Skip to main content

Faculty Research News

Photo courtesy of Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library (1833-1841). “Butterflies And Moths” From Larva To Adult.

The Transgender Moment?

May 26, 2016

It’s a moment that most of us experience several times a day. And when we’re in public, most of us proceed almost without thinking to the nearest door bearing our corresponding gender signifier, the all-familiar…

DNA was first identified in the late 1860s by Swiss chemist Friedrich Miescher, but nearly a century would pass before the famous three-dimensional double-helix structure would come to the fore. Fast forward another six decades to the present day, and science has laid bare the human genome in its entirety. Illustrations by Janice Kun.

Molecular You

May 24, 2016

Upbringing and circumstance — and the consequences of a lifetime of decisions — all shape us to varying degrees. And the environment undoubtedly plays some role. But, at the core of it all is our genetics, the…

The virtual nature of the online world can lull users into a false sense of security. But the dangers are real, and cyberspace can leave a lasting mark on incautious visitors. Illustrations by Matthew Pla Savino.

Personal Net Worth

May 24, 2016

For many parents, the inexorable approach of puberty and those awkward teenage years sends a clear signal that it is time for “the talk.” The conversation in mind, however, has nothing to do with birds or…

Millennials are often stigmatized as “slacktivists” who prefer using a hashtag or signing a petition on social media to being truly engaged. Illustrations by Justin Renteria.

Defying the Labels

May 24, 2016

The biggest generation since the boomers, U.S. millennials — those born between 1980 and 2000 — are the most technologically advanced and racially and ethnically diverse group in history. They are arguably also the…

Chronic pain and subsequent addiction to prescription pain killers are emerging as among the greatest health crises in the United States. Joan Broderick’s research seeks to manage pain through outlets other than medication.

USC Dornsife psychology researcher collaborates on pill-free protocol for treating chronic pain

May 19, 2016

Chronic pain has emerged as one of the most onerous health problems facing Americans — leading to depression, loss of livelihood and, in many cases, addiction to prescription pain killers. According to an investigative…

A recognized authority on the interface between science and policy, Amber Miller is the new dean of USC Dornsife, effective Aug. 16. Photo courtesy of Amber Miller.

Physicist Amber Miller named new dean of USC Dornsife

May 18, 2016

Amber Miller, dean of science for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University, has been named the dean of USC Dornsife, effective Aug. 16. USC Provost Michael Quick announced the appointment today on behalf of USC…

Subjective well-being refers to a person’s happiness or satisfaction with life. Photo by Richard Walker.

Scientists identify genes connected to well-being, depression and neuroticism

May 18, 2016

An international group of more than 190 scientists who analyzed the genomes of nearly 300,000 individuals have found genetic variants that may influence our sense of well-being, depression and neuroticism. The study is one of…

Members of the Oneida Community playing croquet on the lawn of their imposing Mansion House in Madison Country, New York. Photo courtesy of Oneida Community.

From free love to well-set table

May 10, 2016

Oneida. For most Americans the name conjures up fine silverware. Few are aware that behind this secular symbol of middle-class respectability lies the story of a 19th-century religious community endowed with radical notions of…

A new USC study finds that children in LA County are growing up more economically segregated than 20 years ago.

Families with kids increasingly live near families like them

May 10, 2016

Neighborhoods are becoming less diverse and more segregated by income — but only among families with children, a new study has found. Study author Ann Owens, an assistant professor of sociology, examined census data…

Sol Golomb, University Professor, Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics and holder of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Chair in Communications. Photo by Will Taylor.

In Memoriam: Sol Golomb, 83

May 9, 2016

Solomon Golomb, a legendary and longtime electrical engineering and mathematics professor whose pioneering work helped spark the digital communications revolution, has died. He was 83. Golomb, who held joint appointments in…