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Faculty Research News

Robert Campany, chair and professor of religion and professor of East Asian languages and cultures, studies the religions of ancient China, focusing on the Daoist, Buddhist and Confucian traditions. Photo credit Pamela J. Johnson

May You Stay Forever Young

May 26, 2009

Before plastic surgery and botox, an ancient culture had a different way of dealing with the quest for eternal youth. Why not simply live forever? In medieval China, third century B.C., people believed it possible to be 800…

Arieh Warshel

Arieh Warshel Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

May 5, 2009

Arieh Warshel, a pioneer in the field of computational biophysics and USC College veteran of more than 30 years, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. One of 72 new members selected at the 146th annual meeting…

Tyler Prize laureates Richard Alley (left) and Veerabdran "Ram" Ramanathan celebrate during a reception held at the Tyler Environmental Prize Pavilion at USC. Photo credit Pamela J. Johnson.

Tyler Prize Laureates On Global Warming

May 1, 2009

Scientists estimating ice-sheet shrinkage and subsequent sea-level rising would occur in the next century believe the phenomenon is happening now, glaciologist Richard Alley said during a lecture at USC. "They said the ice…

The Neuroscience Era

The Chatter of Neurons

April 23, 2009

Close your eyes. Extend your arms and let your fingertips explore your surroundings. What textures and shapes do you feel? What can you infer about your immediate environment simply through touch? Just as your hands glide…

Karen Halttunen of USC College was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship that will enable her to finish her book about 19th century New Englanders. Born in Massachusetts, Halttunen has always felt a deep connection to New England. Photo credit Taylor Foust.

Setting the Groundwork for a Guggenheim

April 22, 2009

Karen Halttunen, professor of history in USC College, has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship to support her book about 19th century New Englanders and their sense of identity in relation to place. "I see this project in terms of…

David Kang is director of the Korean Studies Institute and professor of international relations and business. Photo courtesy David Kang.

It’s a First for David Kang and USC

April 20, 2009

The Strategic Initiative for Korean Studies (SIKS) has awarded funding for new projects in 2009 and has selected David Kang, director of the Korean Studies Institute (KSI) and professor of international relations and business…

Antonio Damasio, director of the Brain and Creativity Institute in USC College. Photo credit Philip Channing.

Nobler Instincts Take Time

April 14, 2009

Emotions linked to our moral sense awaken slowly in the mind, according to a new study from a neuroscience group led by corresponding author Antonio Damasio, director of the Brain and Creativity Institute in USC College. The…

Shakespeare scholar Bruce Smith stands in front of the “spatial relations alphabet” and holds up a clay ball with the same symbols. He uses the unusual alphabet to jolt his students into looking at language differently. Photo credit Taylor Foust.

‘Thou Whoreson Zed! Thou Unnecessary Letter!’

April 7, 2009

Although Shakespeare is famous for his cerebral language, USC College's Bruce Smith wants his students to absorb the Bard with not only their minds — but their entire bodies. The Dean's Professor of English…

The Machine That Goes Ping

The Machine That Goes Ping

April 3, 2009

USC's 454 Life Sciences DNA sequencer is rather humble for a half-million dollar marvel on the frontier of science. "It's the machine that goes ping — sounds really impressive but looks really plain," said John…

John Tower, associate professor of biological sciences, received a grant from the National Institute on Aging to study the effects of aging on fruit flies. Photo credit Laurie Hartzell

A Flying Fountain of Youth

March 27, 2009

Fruit flies may be small enough to squish with your finger when they invade your kitchen, but these tiny creatures may soon play an important role in answering the question: Why does one person live longer than another? John…