Skip to main content

Research News

DNA was first identified in the late 1860s by Swiss chemist Friedrich Miescher, but nearly a century would pass before the famous three-dimensional double-helix structure would come to the fore. Fast forward another six decades to the present day, and science has laid bare the human genome in its entirety. Illustrations by Janice Kun.

Molecular You

May 24, 2016

Upbringing and circumstance — and the consequences of a lifetime of decisions — all shape us to varying degrees. And the environment undoubtedly plays some role. But, at the core of it all is our genetics, the…

Chronic pain and subsequent addiction to prescription pain killers are emerging as among the greatest health crises in the United States. Joan Broderick’s research seeks to manage pain through outlets other than medication.

USC Dornsife psychology researcher collaborates on pill-free protocol for treating chronic pain

May 19, 2016

Chronic pain has emerged as one of the most onerous health problems facing Americans — leading to depression, loss of livelihood and, in many cases, addiction to prescription pain killers. According to an investigative…

Subjective well-being refers to a person’s happiness or satisfaction with life. Photo by Richard Walker.

Scientists identify genes connected to well-being, depression and neuroticism

May 18, 2016

An international group of more than 190 scientists who analyzed the genomes of nearly 300,000 individuals have found genetic variants that may influence our sense of well-being, depression and neuroticism. The study is one of…

The two-day USC Global Leadership Summit addressed how European governments should proceed in the wake of Greece’s debt crisis. Photo by Darrin S. Joy.

Global economics experts discuss path to progress after European financial crisis

May 6, 2016

The USC Global Leadership Summit — held April 29-30 at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center on USC’s University Park campus — was a two-day conference featuring leading economic experts discussing the pathway to…

A sign made of a photo composite of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Adolf Hitler looms over protesters gathered in Vienna's main square in March 2014 to protest Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine. Photo by Ben Stevens.

International symposium examines crisis in Central Europe, launches new major

April 12, 2016

The Cold War may be over, but Central Europe, now one of the world’s most strategically important and dynamic regions, today represents a precarious bridge between the West and an increasingly aggressive…

Researchers labeled sensory neurons that are found in the skin. Green indicates protein receptors involved in cold sensation, those involved with pain are in red, and GFRα3, involved in heightening cold sensitization, is marked by blue. Photomicrograph courtesy of David McKemy.

Biology researchers find single gatekeeper guarding path to cold-induced pain

April 8, 2016

Cold can hurt. The onset of inflammation following an injury or as a result of disease can heighten pain response to cold, just as it can for pressure and heat sensitivity. Researchers at USC Dornsife have found that…

Clay Wang and Kasthuri Venkateswaran will launch fungi into space to potentially develop new medicine for use both in space and on Earth. Photo by Gus Ruelas.

USC scientists to send fungi into orbit in quest to develop space meds

April 5, 2016

Researchers at USC and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory say they will be the first team in the world to launch fungi into space for the purpose of potentially developing new medicine for use both in space and on…

A microscopic image shows the type of phytoplankton and bacteria observed by USC researchers during a study of algal blooms. Photo courtesy of David Needham and Jed Fuhrman.

Microorganisms battle it out within algal blooms

March 8, 2016

An unseen war raging among the ocean’s tiniest organisms has significant implications for understanding the ocean’s role in climate change, according to a new study. USC Dornsife researchers David Needham and Jed…

Functional MRI scanners provide maps of signals in the brain, but scientists know these maps may be slightly inaccurate. Photo by Janne Moren.

Rare eye condition gives scientists a chance to improve brain scan studies

March 3, 2016

There is an elephant in the room each time scientists conduct a brain scan study. Functional MRI scans provide colorful maps of signals in the brain, but scientists know these maps may be slightly inaccurate. That’s…

Frontline Scholar: Sophie

Frontline Scholar: Sophie

March 1, 2016

Sophie Wix ’18 knew from an early age that she wanted to be on the cutting edge of cancer research. Working toward that goal, she took advantage of the opportunity to perform research at The Bridge@USC, where she…