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Campus Grant Program

Grants of up to $350 are available to students, faculty, and staff across the Dornsife College who need funds for activities that coincide with the Levan Institute's mission. Student groups and student-focused projects are given a strong first priority, as are collaborative efforts across departments and schools. Speakers, workshops, student group activities—if you write it up, we'll consider it. Awarded on a rolling basis.

Complete an application.

Past Levan Campus Grants awarded to:

Janis Yue with The Healing Process, grant used to print The Healing Process' third issue for release to USC. The Healing Process is a student-run art and literature magazine that focuses on the intersections between healing and the humanities. The primary purpose of publication is to creatively present student-submitted work in order to promote internal reflection as well as encourage dialogue and thought about the medical profession, the scientific method, and the multi-faceted processes involved in healing.

Alejandro Medina with 100OJOS LATINOS, grant used to create an English version of his website to share with USC Students and Faculty. The website, 100OJOS LATINOS, features Latin American photographers covering social, political, and environmental issues from the region. The English website will be unveiled in Fall 2014.

Juno Zhu, a Resident Assistant at Cardinal 'n' Gold apartments, grant used to create a mobile library for her residents. The library features books about the science of happiness and human behavior. Juno was inspired by USC Dornsife's course, The Science of Happiness.

Kendall Williams, a Graduate of Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and Assistant Director of USC Admissions, grant used to screen Precious Knowledge at USC during EdMonth. The film documents the fight to keep the ethnic studies program within Arizona public schools. Kendall moderated a panel discussion following the screening.

Jackson Burgess with Fractal literary magazine, grant used to print Fractal's third issue for public release. This will be the first edition in print form. Established in 2012, Fractal is a literary magazine founded and edited by students of the University of Southern California. Fractal publishes fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction and operates as a USC student organization.

Francesca Bessy with USC Stand: the anti-genocide coalition, grant used to rent on-campus space for the event "Your Voice, Your World: An Art and Student Speaker Initiative." The event featured performances and speakers on global activism.

Sarah Urke and the Trojan Neurotrama Society, grant used to host a lecture on the professional, social, and ethical considerations related to treating traumatic brain injuries. The event featured Dr. Stuart Swadron, Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine and Assistant Dean for Pre-Health Undergraduate Studies.

Ross Cohen, Willowbrook director, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. In 1964, a young pediatrician begins his residency at Willowbrook State School, only to discover that the institution is conducting Army-funded experiments on developmentally-disabled children. Willowbrook is a short student film based on true events surrounding the school in Staten Island, New York. It explores the controversial and ethically ambiguous research experiments that took place under Dr. Saul Krugman in the 1960s. Using historical research, the film explores themes of conscience and ethics in addition to personal drive, ego and ambition within the world of scientific study. Click here to view the trailer 

Rachel Tobias with TedxTrojans, grant used to print advertising materials for Tedx Event, "Make Your Mark", based on the classic TED Talks, a collection of bright and motivated USC students had the opportunity to present and share their innovative ideas for a brighter future.

Anna Mkhikian with USC Fight On For Darfur, grant used to pay for Derrick Jensen to speak at "Genocide, Why it Happens in a Modernized World", a student run event focusing on questions of genocide, ethics and our role in the world we live.

Rolf Hoefer, Graduate of USC Roski School of Fine Arts, grant used to create the project, "Your Call" a performance art piece aimed at engaging the USC community in questions of personal connections in the digital age and stepping in to help a stranger.

Lee Cerling at the Marshall School of Business, grant used to bring speaker Justin Paperny, USC Alum and now ex-convict to speak to undergraduate students about "Ethics in Motion" - the many ways in which life in the business world can undermine one's moral and ethical bearings.

Catherine Sullivan, USC Philosophy Club and Alpha Epsilon Delta, grant used for a screening of You Don't Know Jack, based on the real life story of Jack Kevorkian and his work in physician-assisted suicide, followed by a discussion on biomedical ethics led by Professor Shlomo Sher.

Ross Cohen, MFA Film Production Candidate, grant used in the creation of the film, Willowbrook. The fictionalized short film is staffed by volunteer USC filmmakers and is based on the true story of controversial research experiments in the 1950s and 1960s at Willobrook State School in Staten Island, New York - eventually leading to the vaccine for Hepatitis B. Willowbrook "explores themes of ethics, personal drive, ego and ambition within a world of scientific discovery".

Tiffany Scalia, Student Activists for a Beloved Community, grant used to screen the film, Bananas! a story of Nicaraguan farmers fighting the fruit company Dole, in the 1970's. The film was used as a kickoff event for the 1st Annual May Day Festival organized by Student Activists for a Beloved Community and other community organizations.

Chelsea-Anne Cymrot, USC Undergraduate, grant used for "Fat Talk Free Week", an "international Tri Delta outreach program that promotes healthy living, positive body image, and aims to decrease negative language associated with eating disorders." 

Benjamin Stillerman, MFA Film Candidate, grant used in the creation of the film, Gray Noise. This film is set at the Santa Monica 3rd Street Promenade and films everyday peoples' reactions to homeless people in the area. It examines the psychological
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harsh
social
conditions
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day‐to‐da