19, 2012

USC Dornsife scientist Moh El-Naggar has been selected as one of Popular Science’s 2012 Brilliant 10, the magazine’s annual honor roll of the 10 most promising young scientists. El-Naggar is featured in the…

Still images and videos of arsenic sulfide nanofibers growing under a microscope help Ian McFarlane and Julia Lazzari-Dean to better understand the microbes’ properties and potential applications. These materials could hold the key to creating new nanomaterials that do jobs not yet imagined.

Energy in a Bottle

April 22, 2012

    Undergraduate researcher: Julia Lazzari-Dean Major: Chemistry Year: Sophomore Student funding sources: Provost’s Undergraduate Research Fellowship and Women in Science and…