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Faculty Research News

Ojibwe indians in Minnesota use a birch bark canoe for transport circa 1910. USC Dornsife's David Treuer fuses historical facts, reportage and memoir in his new book <em>Rez Life</em> to give a detailed history of Indian reservations in the U.S. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Center.

Life on the Rez

February 8, 2012

In the 1950s in the small village of Ball Club, Minn., a school lunch program created a nasty rift. The area was mostly populated by Indians, recounted David Treuer. Students who resided on tribal land were entitled to a free…

<em>Cleopatra</em> was a critical flop, but starred Elizabeth Taylor as the most powerful woman in the ancient world. USC Dornsife's M. G. Lord discusses <em>Cleopatra</em> in her new book, <em>The Accidental Feminist: How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice</em> out Feb. 7.

Behind Those Violet Eyes

February 3, 2012

Just for a hoot, M. G. Lord and a group of friends rented a mid-century modern house in Palm Springs, Calif., for Memorial Day weekend. Lord had brought a box of Elizabeth Taylor movies, and popped in a DVD. “We were…

"We want undergraduates, graduates and colleagues not to take their visual surroundings for granted. And to think intelligently and questioningly about what use we make of images. And, in a sense, the use that images make of us." - Kate Flint, Provost Professor of English and Art History, leader of the USC Dornsife 2020 research cluster “Seeing 20/20: The USC Visual Studies Research Institute.”

The Future...Not What It Used to Be

January 31, 2012

A New American Narrative The year is 2042. If you are white and living in the United States, you are a minority, according to Census Bureau projections. “By 2042, the U.S. is going to look completely different in terms…

Research associate Shayantani Mukherjee and USC Dornsife professor Arieh Warshel liken the rotation of F1-ATPase to that of a fan.

USC Scientists Build Working Model of Life’s Engine

January 27, 2012

Researchers at USC have built a theoretical working model of the cellular engine that powers all life. The model will allow scientists to better understand the forces of life at the molecular level and potentially replicate…

USC Dornsife's Katrina Edwards, left, examines a sample during a deep-sea expedition. Photo by Bill Crawford.

Life Discovered on Dead Hydrothermal Vents

January 27, 2012

Scientists at USC have uncovered evidence that even when hydrothermal sea vents go dormant and their blistering warmth turns to frigid cold, life goes on. Or rather, it is replaced. A team led by USC Dornsife microbiologist…

Richard Brutchey’s research at USC Dornsife focuses on the synthesis, surface chemistry and applications of inorganic nanocrystals for solar energy conversion and energy storage. In addition to being named a 2012 Emerging Investigator by <em>ChemComm</em>, he was recently presented with a Raubenheimer Junior Faculty Award, the highest award bestowed to faculty in USC Dornsife. Photo by Michelle Salzman.

Nod to the Nanoscale

January 26, 2012

Richard Brutchey, assistant professor of chemistry, was recently lauded for his work as a researcher by ChemComm, a leading chemical sciences journal published by the Royal Society of Chemistry. ChemComm named Brutchey a 2012…

Jeb Barnes, associate professor of political science in USC Dornsife and a Dornsife Faculty Fellow, discusses congressional efforts to reform asbestos litigation in his new book, Dust-Up: Asbestos Litigation and the Failure of Commonsense Policy Reform (Georgetown University Press, 2011). Barnes photo by Alexandra Bissonnette.

What Lies Beneath the Asbestos Crisis

January 23, 2012

When thousands of workers filed lawsuits against employers in search of asbestos injury compensation, Congress planned to create a national social insurance program for asbestos claims but failed. A new book written by USC…

USC Dornsife's Bosco S. Tjan (above) and USC graduate student Anirvan S. Nandy theorized in a new paper that peripheral vision is hindered by the visual experience formed in the brain during eye movements. Photo by Dietmar Quistorf.

USC Scientists Keep Their Eyes on Peripheral Vision

January 19, 2012

Two USC scientists are bringing peripheral vision into focus, showing that the way the brain sharpens its attention while the eyes are in motion leads to false assumptions about how objects should look. The eye’s…

From left, corresponding authors Alain Goeppert, George Olah and G. K. Surya Prakash collaborated on the project with other USC researchers. Photo by Pamela J. Johnson.

Material Cleans Carbon Dioxide from the Air

January 19, 2012

A team of USC scientists has developed an easy-to-make material that can scrub large amounts of carbon dioxide from the air. One day in the future, large artificial trees made from the material could be used to lower the…

Understanding the structure of the human genome is critical to understanding its function as a whole, according to USC Dornsife’s Lin Chen.

Scientists Create First 3-D Map of Human Genome

January 3, 2012

For the first time, scientists have developed a method for generating accurate three-dimensional models of the entire DNA strand of a cell, known as a genome. The genome plays a central role in the functions of almost all…