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November 2011 Media Mentions

 

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

McClatchy Newspapers mentioned a USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll reporting 64 percent of voters would approve of higher taxes to benefit public schools.

The Fresno Bee mentioned a USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll finding Republican voters ranked Herman Cain second among the GOP presidential hopefuls.

 

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

KPCC-FM reported that the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is teaching survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide how to preserve the history of that event. Stephen Smith, executive director of the institute, said that he would prefer to be documenting testimonies five years before a genocide rather than 50 years after.

Los Angeles Times cited the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that 52 percent of respondents had a favorable opinion of charter schools.

 

November 24-28, 2011

United Press International featured research by Rachel Beattie of psychology and a colleague at The Ohio State University, finding that dyslexia may be partly due to difficulty excluding external noise. A study of 37 students’ ability to sort letters found that the poorest readers were those easily distracted by high background noise.

The Chronicle of Higher Education quoted Laurie Brand, Robert Grandford Wright Professor and professor of international relations, about a report by the Bahrain government on the country’s human rights violations.

The New York Times, in a story by The Bay Citizen, quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Amazon shelving a ballot initiative to overturn a California Internet sales tax law.

Science 2.0 cited Antonio Damasio, director of USC’s Brain and Creativity Institute, regarding the human ego.

The State Column quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Vice President Joe Biden appealing to blue-collar voters.

Los Angeles Times cited the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll finding that 58 percent of California voters want value-added teacher evaluations to be made public. A second Los Angeles Times story cited the poll.

 

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Bloomberg Businessweek ran a Thanksgiving op-ed by Peter Mancall of history and anthropology, and director of the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute, about Thomas Morton, an Anglican Colonist who believed the Pilgrims and local Indians could live peacefully side by side.

The New York Times quoted Nina Eliasoph of sociology about how Occupy Wall Street protestors have steered political debate in the U.S.

NBC News’ “NBC Nightly News” covered the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which surveyed 1,500 registered Californian voters about politics, state education and other topics. NPR also covered the poll.

 

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

The Hill reported on a USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll that found Mitt Romney was the frontrunner in the Republican presidential primaries with 27 percent of respondents favoring him. The National Journal also reported the findings. The Sacramento Bee reported on the poll’s results on education, which found that a majority (64 percent) of Californian voters would be wiling to pay higher taxes to benefit public schools. CW News Los Angeles affiliate KTLA-TV also reported those findings.

The Richmond-Times Dispatch cited a paper by Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity, director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, finding that high numbers of jobless and disconnected minority youth threaten the stability of themselves, their families and society as a whole. The paper recommends an “equity-driven growth model” that ensures race, class and ZIP code don’t pre-determine the health, education and adult income of these youths.

NPR quoted Richard Flory of sociology, director of research at the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, about the rise and fall of the Crystal Cathedral and how living beyond your means played a crucial role in that narrative.

 

November 19-21, 2011

Los Angeles Times featured the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that 64 percent of Californian voters would be willing to higher taxes for public schools, even in a lagging economy. “Voters will pay more ... as long as they are confident the money will be spent in their own communities,” said Dan Schnur, director of the USC Dornsife/LA Times Poll and director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics in USC Dornsife. Fifty-eight percent of respondents want teachers’ performance evaluations made public, Los Angeles Times reported. Los Angeles Times reported that 55 percent of voters oppose the DREAM Act, which permits undocumented students who meet certain requirements to receive taxpayer aid for college; 79 percent of Latinos approve of it, while only 30 percent of whites do. “There are not a lot of other issues on which there are such huge differences,” noted Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity. The poll was also covered by three more Los Angeles Times stories (additional links here and here), Associated Press and BET.

The Huffington Post quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Republican donors “sitting on their wallets” until there is a clear presidential front-runner.

The Desert Sun quoted Jeb Middlebrook of sociology about the driving forces behind a string of brash robberies on Inland Empire freeways.

 

Friday, November 18, 2011

The New York Times ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the infeasibility of requiring a civics test for presidential candidates. Schnur wrote that though it’s reasonable to desire candidates with high intelligence and education, deciding how to measure candidate competence would lead to irresolvable debates. The test’s design would inevitably become politically charged, with both parties trying to influence which questions were added.

Los Angeles Times featured the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that 52 percent of California registered voters have a favorable impression about charter schools, while 12 percent have an unfavorable impression. Forty-eight percent said that charter schools provide a better education, and 24 percent said that traditional schools are better. Los Angeles Times ran a second story featuring the poll.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy reported that the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is expanding its focus to genocides in addition to the Holocaust. The institute has begun collecting testimonies of the genocide in Rwanda and will soon begin adding accounts of Armenian and Cambodian mass killings to its testimony archive.

The Huffington Post ran an op-ed by Nake Kamrany of economics about China’s five-year plan, which focuses on renewable energy and is likely to influence other countries’ approaches to the issue. By increasing investment to $630 billion, the five-year plan ensures a drastic reform domestically, Kamrany wrote. Because China is one of the world’s biggest consumers of fossil fuels, this shift will force nations that provide resources to China to make adjustments as well.

Los Angeles Times quoted Richard Flory of sociology, director of research at the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, about Crystal Cathedral founder Robert Schuller asking his congregation for food donations that would be delivered to his ailing wife via limousine.

Bloomberg Businessweek quoted Richard Flory of sociology, director of research at the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture, about the brand value of the Crystal Cathedral.

 

Thursday, November 17, 2011

The New York Times reported that the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is widening its scope and looking to preserve archival materials on genocides in addition to the Holocaust. The story highlighted a group of Rwandan genocide survivors who are learning preservation methods and lending their own testimonies about the 1994 Rwandan genocide to the institute’s collection. The institute plans to incorporate testimonies of Armenians and Cambodians in the future.

Los Angeles Times featured the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that Mitt Romney is the clear presidential front-runner among Californian Republicans, despite a struggle to rally support from the most conservative voters. Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, said that there have been many conservative alternatives to Romney, but none with any sticking power. Nonpartisan voters heavily favored President Obama over the Republican challengers, and in a hypothetical matchup Obama was favored over Romney 52 percent to 35 percent. The poll also found that Gov. Jerry Brown’s popularity hasn’t suffered as badly as that of other political leaders, Los Angeles Times reported. Forty-six percent of California voters had a favorable impression of Brown, and his approval rate at among Latinos was higher, at 54 percent.

 

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Jewish Journal reported that four members of Rwanda’s Kigali Genocide Memorial Center visited USC to learn how to best document the 1994 Tutsi genocide. The USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is collaborating with the Rwandans in collecting survivor interviews, and providing training on how to preserve and archive them.

The New York Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about how presidential candidate gaffes usually only reflect poorly on the candidates themselves, rather than on their parties.

The Washington Post quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about follow-up questions in political debates.

CBS News interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about how sending the health care law before the Supreme Court was a “high-risk, high-reward gamble” on President Obama’s part.

Fox News Los Angeles affiliate KTTV-TV cited research by Christian Grose of political science and a colleague.

 

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Los Angeles Times covered “Naked Hollywood,” an exhibit at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles curated by Richard Meyer of art history. The exhibit featured the work of photojournalist Arthur “Weegee” Fellig, who took his name from the “Ouija board” after becoming known for showing up at crime scenes before the authorities. When he relocated to L.A., Weegee documented the often-unglamorous side of Hollywood celebrity.

CNN quoted Pamela Starr of international relations about the death and reputation of Mexican Interior Minister Jose Francisco Blake Mora.

Entertainment Weekly quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Michelle Bachman’s complaints that CBS didn’t give her enough airtime during a recent Republican debate, noting CBS may be guilty of “bias in favor of candidates with greater levels of public support.”

The Charlotte Observer quoted David St. John of English about Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Philip Levine, who was recently named the nation’s poet laureate.

Los Angeles Times mentioned that William Deverell of history, and director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West is co-author of “Eden by Design: The 1930 Olmsted-Bartholomew Plan for the Los Angeles Region.”

Scientific American ran a column by Katrina Edwards of biological sciences, earth sciences and environmental studies, and director of USC’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations, who is on an expedition to study microbial life at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

 

November 12-14, 2011

Voice of America reported that four members of Rwanda’s Kigali Genocide Memorial Center visited USC to learn how to best document the 1994 Tutsi genocide. The USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is collaborating with the Rwandans in collecting survivor interviews, and providing training on how to preserve and archive them. Stephen Smith, executive director of the institute, said that this is part of an effort to study the causes and effects of genocide globally.

 

Friday, November 11, 2011

The Globe and Mail (Canada) quoted Leo Brady, University Professor and Leo S. Bing Chair in English and American Literature and Professor of English,  about how regional tastes in film create a need for niche marketing.

Scientific American ran a column by Katrina Edwards of biological sciences, earth sciences and environmental studies, and director of USC’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations, who is on an expedition to study microbial life at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Sacramento Bee mentioned that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, will be interviewed in a KQED-FM report called “Broken California.”

 

Thursday, November 10, 2011

The Huffington Post ran an op-ed co-written by Nake Kamrany of economics about the total cost of the Iraq war to the United States. Kamrany calculated the expected future earnings of the soldiers who have died in Iraq. A deceased soldier’s earnings given an average work-life expectancy came to approximately $10 million, and Kamrany added that there are high implicit costs suffered by the soldiers’ children and other family members.

Bloomberg News quoted Nina Eliasoph of sociology about how Occupy Wall Street has steered political debate in the U.S.

The Huffington Post ran the second installment of a two-part Q&A with Michael Messner of sociology and gender studies about guns in America. Messner spoke about his new book, “King of the Wild Suburb: A Memoir of Fathers, Sons and Guns.”

Salon reported that Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity, director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, attended Equity Summit 11, sharing research showing that the countries and American cities with the least inequality between rich and poor are growing faster than those with the broadest gaps.

Truthout reviewed “Kill the Messenger: The Media’s Role in the Fate of the World” by Maria Armoudian, a doctoral student in political science and international relations.

 

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Jewish Journal reported that the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education is expanding its visual history archive to include testimony about genocides other than the Holocaust, starting with a collection of 50 testimonies by survivors of the 1994 Rawandan genocide. The institute also plans to incorporate materials from the Cambodian and Armenian genocides in the near future.

Politico quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about how poor impressions of the presidential candidates from this point forward could sink their chances at the polls.

The Press of Atlantic City quoted Jane Junn of political science about the voting habits of Asian Americans.

 

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Los Angeles Times quoted Craig Stanford of biological sciences and anthropology about late conservationist and gibbon expert Alan Mootnick, with whom he had traveled on a research trip.

KCET-TV cited research by the USC Center for Sustainable Cities suggesting that deliberate city planning segregated minorities away from park areas, and quoted Travis Longcore of geography about the benefits of open space. The story was produced in collaboration with the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, which are administered by the USC Annenberg School.

The Washington Post, in an Associated Press story, quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, on how Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s anti-immigration views could be both a boon and a burden when it comes to a national general election.

CNN interviewed Steven Ross of history, author of “Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics,” about the global box office benefit of having Latino stars in a film.

Scientific American ran a column by Katrina Edwards of biological sciences, earth sciences and environmental studies, and director of USC’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations, who is on an expedition to study microbial life at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

 

November 5-7, 2011

Los Angeles Times ran a Q&A with Dana Gioia, Judge Widney Professor of Poetry and Public Culture at USC and former chair of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Gioia said that he strove for reconciliation when he presided over the NEA, hoping to help people see why supporting the arts is the right thing to do. He said that at USC, he hopes to teach a class on how young artists can make a living in the United States.

The Washington Post quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about President Obama’s advisers saying that the 2012 election will be a choice between the president and his challenger, rather than a referendum on the administration’s performance.

Los Angeles Times cited Carole Shammas, Professor Emerita and John R. Hubbard Chair Emerita in History, who has documented the fact that from 1776 to the present, the bottom 60 percent of the U.S. population has never held more than 11 percent of the country’s wealth.

The Press of Atlantic City quoted Jane Junn of political science about the voting habits of Asian Americans.

Visalia Times-Delta quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the likelihood that Rep. Devin Nunes will enter the race against Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

Star-Tribune highlighted the upcoming book “Rez Road: An Indian’s Journey Through Reservation Life” by David Treuer of English, who is a winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize and a Minnesota Book Award.

 

Friday, November 4, 2011

Scientific American ran a column by Katrina Edwards of biological sciences, earth sciences and environmental studies, and director of USC’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations, who is on an expedition to study microbial life at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

 

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Jewish Journal ran an op-ed by Gina Nahai of the Master of Professional Writing program about her writing education at USC Dornsife. Nahai wrote that she was a first-year student at the USC Gould School when she met James Ragan, a noted poet who had taken over USC’s Master of Professional Writing program. She added that meeting him led her to challenge the expectations set before her as an Iranian woman.

 

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Jewish Journal reported on a Holocaust education workshop partly sponsored by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and held on the USC campus. The Holocaust Education Institute, designed by the Anti-Defamation League, provides Los Angeles teachers with oral history materials and visits to local institutions so they can better teach the history of the Holocaust to their students. This year, attendees will learn to use iWitness, a new Web-based application for teachers and students that was developed by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute.

Pasadena Star-News reported that Mary Elise Sarotte of international relations will speak at the conference “Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War,” and quoted her about the release of more than 200 declassified CIA documents from the Reagan era.

 

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

MSNBC interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about presidential candidate Herman Cain’s appeal to voters.

The Fresno Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about acrimony between Congressmen Jim Costa and Devin Nunes.

Scientific American ran a column by Katrina Edwards of biological sciences, earth sciences and environmental studies, and  director of USC’s Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations, who is on an expedition to study microbial life at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Sacramento Bee mentioned the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll.