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By examining whole genome sequencing data of living Europeans in more than 40 populations, USC Dornsife’s Peter Ralph has found that the genetics of all human beings are linked more closely than previously believed. Photo by Susan Bell.

We Are Family

August 7, 2013

New research by Peter Ralph of USC Dornsife has confirmed that everyone on Earth is related to everyone else on the planet. So the Trojan Family is not just a metaphor. Turns out, we’re also linked by genetics more…

USC Dornsife's Remo Rohs (center) with Ph.D. candidates Carolina Dantas (holding a 3-D model of transcription factors bound to DNA) and Tianyin Zhou (holding a 3-D model of a nucleosome). Dantas and Zhou have each coauthored three of the papers that Rohs published in the last two months. Photo by Susan Bell.

1-D to 3-D Genomics

June 10, 2013

Since his recent selection as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Remo Rohs continues to demonstrate the research and creativity necessary to become a leader in the scientific community. In April and May, the assistant…

Susan Forsburg, professor of molecular biology in USC Dornsife (left), led a team in a study recently published in <em>Cell Reports</em>, that shed light on the centromere — the center of the “X” shape of a chromosome. Forsburg's former Ph.D. student, Pao-Chen Li (right), now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, was among the co-authors. Photo by Eric O’Connell.

The Synergistic Effect

March 11, 2013

USC Dornsife scientists have discovered how two different structural apparatuses collaborate to protect repetitive DNA when it is at its most vulnerable — while it is being unzipped for replication. The centromere…

USC Dornsife's Susan Forsburg served as the corresponding author on a recent paper about mutated cells that continue to replicate their DNA even after treated with chemotherapy drugs. Photo by Eric O'Connell.

Mutant Cells Dig in Their Heels

November 20, 2012

Certain mutated cells keep trying to replicate their DNA — with disastrous results — even after medications rob them of the raw materials to do so, according to new research from USC. New imaging techniques…

Remo Rohs of USC Dornsife studies the different shapes of two Hox-DNA binding sites. Photo by Jie Gu.

The Shape of Things to Come

December 8, 2011

A USC Dornsife scientist has developed an innovative method of predicting the shape of DNA, for the first time making it expedient to do so on a genomic scale. “DNA can have variations in shape, which are read by…

Decoding Cancer: One Cell at a Time

Yeast Unleashed

July 21, 2010

There is good reason Susan Forsburg's laboratory smells of sourdough. The USC College biologist is among the most prominent fission yeast researchers in the country. Inside her lab are hundreds of petri dishes containing…

Oscar Aparicio, associate professor of biological sciences in USC College, received a federal stimulus grant, which will support additional researchers and enable him to upgrade his equipment to the highest-quality technologies available for microarray data analyses. Photo credit Philip Channing.

Funds to Help in the Fight Against Cancer

December 23, 2009

Oscar Aparicio, associate professor of biological sciences in USC College, has received a $316,417 federal stimulus grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. The award will enable him to hire a…

A Real Dracula Story

A Real Dracula Story

August 27, 2009

Research, discovery and publishing in a prestigious journal are not as easy as 1-2-3. However, an outstanding mentor and a well-equipped lab made this feat possible for doctoral student Fei Jiang.   The mentor is Myron…

The Machine That Goes Ping

The Machine That Goes Ping

April 3, 2009

USC's 454 Life Sciences DNA sequencer is rather humble for a half-million dollar marvel on the frontier of science. "It's the machine that goes ping — sounds really impressive but looks really plain," said John…

Genome ID Method Extended to Humans

Genome ID Method Extended to Humans

October 1, 2006

A mathematical discovery has extended the reach of a novel genome mapping method to humans, potentially giving cancer biology a faster and more cost-effective tool than traditional DNA sequencing.A student-led group from the…