Past Events

  • Living New Deal

    LIVING NEW DEAL

    The Living New Deal is a collaborative project to document, map and make public the legacy of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, which put people back to work during the Great Depression creating infrastructure, including schools, parks, public buildings, and artworks. Please join us for a presentation by New Deal experts Gray Brechin and Harvey Smith as they explore the legacy of the New Deal in Los Angeles and Southern California. Harvey and Gray demonstrate how to use the Living New Deal website, map and archive as a resource, as well as share details on how you can contribute to this monumental effort.

    ICW is pleased to sponsor this presentation about the New Deal’s continuing cultural and built-environment resonances in Southern California.

    May 28, 2014

  • ICW In Conversation

    MIRIAM PAWEL, author of The Crusades of Cesar Chavez, A Biography

    In the first comprehensive biography of Chavez, Miriam Pawel offers a searching yet empathetic portrayal. Chavez emerges here as a visionary figure with tragic flaws; a brilliant strategist who sometimes stumbled; and a canny, streetwise organizer whose pragmatism was often a odds with his elusive, soaring dreams. He was an experimental thinker with eclectic passions—an avid, self-educated historian and a disciple of Gandhian non-violent protest. Drawing on thousands of documents and scores of interviews, this superbly written life deepens our understanding of one of Chavez’s most salient qualities: his profound humanity.

    May 21, 2014

  • ICW in Conversation

    THOMAS ANDREWSUniversity of Colorado, Boulder

    The Environmental History of the Rockies

    Professor Andrews discusses his work on the environmental history of the Colorado Rockies as it relates to his published and work-in-progress scholarship.

    April 24, 2014

    Graduate Student Discussion

    An information discussion about pursuing graduate work in western American and environmental history, grant-seeking, and publication strategies for your work.

     

  • Call for Applications

    The Ninth Annual Western History Dissertation Workshop for Advanced Ph.D. Candidates, Saturday, May 31, at the University of Washington.

    application deadline: March 1

  • ICW In Conversation series

    BRENDA MARSHALL, author of Dakota, Or What's A Heaven For.

    Brenda Marshall was born on a farm in the Red River Valley of eastern North Dakota, and grew up climbing trees, riding her pony, and daydreaming under the wide prairie sky. She left North Dakota after college, and has since lived in Colorado, Minnesota, Iowa, Washington, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and for the past seventeen years, Michigan.  She holds a Ph.D. in English and teaches part-time in the English Department at the University of Michigan.

    April 15, 2014

  • Clark Davis Memorial Lecture

    BEYOND RED AND BLUE: SUBURBAN LIBERALS, HIGH-TECH INDUSTRY, AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY

    Lily Geismer, Claremont McKenna

    April 4, 2014

  • L.A. History and Metro Studies Group

    dual paper session:

    THE CAPITALIST GAMES: PRIVATIZATION, PROTEST, AND THE 1984 LOS ANGELES OLYMPICS

    Caitlin Parker, UCLA

    THE SCORE ON THE KILLING GROUND: LAW AND ORDER, THE MILITARIZATION OF THE LAPD, AND THE PUNITIVE SIDE OF URBAN LIBERALISM IN LOS ANGELES, 1965-1975

    Max Felker-Kantor, USC; guest moderator Susan Phillips, Scripps College 

    February 28, 2014

  • "Writing from California"

    TALES FROM TWO CITIES

    PART 2: LOS ANGELES

    Two free conferences examining the literature of Alta, California, north and south — from immigration to innovation, from the desert to the coast. Poetry, fiction, non-fiction, print and digital: It’s all part of how California defines itself, going back to the earliest days. Regional distinctions are important, but most essential is the idea of California as a state with a culture and aesthetic all its own. What is our sensibility? How does the literature of California tell us who we are?

    February 21-22, 2014

  • ICW In Conversation series:

    DEANNE STILLMAN

    In Desert Reckoning, Deanne Stillman continues her long-time desert beat and uses Kueck’s story as a point of departure to further explore our relationship to place and the wars that are playing out on our homeland. In addition, Stillman also delves into the hidden geologic, Native American, and cultural history of Los Angeles County, and traces the paths of two men on a collision course that could only end in the modern Wild West. 

    February 11, 2014

  • TreePeople:

    THE TYRANNY OF TURF: LOS ANGELES LANDSCAPES AFTER THE AQUEDUCT

    Bill Deverell (USC), Chris Sellers (SUNY Stony Brook), Doug Sackman (University of Puget Sound), Paula Schiffman (CSUN)

    November 17, 2013

  • ICW conference:

    MIXED-RACE FAMILIES IN THE WEST: WHAT IS LOST AND WHAT IS GAINED?

    An inter-disciplinary workshop exploring issues of mixed-race and multi-ethnic identity in the American West.  Drawing from the region’s historic diversity, the workshop will consider the role that California and the West plays in shaping the nation’s understandings of mixed-race families and individuals, and how the growing mixed-race population is shaping education, politics, public policy and the media. 

    Panelists: Robert Chao Romero (UCLA), Duncan Williams (USC), Marcia Dawkins (USC), Fernando de Necochea (SCE), Kurt Streeter (LA Times), Michelle Chihara (Whittier College), Jessica Kim (CSUN), Wonil Kim (La Sierra University), Keith Woodhouse (Northwestern)

    November 16, 2013

  • ICW and USC's American Studies and Ethnicity Department present:

    CAN SETTLER COLONIAL STUDIES CONTRIBUTE TO A REAPPRAISAL OF THE MORMON SETTLEMENT OF A GREAT BASIN KINGDOM?

    Lorenzo Veracini (Swinburne Institute for Social Research, Melbourne, Australia)

    November 13, 2013

  • ICW In Conversation series:

    ANDREW ISENBERG

    Andrew Isenberg is Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia.  He is the author of The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920 (Cambridge University Press, 2000); Mining California: An Ecological History (Hill and Wang, 2005), and, most recently, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life (Hill and Wang 2013).

    November 12, 2013

  • L.A. History and Metro Studies Group:

    "THE DOLLAR IN A DARK HAND:" WHY CALIFORNIA LED THE LEGAL STRUGGLE AGAINST RACIAL COVENANTS AND FOR OPEN HOUSING

    Greg Hise, University of Nevada Las Vegas

    January 14, 2014


    dual paper session:

    PAINTING A MODERN JEWISH HISTORY: THE WARNER MURALS IN THE WILSHIRE BOULEVARD TEMPLE

    MacKenzie Stevens, USC

    CULTIVATING THE CALIFORNIA DREAM: THE 1930s CITRUS INDUSTRY AND THE SUNKIST BUILDING MURAL COMMISSION

    Monica Jovanovich-Kelley, UC San Diego

    November 8, 2013


     

    FOOD AND THE DIVERSE METROPOLIS

    roundtable session:

    Rose Hayden-Smith (Strategic Initiative Leader, Sustainable Food Systems, California Master Gardener Program, UC Cooperative Extension), Rachel Surls (County Director, UC Cooperative Extension), Nat Zappia (Whittier College), Hal S. Barron (Harvey Mudd College)

    October 1, 2013


  • "Writing from California"

    TALES FROM TWO CITIES

    Two free conferences examining the literature of Alta, California, north and south — from immigration to innovation, from the desert to the coast. Poetry, fiction, non-fiction, print and digital: It’s all part of how California defines itself, going back to the earliest days. Regional distinctions are important, but most essential is the idea of California as a state with a culture and aesthetic all its own. What is our sensibility? How does the literature of California tell us who we are?

    PART 1: SAN FRANCISCO

    October 4-5, 2013

    "Conference will examine state's literary identity"

    by Evan Karp, SFGate

  • Natural History Museum Summer Movie Series

    CHINATOWN on our big outdoor wall

    Co-presented by NHM and the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West. Made possible with support from Metabolic Studio.

    The 100th anniversary of the Los Angeles Aqueduct and NHM is marked with a special outdoor screening of Chinatown, the classic 1974 neo-noir film about the rise of Los Angeles by way of the importation of water starring John Huston, Jack Nicholson, and Faye Dunaway.

    September 27, 2013
  • IN CONVERSATION Series

    PETER WESTWICK AND PETER NEUSHUL

    Despite, its rebellious, outlaw reputation, or perhaps because of it, surfing occupies a central place in the American – and global – imagination, embodying the tension between subversive romantic counterculture and mainstream middle-class values, between an individualistic communion with nature and a growing commitment to commerce and technology. The World in the Curl offers a fresh angle on the remarkable rise of the sport and its influence on modern life, by highlighting the forces that fueled the sport's expansion: colonialism, tourism, the military-industrial complex, globalization, capitalism, environmental engineering, and race and gender roles. 

    July 25, 2013
  • ICW and ALOUD of the Library Foundation of Los Angeles

    CATASTROPHE IN CALIFORNIA: A REAPPRAISAL OF THE ST. FRANCIS DAM COLLAPSE

    In March of 1928, the St. Francis Dam north of Los Angeles—designed by William Mulholland as a reservoir for the California Aqueduct—collapsed. The largest engineering disaster in California history is inextricably woven into the epic history of water in Los Angeles. In this centennial year of the California Aqueduct, join us for a discussion of the St. Francis tragedy and its enduring catastrophic and cultural significance.

    With author Rebecca Solnit and historians William Deverell and Donald Jackson; moderated by Patt Morrison, Los Angeles Times columnist & radio host
    July 23, 2013
  • ICW Panel on Southern California Edison Photographic Archive

    LABORATORY FOR MODERNITY

    Scholars and urban planners participate in a discussion focused on landscape and infrastructural changes in greater Los Angeles, ca. 1940-1990.  The evening's panel event draws on a new online photographic exhibit drawn from the Southern California Edison photographic archive at the Huntington Library.  That archive, with more than 70,000 images, offers a fascinating tour of the Los Angeles past and insight into how Los Angeles became modern.  Panelists and discussants include Greg Hise, William Deverell, Sarah Schrank, Jan Reiff, Eric Avila, and Alan Loomis.  

    July 11, 2013
  • IN CONVERSATION Series

    THE GREAT OCEAN: PACIFIC WORLDS FROM CAPTAIN COOK TO THE GOLD RUSH

    The Pacific of the early eighteenth century was not a single ocean but a vast and varied waterscape, a place of baffling complexity, with 25,000 islands and seemingly endless continental shorelines. But with the voyages of Captain James Cook, global attention turned to the Pacific, and European and American dreams of scientific exploration, trade, and empire grew dramatically. By the time of the California gold rush, the Pacific's many shores were fully integrated into world markets-and world consciousness.  The Great Ocean draws on hundreds of documented voyages--some painstakingly recorded by participants, some only known by archeological remains or indigenous memory--as a window into the commercial, cultural, and ecological upheavals following Cook's exploits.

    David Igler, UCI

    April 24, 2013
  • Trent Dames Lecture in the History of Civil Engineering

    PAVING THE PAST: THE LOS ANGELES RIVER AS FLOOD CONTROL DEVICE

    As Los Angeles grew to metropolitan maturity with the arrival of the 20th century, one landscape feature became increasingly tagged as a problem, even a menace.

    The tiny and generally unreliable Los Angeles River proved, as winter rains caused it to leap its banks and fill much of the basin with floodwater, to be a tempestuous and even dangerous obstacle to regional growth. Enter, by way of innovations in engineering and hydrology, the long-range plan to pave the river into submission. This lecture explores that history and, along the way, investigates the ways in which large-scale environmental projects such as cementing a river can inevitably reveal much about regional culture and identity.

    William Deverell, USC

    April 22, 2013
  • Pacific Standard Time

    INEXPLICABLE LOS ANGELES: GHOSTS AND TRACES, 1940-1990

    This panel discussion with distinguished thinkers and writers about Los Angeles ponders the astonishing Southern California Edison archive of 70,000 images devoted to the expansion of electrification in the Los Angeles basin.  This event showcases the online exhibition about landscape and form in Los Angeles, which is part of The Getty's initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents, an exploration of the rise of modern architecture in Los Angeles, 1940-1990. 

    The discussion and slide show feature images and narratives drawn from the Edison archive at The Huntington Library.  Panelists include writer D.J. Waldie, USC University Professor Leo Braudy, USC history professors Bill Deverell and Philip Ethington, independent curator Claudia Bohn Spector, and filmmaker Josh Oreck.

    April 15, 2013
  • ICW and The Huntington Library: Getty Edison Exhibit Launch and Blog

    "BETTER LIVING THROUGH ELECTRICITY:" LOS ANGELES, 1940-1990 

    Join us for an evening’s discussion and presentation of images about architecture, culture, and electricity in modern Los Angeles.  Panelists include project organizers Greg Hise and William Deverell, exhibit curators Jessica Kim and Peter Westwick, project designer Kris Mun, photographer Robbert Flick, and Los Angeles Times architectural critic Christopher Hawthorne. 

    April 1, 2013

    VERSO LECTURE BLOG

  • USC History Department and ICW

    WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT ENERGY: HISTORY, CULTURE, AND ENERGY IN THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY UNITED STATES 

    A panel featuring presentations by three scholars:

    Chris Jones (University of California-Berkeley) - “Landscapes of Intensification: Infrastructure and Energy Demand”

    Darren Dochuk (Washington University) - “There Will Be Oil: A Religious History of Pipeline Politics”

    Jim Feldman (University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh) - “Permanence, Justice, and Nuclear Waste”

    The history of energy generation and use in the United States is not only technical and geographic; it is cultural and political. This panel will examine the relationship between people and different energy regimes by discussing the Holtwood hydroelectric dam on the Susquehanna River and how infrastructure shaped patterns of use and personal behavior; the history of oil patch religion, evangelical Protestantism, and wildcat entrepreneurialism; and the ongoing search for a nuclear waste repository at the intersection of national policy, local interests, and long-term sustainability.

    March 12, 2013
  • USC History Department and ICW

    THE BATTLE FOR THE AMERICAN MIND: THE CULTURE WARS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Andrew Hartman, Illinois State University

    Whether the culture wars in higher education during the 1980s and 1990s had political consequences is debatable. But that they had enduring historical significance is inarguable. Shouting matches about academia reverberated beyond the ivory tower to lay bare a crisis of national faith, demonstrating that the culture wars did not boil down to any one specific issue or even a set of issues. Rather, the culture wars often hinged on a more epistemological question about national identity: How should Americans think? 

    February 25, 2013
  • Keith Woodhouse featured in video

    KEITH WOODHOUSE

    Keith is one of the USC Dornsife postdocs featured in this video representing a variety of disciplines that span the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences and behavioral sciences.

  • ICW In Conversation series

    JON WIENER

    In HOW WE FORGOT THE COLD WAR: A HISTORICAL JOURNEY ACROSS AMERICAJon Wiener criss-crosses the U.S., visiting almost two dozen Cold War museums, monuments, and historical sites.  What he finds is remarkable: Despite the 1991 appropriation of $10 million to create a program that would help future generations appreciate the significance of the Cold War, the monuments weren’t built, the historic sites have few visitors, and many of the museums have shifted focus to other topics.  The problem: the public has not embraced the conservatives’ view that “Ronald Reagan won the Cold War.”  Instead, public response to that message has ranged from apathy, to skepticism, to resistance. 

    Jon Wiener is professor of history at UC Irvine and a contributing editor of The Nation magazine.

    November 30, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    FREDERICK HOXIE

    While American Indian political activists have long been dismissed as “assimilated” people cut off from the mainstream of tribal life, this new monograph demonstrates that Indian political activism is older than the United States and that the activists’ political agenda emerged from the struggles of dozens of individuals working in a variety of cultural settings. Frederick Hoxie’s newest book, THIS INDIAN COUNTRY, demonstrates that Native activists were the principal authors of the ideas opened a space for Native people, both in the law and in American society. Hoxie is Swanlund Professor of History, Law and American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign.

    November 5, 2012
  • ICW L.A. History & Metro Studies Group
    2012-2013 Meeting Schedule

    ALL ROADS LEAD TO EAST L.A.: FREEWAYS AND THE FREEWAY REVOLT IN LOS ANGELES

    Eric Avila, UCLA

    April 12, 2013

    ZONING PRIVACY: REGULATING ADULT ENTERTAINMENT IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CA, 1965-1980

    Clayton Howard, College of the Holy Cross

    HOUSING THE LIBERATION: THE FIGHT FOR EQUITABLE HOUSING AND THE POLITICS OF GAY ACTIVISM IN METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES, 1960-1984

    Ian Baldwin, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    March 15, 2013

    RELIGION AND METROPOLITAN HISTORY

    Roundtable discussion: Samuel Chu, Brie Loskota, Richard Flory, Eileen Luhr, Mark Wild

    February 22, 2013

    PILGRIMS' METROPOLIS: POSTWAR MIGRATIONS AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RELIGIOUS MARKETPLACE

    Eileen Luhr, CSU Long Beach

    January 22, 2013

    L.A. JEWS AND THE QUESTION OF RACE - a dual-paper seminar

    AMERICAN JEWISH DIVERSITY: CONVERSION, RACE, AND CULTURAL CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY L.A.

    Genevieve Okada, UC San Diego

    NOT QUITE WHITE: RESIDENTIAL PATTERNS OF LOS ANGELES JEWS, 1920-2000

    Bruce Phillips, Hebrew Union College

    December 7, 2012

    METROPOLITAN HISTORY: WHAT IS IT AND WHERE IS IT GOING?

    Roundtable discussion: Lauren Hirschberg (UCLA), David Levitus (USC), Janice Reiff (UCLA), Andrew Wiese (SDSU)

    October 12, 2012
  • PAST TENSE at the Huntington Library
    2012-2013 Seminar Schedule

    WRITING THE STAGECOACH NATION: THINKING THROUGH LOCALITY, COMMUNICATION AND THE HISTORICAL NOVEL IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITAIN

    Ruth Livesey (University of London and Huntington Short-Term Fellow)

    April 19, 2013

     

    "THE INTERNAL ENEMY:" NARRATING SLAVERY IN POST-REVOLUTIONARY VIRGINIA

    Alan Taylor (UC Davis and Huntington Long-Term Fellow)

    March 8, 2013

    UNDERSTANDING INNER LIVES FROM LINCOLN TO JOHN LENNON

    Joshua Wolf Shenk (author and Huntington Long-Term Fellow)

    February 1, 2013

    STOP SAVING THE PLANET, ALREADY!: RACHEL CARSON, HISTORY, AND THE FUTURE OF ENVIRONMENTALISM

    Jenny Price (independent scholar and L.A. Urban Ranger)

    December 14, 2012

    REDUCING THE SCALE OF HISTORICAL OBSERVATION: MICRO-HISTORY, ALLTAGSGESCHICHTE, LOCAL HISTORY

    Steve Hindle (W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research, Huntington Library)

    October 19, 2012

    THE ART OF THE PROFILE: TELLING CHINA'S STORY, ONE LIFE AT A TIME

    Jeff Wasserstrom (UC Irvine and Chinese Characters co-editor)Angilee Shah (journalist and Chinese Characters co-editor)James Carter (St. Joseph’s University and Chinese Characters contributor)

    September 28, 2012
  • ICW Workshop and Discussion

    THINGS I'D LIKE TO KNOW ABOUT LOS ANGELES

    Drawn in part from A Companion to Los Angeles, edited by William Deverell and Greg Hise (Blackwell-Wiley, 2010)

    Participants include: Stephen Aron, Eric Avila, Peter Coveney, William Deverell, John Mack Faragher, Anthea Hartig, Christopher Hawthorne, Steve Hindle, Greg Hise, Josh Kun, Ruben Martinez, Jim Newton, Michelle Nickerson, Angela Oh, Manuel Pastor, Jane Pisano, George Sanchez, Josh Sides, Raphael Sonenshein, Susan Straight, Dell Upton

    VERSO LECTURE BLOG

    September 8, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    MICHELLE NICKERSON

    Michelle Nickerson is Assistant Professor of History at Loyola University, Chicago where she teaches U.S. women’s, gender, and urban history.  Nickerson recently published MOTHERS OF CONSERVATISM: WOMEN AND THE POSTWAR RIGHT, which documents the grassroots activism of conservative women in Cold War Los Angeles and explores the impact of that activism on the emerging American right.  This work has led to her interest in regional and metropolitan political-economic development, which she examines in a volume essays, co-edited with historian Darren Dochuk called SUNBELT RISING: THE POLITICS OF PLACE, SPACE, AND REGION published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2011.

    September 7, 2012
  • THE ELEMENTAL WEST: REFLECTIONS ON MOVING WATER

    Kathleen Dean Moore and Dean Childs

    June 6, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    SAM WATTERS

    When Progressives took on the elevation of American culture and taste after the perceived vulgarities of the Gilded Age, women participated through the beautification of house and garden. In 1913, wives of the period’s one percenters corralled family and friends to found and fund the national Garden Club of America. Determined to promote by example horticultural standards and professional landscape design, members commissioned photo-journalist Frances Benjamin Johnston to document for publication and illustrated lectures gardening successes East and West.

    July 27, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    WADE GRAHAM

    Wade Graham explores what four hundred years of garden making in America reveal about our values, politics, and dreams, and how our evolving relationship with Nature in our gardens forms a unique window onto the continuing process of fashioning a national identity in his newly-published book, AMERICAN EDEN: FROM MONTICELLO TO CENTRAL PARK TO OUR BACKYARDS, WHAT OUR GARDENS TELL US ABOUT WHO WE ARE (HarperCollins 2011). This social history of gardens in America is an expansive and penetrating exploration of how our evolving relationships with our gardens and landscapes have reflected our national identity over the course of time.

    June 14, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    MIROSLAVA CHAVEZ-GARCIA

    Miroslava Chávez-García is Chair and associate professor in the Chicana/o Studies Department at the University of California at Davis. She received her doctorate in History from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1998 and is the author of NEGOTIATING CONQUEST: GENDER AND POWER IN CALIFORNIA, 1770s to 1880s (University of Arizona Press, 2004) as well as articles on gender, patriarchy, and the law in nineteenth century California.

    Her most recent book, STATES OF DELINQUENCY: RACE AND SCIENCE IN THE MAKING OF CALIFORNIA'S JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (University of California Press, 2012) uses one of the harshest states—California—as a case study for examining racism in the treatment of incarcerated young people of color. Using rich new untapped archives, Delinquency is the first book to explore the experiences of young Mexican Americans, African Americans, and ethnic Euro-Americans in California correctional facilities including Whittier State School for Boys and the Preston School of Industry.

    June 1, 2012
  • ICW and USC Visions and Voices

    THIS GREAT AND CROWDED CITY: WOODY GUTHRIE'S LOS ANGELES

    In conjunction with the Visions and Voices program at USC and the GRAMMY Museum of Los Angeles, ICW is proud to present a major conference honoring the life, legacy, and centenary of Woodrow Wilson “Woody” Guthrie.

    The conference took place on April 14th, 2012, at Bovard Auditorium on the USC campus.  Speakers and musicians will highlight Guthrie’s music and rise to fame in Depression-era Los Angeles.  Individual presentations discuss such topics as Guthrie’s influences, the power of radio in 1930s Los Angeles, Guthrie’s ties to John Steinbeck and the Joads, as well as the contemporary resonance of Guthrie in folk music and folk migration across borders and boundaries in North America.  

    The pinnacle of the Los Angeles celebration took place on Saturday evening, April 14, with the second installment of This Land Is Your Land ~ The Woody Guthrie Centennial Celebration Concert at Club Nokia at L.A. LIVE in downtown Los Angeles.  Performing classic Guthrie songs will be Jackson Browne, David Crosby & Graham Nash, Dawes, John Doe, Richie Furay, Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion, Kris Kristofferson, Tom Morello, Joel Rafael, Rob Wasserman and More.

    VERSO LECTURE BLOG

    April 14, 2012
  • ICW In Conversation series

    KEITH WOODHOUSE

    Keith Woodhouse is a postdoctoral fellow with the University of Southern California and the Huntington Library Institute on California and the West. He has taught at several campuses in the University of Wisconsin system, as well as at U.S.C. His research focuses on the politics, ethics, and philosophy of radical environmentalism in the late-twentieth-century United States. In his conversation with Bill Deverell, he will discuss the debate over "ecoterrorism" from the 1980s to the present.

    April 19, 2012
  • RAILROADED: A CONVERSATION WITH RICHARD WHITE AND BILL DEVERELL

    To mark the publication of historian Richard White’s new book (W.W. Norton, 2011), the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West hosted a workshop featuring commentary from four distinguished scholars and a response from the author. Participants include: Daniel Carpenter, Naomi Lamoreaux, Eric Rauchway, Steve Usselman, and Richard White.

    March 1, 2012
  • ICW and the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies

    SUNBELT RISING: THE CALIFORNIA ORIGINS OF THE MODERN EVANGELICAL RIGHT

    Darren Dochuk, Purdue University

    Darren Dochuk—author of FROM BIBLE BELT TO SUNBELT: PLAIN-FOLK RELIGION, GRASSROOTS POLITICS, AND THE RISE OF EVANGELICAL CONSERVATISM—will highlight some of the key (and until now, relatively hidden) political dimensions of evangelical conservatism as they emerged in Southern California in the decades following World War II. Connecting current events to deep-rooted historical trends, Dochuk will discuss Southern California evangelicalism's ongoing influence on our politics as well as some of the innovative and fascinating ways that scholars, journalists and students can uncover this component of American culture in its fullest dimensions.

    March 1, 2012
  • HEH Billington Lecture

    A HOLE IN THE DREAM: THE GHOST DANCE AND THE CRISIS OF GILDED AGE AMERICA

    The tragic climax of the Ghost Dance at Wounded Knee, South Dakota in 1890 has come to symbolize the end of the frontier, but it was more than that.  According to Louis Warren, professor of history at UC Davis, the visions that gave birth to the movement and the complicated American response to its signaled the start of the twentieth century and its pervasive anxieties about environmental decay and racial animosity.

    November 8, 2011

    details

  • Past Tense at The Huntington: 2011-12 seminar series

    PAST TENSE WORKSHOP: CREATIVELY WRITING A HUNTINGTON OBJECT

    April 27, 2012

    details


    WRITING ABOUT VIOLENCE

    Susan Juster, University of Michigan

    March 23, 2012

    WRITING THE PERSONAL AND HISTORICAL IN THE SOUTHWEST BORDERLANDS

    David Adams, Cleveland State

    February 17, 2012

    WHAT IS A BOOK? AND HOW DO WE WRITE ABOUT IT?

    Peter Stallybrass, University of Pennsylvania

    January 20, 2012

    WRITING AND NEW MEDIA panel discussion

    Jana Remy, Chapman and UCI; Elizabeth Losh, UCSD;  Douglas Dechow & Anna Leahy, Chapman

    November 18, 2011

    EARLY MODERN WRITING ABOUT MUSIC

    Carla Zecher, Newberry Library 

    December 9, 2011
  • AxS Festival 2011: Fire and Water

    FIRE SEASON

    William Deverell and Philip Connors

    FIRE SEASON is a conversation between William Deverell, Professor of History and Director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, and Philip Connors, acclaimed author and ardent wilderness look-out in the American Northwest. 

    Deverell and Connors discuss how FIRE and WATER have shaped the region - its politics, its economy and the lives of all of us living in the region, in fire zones and flood plains.

    October 12, 2011
  • Art Along the Hyphen: The Mexican-American Generation

    BECOMING MEXICAN AMERICAN AND BEYOND

    Professor George Sanchez's 1993 study, BECOMING MEXICAN AMERICAN: ETHNICITY, CULTURE, AND IDENTITY IN CHICANO LOS ANGELES, 1900-1945, is considered one of the most influential works on the formation of Latino ethnic identity and culture in pre-World War II Los Angeles.  This symposium brings Professor Sanchez, scholars, educators, and others together for an in-depth exploration and discussion of Latino ethnic identity in the U.S., current research in the field, and the ongoing impact of Sanchez's important book.

    George Sanchez

    October 9, 2011
  • Los Angeles History Research Working Group

    Clark Davis Memorial Lecture:

    RE-IMAGINING INDIAN COUNTRY: AMERICAN INDIANS AND LOS ANGELES

    Nicolas Rosenthal, Loyola Marymount University

    April 20, 2012

    "SEASONED LONG ENOUGH IN CONCENTRATION": SUBURBAN HOMEOWNERSHIP AND TRANSNATIONAL CITIZENSHIP IN THE INLAND SOUTH BAY

    March 16, 2012

    LIBERALS AND THE LEFT IN METROPOLITAN HISTORY, PART II

    Roundtable discussion:

    Mark Clapson, University of Westminster, UK; Lily Geismer, Claremont McKenna; Becky Nicolaides, UCLA; Barbara Soliz, USC

    February 16, 2012

    LIBERALS AND THE LEFT IN METROPOLITAN HISTORY, PART I 

    Roundtable discussion:

    Greg Hise, UNLV; David Levitus, USC; Alyssa Ribiero, University of Pittsburgh;Jess Rigelhaupt, University of Mary Washington; Mark Wild, Cal State Los Angeles

    February 10, 2012

    METROPOLITAN FRONDS: STREET PALMS AND THE FASHIONING OF LOS ANGELES

    Jared Farmer, SUNY Stony Brook

    January 17, 2012

    PROFESSIONALIZATION AND INFLUENCE: THE LOS ANGELES REALTY BOARD AND THE GROWTH OF THE SOUTHLAND, 1903-1923

    Laura Redford, UCLA

    December 2, 2011

    THE BELL POLITICAL CRISIS

    Roundtable discussion:

    Jeff Gottlieb, LA Times; Ruben Vives, LA Times; Jerry Gonzalez, University of Texas, San Antonio; Gilda Ochoa, Pomona College

    November 4, 2011

    EVENT SUMMARY


    REGIONAL EQUITY AND THE INDUSTRIAL CITIES OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY

    Rebecca Overmyer-Velazquez, Whittier College

    October 7, 2011
  • Zocalo Public Square series

    L.A. VS. SAN FRANCISCO: WHO RUNS CALIFORNIA?

    For most of the past half-century, Southern Californians have dominated the highest state offices, including the state governorship.  But in recent years, a young class of talented politicians, including Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and Attorney General Kamala Harris, has risen in San Francisco, while L.A.'s balkanized politics has produced fewer politicians with statewide aim. Compounding the trouble for Southern Californians, San Francisco voters are some of the most engaged in the state - 59 percent of them voted in the November 2010 general election, compared to 43 percent of Angelenos. Is this part of a natural cycle that will soon swing L.A.'s way once again, or symbolic of a permanent shift? Creator and publisher of LA Observed Kevin Roderick; founding editor of Buzz Magazine Allan Mayer; historical geographer and author Gray Brechin; and University of Washington historian Margaret O'Mara visit Zocalo to discuss the Los Angeles-San Francisco rivalry.

    moderated by Conan Nolan

    October 3, 2011
  • ICW In Conversation series

    GREG FISCHER

    Greg Fischer, Los Angeles Planning and Transportation deputy for Council District 9 (downtown) and a member of ICW’s Los Angeles Regional History Planning Group, has lectured to many groups about why Los Angeles exists and how it came to dominate Southern California. In his conversation with Bill Deverell, Fischer will share his research on Los Angeles visionary Arthur Letts, one of the most prominent men in L.A. from the mid-1890’s to the early 1920’s.

    September 30, 2011
  • ICW In Conversation series

    ANNE HYDE

    EMPIRES, NATIONS, AND FAMILIES: A HISTORY OF THE NORTH AMERICAN WEST, 1800-1860 is part of a five-volume series published by the University of Nebraska Press that reassesses the entire field of Western history.

    The book makes clear that the Louisiana Purchase did not involve virgin wilderness discovered by virtuous Anglo entrepreneurs. Rather, the United States was a newcomer in a place already complicated by vying empires.

    The period covered in Hyde’s book spans the fur trade, Mexican War, gold rushes, and the Overland Trail, usually very male-dominated fields of study. Hyde has taken a different approach, and, using letters and business records, documented the broad family associations that crossed national and ethnic boundaries.  According to Hyde, “These folks turned out to be almost entirely people of great wealth and status who loved and married across racial and cultural lines. It turns out that the West of that period is really a mixed race world that made perfect cultural and economic sense until national ideas made that cultural choice impossible in the 1850s."

    August 5, 2011
  • ALOUD at Los Angeles Public Library

    FIRE MONKS: WILDFIRES IN CALIFORNIA - PODCAST

    In Conversation with Bill Deverell

    Colleen Morton Busch and Stephen H. Pyne

    VERSO LECTURE BLOG

    July 19, 2011
  • ICW In Conversation series

    ERIC JOHN ABRAHAMSON

    From the New Deal forward, the promotion of homeownership became a critical component of the regulated and managed economy. Seizing opportunities created by politicians eager to support this new American dream, Howard F. Ahmanson built an empire in Los Angeles that included the largest savings and loan in the nation and made him one of the richest men in America.  He helped promote Southern California’s dramatic growth and encouraged the city’s cultural transformation.  For policymakers, scholars and general readers struggling to understand the mortgage-led financial crisis of the 21st century, Ahmanson’s life and times offer insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the managed economy and the dream of widespread homeownership.

    July 12, 2011
  • ICW Western History Dissertation Workshop

    The Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, the Research Division of The Huntington Library, The Hemispheric Institute of the Americas at the University of California, Davis,  The Howard R. Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders at Yale University, the Institute for the Study of the North American West at the Autry National Center, and the Bill Lane Center for the Study of the North American West at Stanford University invite applications for the sixth annual "Western History Dissertation Workshop." 

    June 11, 2011 

    Huntington Blog posting

  • ICW In Conversation series

    LAWRENCE CULVER

    Author of THE FRONTIER OF LEISURE: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND THE SHAPING OF MODERN AMERICA.  

    Southern California has long been promoted as the playground of the world, the home of resort-style living, backyard swimming pools, and year-round suntans. Tracing the history of Southern California from the late nineteenth century through the late twentieth century, The Frontier of Leisure reveals how this region did much more than just create lavish resorts like Santa Catalina Island and Palm Springs--it literally remade American attitudes towards leisure. Lawrence Culver shows how this "culture of leisure" gradually took hold with an increasingly broad group of Americans, and ultimately manifested itself in suburban developments throughout the Sunbelt and across the United States. This history connects Southern Californian recreation and leisure to larger historical themes, including regional development, architecture and urban planning, labor and race relations, Indian policy, politics, suburbanization, and changing perceptions of nature.

    May 12, 2011
  • ICW In Conversation series

    GABRIELLE BURTON

    We know from history that Tamsen Donner, the pioneer heroine of the 1846 Donner Party, kept a journal, but it was never found.  Combining years of historical research with insight and empathy, Burton imaginatively creates Tamsen’s lost journal, particularly during the four months she was starving and trapped in the mountains with her five daughters and dying husband.   Anchored in Tamsen Donner's compelling story of adventure, love, and motherhood, Burton delves into larger questions about how people confront adversity: Why do some maintain hope, while others give up?  At its heart, IMPATIENT WITH DESIRE: THE LOST JOURNAL OF TAMSEN DONNER is a story of hope, heroism, and the enduring human spirit.

    May 5, 2011
  • ICW Los Angeles History Research Group

    Clark Davis Memorial Lecture:

    MOTHER OF CONSERVATISM: WOMEN AND THE POSTWAR RIGHT

    Michelle Nickerson, University of Texas at Dallas

    April 16, 2011
  • ICW In Conversation series

    ERIKA ESAU

    Fulbright Scholar and art historian Erika Esau has just published IMAGES OF THE PACIFIC RIM: AUSTRALIA AND CALIFORNIA, 1850-1935 (Power Publications) on the aesthetic connections between Australia and the American West. From gold rush photography to Spanish style houses, the absorption of images into the everyday life of these “new” Western societies constructed distinctive cultural iconographies and helped to create a sense of place based upon a shared ocean and climate. Esau works presently as librarian at LACMA’s Rifkind Center of German Expressionist Studies.

    March 30, 2011
  • ICW Los Angeles History Research Group

    NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM: CIVIL WAR TO CIVIL RIGHTS IN CALIFORNIA

    Benjamin Cawthra, Michelle Antenesse, Bethany Girod - CSU Fullerton

    March 12, 2011
  • Autry Western History Workshop 2010-2011

    EXTRACTING GRAVITY'S CAPITAL: CREATING THE COMSTOCK'S INDUSTRIAL WATERSHED

    Robert Chester, University of the Pacific

    April 12, 2011

    People, Peoples, and Politics in Borderlands: Blood Talk in New Mexico

    Brian Delay, UC Berkeley

    Joint session with ICW Borderlands Group

    March 8, 2011
  • Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West
  • Department of History
  • University of Southern California
  • Los Angeles, California 90089-0034