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June 2012 Media Mentions

 

June 30-July 2, 2012

The Washington Post ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the impact of the Supreme Court’s health care decision on the presidential race.

Los Angeles Times quoted Judith “Jack” Halberstam of English, American studies and ethnicity, and gender studies about tough female characters on TV, and noted that she is the author of “Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal.”

National Journal mentioned that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, participated in a poll on whether recent immigration issues would prompt higher Latino voter turnout in November.

Odyssey Magazine featured work that Jill McNitt-Gray of biological sciences and biomedical engineering is doing with Olympic hopefuls to help them improve their athletic performance.

 

Friday, June 29, 2012

India America Today reported that USC will create the first chair of Hindu studies in the United States funded by the Indian-American community. A $3.24 million gift from the Dharma Civilization Foundation will establish the Swami Vivekananda Visiting Faculty in Hindu Studies and the Dharma Civilization Foundation Chair in Hindu Studies in USC Dornsife promoting the study of Indian civilization. Press Trust of India (India) also covered the news.

The Washington Post ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the significance of the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act.

Foreign Affairs ran an op-ed by Pamela Starr of international relations on what the presidential election means for the drug war.

The Guardian (U.K.) quoted Pamela Starr of international relations about Mexican presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto.

New Scientist quoted Yuri Gorby of biological sciences about deep sea bacteria that are capable of passing electrons through one another, which facilitates breathing.

ABC News Los Angeles affiliate KABC-TV interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the Supreme Court’s decision on the Affordable Care Act. City News Service also quoted Schnur.

 

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Los Angeles Times ran a review of “A People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Pulido of American studies and ethnicity and colleagues, a historical guide to cultural struggle and social change in L.A.

Los Angeles Times ran a Q&A with Craig Stanford of biological sciences and anthropology, and co-director of USC’s Jane Goodall Research Center, about the killing of a baby chimpanzee by an adult male chimp at the Los Angeles Zoo. Another Los Angeles Times story quoted Stanford.

 

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Press Trust of India (India) reported that USC will create the first chair of Hindu studies in the United States funded by the Indian-American community. A $3.24 million gift from the Dharma Civilization Foundation will establish the Swami Vivekananda Visiting Faculty in Hindu Studies and the Dharma Civilization Foundation Chair in Hindu Studies in USC Dornsife, promoting the study of Indian civilization. “We are very proud to house the first chair of Hindu studies in the United States endowed by the Indian-American community,” said USC President C. L. Max Nikias. “I believe that this is a watershed moment for the Indian-American community,” said USC Dean of Religious Life Varun Soni, who is the first Hindu to serve as chief religious leader of an American university. “This historic gift to the USC School of Religion highlights the department’s commitment to study the enduring questions of human life and values from a global perspective,” added USC School of Religion Director Duncan Williams.

The Record featured a study by the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration in USC Dornsife and the California Immigrant Policy Center, finding that immigrants boost local economies, stay in one place longer than people realize, and generally have a higher rate of employment than native-born residents. Immigrants earn higher incomes the longer they live in one place. “These are all good signs of moving forward,” said Manuel Pastor, co-director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration.

The Telegraph (U.K.) cited Antonio Damasio, director of USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, regarding a patient of his who suffered impaired emotions as a result of a brain tumor.

KPCC-FM interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about efforts to pass California’s budget.

Merced Sun-Star cited Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, regarding partisanship in Californian politics.

 

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

The Times of India (India) reported that USC will create the first chair of Hindu studies in the United States funded by the Indian-American community. A $3.24 million gift from the Dharma Civilization Foundation will establish the Swami Vivekananda Visiting Faculty in Hindu Studies and the Dharma Civilization Foundation Chair in Hindu Studies in USC Dornsife. The story noted that more than 1,800 Indian students are currently enrolled at USC and that the university boasts three Nobel Prize winners.

Los Angeles Times reported that the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education has finished preserving more than 52,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies, the culmination of an 18-year project. The foundation became part of USC Dornsife in 2006, and turned its attention to conserving testimonies in new ways.

The Huffington Post ran a column by Lois Banner of history and gender studies about Margaret Mead and Marilyn Monroe, describing them as feminist figures with much in common. Banner wrote that both had insatiable curiosity about the world around them, and held views about the role and value of sex that were at odds with their times.

The Washington Post quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, on the Supreme Court’s impending ruling on President Obama’s health care law and what it will mean for the 2012 presidential election.

CBS News interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s appeal as a presidential running mate.

Bloomberg Businessweek quoted Ange-Marie Hancock of political science and gender studies about women as a critical electorate for the Republican Party. ABC News Los Angeles affiliate KABC-TV cited Hancock.

Associated Press quoted Karen Sternheimer of sociology about media depictions of females in movies like “Brave.”

La Opinion quoted Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity about illegal immigrants working in the U.S. and their contributions the economy.

Deccan Chronicle (India) highlighted a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues, finding that ancient Antarctica was once much warmer and wetter than previously thought, and that climate change could return it to those conditions.

 

June 23-25, 2012

The Chronicle of Higher Education highlighted predictions by Judith "Jack" Halberstam of English, American studies and ethnicity, and gender studies that the culture’s changing attitudes toward sex and emotional connections will lead to new, alternative forms of marriage.She predicts that the future will see a rise of different kinship structures like queer families and community parenting.

The Huffington Post ran a column by Nicholas Warner of physics, astronomy and mathematics about an interview he gave to a journalism student. After describing a bleak distant future for both humanity and the universe, the student asked what science could do to help guide people. Warner wrote that though he’s an atheist, he found himself thinking of a friend’s Buddhist philosophies.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the campaign against Proposition 29’s tobacco tax.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch highlighted “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox,” a new biography about Marilyn Monroe by Lois Banner of history and gender studies.

 

Friday, June 22, 2012

Asian News International featured a study by the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration at USC Dornsife and the California Immigrant Policy Center, finding that more than a quarter of the state’s residents are immigrants, and that these immigrants are becoming more settled over time. Roughly 61 percent of immigrants participate in the labor force, the study found, versus 57 percent of non-immigrants. “Their substantial contributions as workers and consumers help fuel the state’s economy and are spread throughout many California regions,” said Manuel Pastor, director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. The research was also covered by KPCC-FM, La Opinion, The Fresno Bee and Los Angeles Daily News.

Ms. reviewed “Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal” by Judith “Jack” Halberstam of English, American studies and ethincity, and gender studies. The book examines shifts in gender and sexuality, many of which are reflected through pop culture and pop-cultural figures like Lady Gaga.

The Globe and Mail (Canada) quoted Patrick James of international relations about an educational initiative sponsored by the Canadian government.

Scientific American highlighted a series of columns written this year about the USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program authored by USC Dornsife students and faculty.

 

Thursday, June 21, 2012

National Geographic featured a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues, finding that ancient Antarctica was once much warmer and wetter than previously thought and that climate change could return it to those conditions. Examining the chemical information in leaf wax, the study’s authors could discern what the climate conditions were like millions of years ago.

 

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Le Monde (France) featured a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues, finding that ancient Antarctica was once much warmer and wetter than previously thought. Press Trust of India (India) reported that, if emissions continue as they have, atmospheric carbon will reach the same level by the end of this century as that in the period studied by Feakins. The story was also covered by China Radio International (China), Europa Press (Spain), ANSA (Italy), Agenzia Giornalistica Italia (Italy), Metro TV (Indonesia) and Sueddeutsche Zeitung (Germany).

Scientific American ran a column by Jim Haw of environmental studies about the school’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

 

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

The New York Times featured data drawn up by Lee Epstein, Provost Professor of Law and Political Science, and a colleague from Washington University in St. Louis, about one-vote majority decisions in orally argued Supreme Court cases. From 1946 through 2010, justices issued one-vote majority opinions on 1,205 out of 7,259 cases. The statistics also revealed that Chief Justice John Roberts beat other chief justices for the greatest share of five-four splits.

United Press International featured a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues, finding that ancient Antarctica was once much warmer and wetter than previously thought and that climate change could return it to those conditions. Examining the chemical information in leaf wax, the study’s authors could discern what the climate conditions were like millions of years ago. Feakins told RadioLive’s “Drive” (New Zealand) that summer temperatures around the study site would have been about 11 degrees warmer than they are today, with shrubs growing along the Antarctic coast. “We knew the Miocene was a warm period, but it was surprising how much vegetation we found evidence for,” Feakins said. The research was also covered by KPCC-FM, Press TV (Iran), Stuff (New Zealand) and La Tercera (Chile).

Scientific American ran a column by David Ginsburg of environmental studies about the school’s scientific diving program.

 

June 16-18, 2012

The Wall Street Journal featured research by Jesse Graham of psychology and a colleague finding that when people are asked to monitor their driving habits, they drive less. For the study, a group of college students kept an online record of the car trips they avoided making. Those students drove less, and when they received feedback on how much money they saved on gas and how much pollution they prevented, they reduced their driving time even more.

Asian News International featured a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues, finding that ancient Antarctica was once much warmer and wetter than previously thought. The climate at the time would have been able to support stunted trees along the continent’s edges. Feakins and colleagues studied ancient plant leaf wax to determine that temperatures on the Antarctic coast 15 million years ago to 20 million years ago were 20 degrees warmer than they are today. “The ultimate goal of the study was to better understand what the future of climate change may look like,” Feakins said. “Just as history has a lot to teach us about the future, so does past climate.” The research was covered by another Asian News International story, Daily Mail (U.K.), International Business Times, Cadena SER (Spain), LiveScience, Science Codex, TG Daily and iTechPost.

 

Friday, June 15, 2012

Truthdig cited Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the need for about California’s new top-two primary system.

The Washington Post quoted Steven Ross of history, author of "Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics," about a celebrity fundraising effort by President Obama.

KPCC-FM’s "Off-Ramp" cited Amy Parish of anthropology and gender studies on what the genetic link between bonobos and humans could mean for evolutionary theory.

Pasadena Star-News reported that Dallas Willard of philosophy be the keynote speaker at The Heart and Soul Conference: Forming Spiritual and Emotional Maturity.

 

Thursday, June 14, 2012

NPR’s “All Things Considered” featured a study by Travis Longcore of spatial sciences, finding that North American communications towers are responsible for an estimated 6.8 million bird deaths each year.

The Economist highlighted research by Richard Easterlin, University Professor and professor of economics, on the reported happiness of urban Chinese citizens between 1990 and 2010. Easterlin found that the population showed no evidence of a marked increase in life satisfaction, despite China’s booming economic prosperity during that period.

Los Angeles Times cited the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, which found that 83 percent of California voters approved of Controller John Chiang docking legislators’ pay during budget disputes last year.

Scientific American ran a column by USC Dornsife students Mallory Pirogovsky and Abigail Joyce about scientific research diving at USC Dornsife.

 

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The Wall Street Journal highlighted a study by Travis Longcore of spatial sciences, finding that North American communications towers are responsible for an estimated 6.8 million bird deaths each year. Longcore’s study recommended that the steady red lights used to guide pilots away from towers be changed to flashing lights, which seem to distract birds less. Last month, the Federal Aviation Association determined it would be safe to switch the lights.

United Press International featured research by Daniel Lidar of electrical engineering systems, chemistry, and physics and astronomy, Paolo Zanardi of physics and Silvano Garnerone, formerly a USC postdoctoral researcher, on how quantum computers can improve Internet search algorithms. The research was also covered by TG Daily, The Register (U.K.), MIR 24 (Russia), Ars Technica and ScienceDaily.

Scientific American ran a column about Karl Huggins, director of the Catalina Hyperbaric Chamber located at the USC Wrigley Marine Science Center. Huggins has made many major contributions to diving, including a set of decompression dive tables and a decompression algorithm used in EDGE, an electronic diving computer. The column was written by USC Dornsife students Kaitlin Mogentale and Nicole Matthews.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the effects of the Los Angeles County Unified School District’s shortened school year.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Los Angeles County Assessor John Noguez taking a paid leave of absence while under investigation.

NBC News Los Angeles affiliate KNBC-TV interviewed Thomas Ward of anthropology about a spike in gang crimes in Anaheim. O.C. Weekly also quoted Ward.

Ventura County Star quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, on how California’s top-two primary system incentivizes politicians to move toward the center. The Record Searchlight also cited Schnur.

The Sacramento Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Gov. Jerry Brown’s approach to welfare reform.

The Bay Citizen quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the revelation that solar panel maker Solyndra shed nearly 1,900 jobs when it closed, more than previously reported.

The Huffington Post highlighted the “Easterlin paradox,” named after Richard Easterlin, University Professor and professor of economics, which indicates that happiness doesn’t continually increase along with a country’s average income.

 

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Estadao (Brazil) ran a Q&A with Rebecca Lemon of English, who recently gave a lecture on Shakespeare at a Brazilian law school. She spoke about the enduring power of Shakespeare’s work, and how legal scholars can find something to relate to in the Bard’s work. Lemon said that Shakespeare touched everyone in the room, with the discussion ranging from revenge and tyranny to love, faith and religion.

Los Angeles Times quoted Stanley Rosen of political science about Hollywood studios catering to China’s censorship board in order to avoid offending Chinese financial backers.

Scientific American ran a column by student Kaitlin Mogentale about USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

 

June 9-11, 2012

The Jerusalem Post (Israel) highlighted “Looking for Spinoza” by Antonio Damasio, director of USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, on 17th century Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza’s anticipation of modern science’s discoveries regarding human emotions. The story compared Damasio’s research on victims with severe head trauma to research by neurologist Simon Baron-Cohen, who studies the scientific causes of evil.

San Francisco Chronicle quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about political campaign spending on social media.

Bloomberg News quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about President Obama’s comment that the private sector economy is “doing fine.”

Toronto Star (Canada) mentioned a lecture by Antonio Damasio, director of USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, titled “Music and the Brain.”

Scientific American ran a column by student Judith Fong about the USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

 

Friday, June 8, 2012

Los Angeles Times featured an educational site developed with USC grant money and run by Kim Thomas-Barrios, executive director of the USC Neighborhood Academic Initiative, and novelist Jervey Tervalon. The site, Literature for Life, connects L.A. authors and artists with teachers to inspire urban students. Participating authors include Aimee Bender of English and Los Angeles Times food writer Jonathan Gold. The site targets roughly a dozen schools in the USC neighborhood, though its material is available to anyone for free.

La Jornada (Mexico) featured Re-mix, a meeting of museum representatives organized and supported in part by the USC Fisher Museum of Art, home of USC’s International Museum Institute. The meeting’s goal is to explore the roles of regional and national museums in the Americas. Selma Holo of art history, director of both the institute and the Fisher Museum, said that the meeting brings large-museum directors together with those at smaller museums, increasing collaboration and communication. She added that participants hope to shake up the system, because in the museum field the power to shape the conversation is held in too few hands.

NPR’s “Talk of the Nation” interviewed David Treuer of English about Native American identity. Indian Country Today highlighted the interview.

Gannett News Service quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about California’s Latino primary candidates.

Fox & Hounds Daily cited the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll finding that California voters would oppose a high-speed rail plan if given another chance to vote on it.

Scientific American ran a column by student Inaki Pedroarena-Leal about USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

Politico mentioned that actress and USC Dornsife student America Ferrera is working to encourage young Latinos to register and vote.

 

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Los Angeles Times ran an op-ed by Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about California’s new redistricting procedures and top-two primary system. Both changes will force incumbents to compete more for votes, Schnur wrote. The primary system allows two candidates from the same party to compete in a runoff — but even this is a win for voters, he added. “This is likely to push candidates to the middle because candidates will be trying to attract general election voters from the other party as well as from their own,” Schnur wrote. KPCC-FM highlighted the op-ed.

The Nordic Page (Norway) featured Manuel Castells, University Professor, Wallis Annenberg Chair of Communication Techonology and Society and professor of communication, sociology, planning, and international relations, who received the 2012 Holberg International Memorial Prize. The award, bestowed by a Norwegian foundation, recognizes research in the arts and humanities, social sciences, law and theology. “Manuel Castells is the leading sociologist of the city and new information and media technologies,” wrote the Holberg Prize Academic Committee.

The New York Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about California’s new open primary system. The Wall Street Journal and Reuters also quoted Schnur.

Los Angeles Times quoted Paul Alkon, professor emeritus of English, about the late Ray Bradbury’s strengths as a writer.

Los Angeles Times noted that the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll found California voters prefer President Obama to Mitt Romney 56 percent to 37 percent.

Scientific American ran a column by student Dylan Giordano about USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

 

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about increased political competition in California’s newly drawn districts.

Associated Press quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Proposition 28, involving legislator term limits. The Sacramento Bee and San Jose Mercury News also quoted Schnur.

NBC News Los Angeles affiliate KNBC-TV interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll and local political issues.

The Press-Enterprise quoted Andrei Simic of anthropology about how major metropolitan cities like New York and Chicago have long been first stops for European immigrants.

Los Angeles Times mentioned that the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll found President Obama leading Mitt Romney among California voters 56 percent to 37 percent. The poll was also covered by National Journal.

Scientific American ran a column by student Roxana Aslan about USC Dornsife’s Guam and Palau Maymester program.

 

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Los Angeles Times featured the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll finding that a majority of Californians would vote against a proposed high-speed rail project if they had the chance to vote on it again. Associated Press reported that since the project’s approval, its estimated cost has nearly doubled. The poll was also covered by Politico, The Washington Examiner, The Orange County Register, Talking Points Memo, L.A. Weekly, Sacramento Business Journal and Contra Costa Times.

KQED-FM’s “Mind/Shift” featured research by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at the Brain and Creativity Institute, and colleagues, on the benefits students get from daydreaming. The study found that daydreaming allows people to make sense of their experiences; not doing this can keep students from “considering the abstract, longer-term, moral and emotional implications of their and others’ actions,” Immordino-Yang and colleagues wrote.

CBS News interviewed Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the California primary election.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” interviewed John Allen, researcher in the Brain and Creativity Institute, about his new book, “The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship with Food.” Allen wrote about crispy foods and why they appeal to people in so many cultures.

 

June 2-4, 2012

Los Angeles Times featured the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll, in which 59 percent of voters said they would vote against the 2008 bond measure funding a high-speed rail project in California. Sixty-nine percent of Californians said they would never or hardly ever use the service. The poll was also covered by Bloomberg News, ABC News Los Angeles affiliate KABC-TV, KPCC-FM, The Orange County Register and Los Angeles Daily News.

The Fresno Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the potentially historic nature of tomorrow’s Californian primary.

California Watch quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about voter support for Proposition 28, which involves legislative term limits.

The Huffington Post highlighted a report by Manuel Pastor of American studies and ethnicity and a colleague on the aftermath of the civil unrest in Los Angeles in 1992.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch highlighted “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox,” a new Marilyn Monroe biography written by Lois Banner of history and gender studies.

The Sacramento Bee ran highlights from a live chat with Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, and Jon Fleischman of the Flash Report blog about Proposition 28, which would change legislative term limits.