Fall 2014 Courses

  • Hist 100gm: The American Experience

    Perl-Rosenthal

    Monday / Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Patterns of American development from Colonial times to the present. Duplicates credit in former Hist 200. 

  • Hist 102gm: Medieval People: Early Europe and its Neighbors, 400-1500

    Glenn

    Monday / Wednesday

    10:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    There is a great diversity in the peoples who shaped the social, political, religious, and intellectual landscapes of European lands from the fourth through the fourteenth century.  In this course, we shall study them.  In particular, we shall explore the works of a number of individuals from four (distinct?) periods in the hope that, by getting to know them (both the works and their authors), we can learn about the various groups to which they belonged and the cultures from which they come.  In other words, our rigorous study of primary sources of various genres — narrative histories, biographies, laws, theological treatises, philosophical tracts, poems, letters, literature, and the visual remains of the period — will enable us to glimpse at least some of the norms and institutions of the different peoples who populated Europe during the period generally known as the Middle Ages.  We shall attempt to determine what some of these norms and institutions are and their similarities and/or differences across time and place as we visit the Late Antique World of the fourth century, the Barbarian West of sixth through eighth centuries, the Age of Cathedrals and Chivalry in twelfth-century northern France, and Late Medieval Italy (thirteenth- and fourteenth-centuries).  What do these cultures share? our authors? their works?  How are they alike?  And how do they differ?  From the sources, students are encouraged — indeed, really required — to develop their own answers to these questions over the course of the semester.  Lectures will, at times, supplement our readings, but much of class time will be devoted to discussion of the sources as we analyze what they can (and cannot) tell us about their authors, about the cultures in which they lived, and about the pasts (real or imagined) out of which their cultures and Europe grew.

  • Hist 103g: The Emergence of Modern Europe

    O'Neill 

    Monday / Wednesday

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    Between 1350 and 1800 there lived many individuals whose names remain familiar to us today: Michelangelo, Gutenberg, Christopher Columbus, Martin Luther, Napoleon. However, where their importance lies and how they fit into the larger picture of the period is less well known and this class seeks to explore, among other things, who made Michelangelo’s art possible, why Columbus sailed the ocean blue, why the printing press was important, and who besides Martin Luther participated in the Reformation. During this period people faced massive religious change, new forms of knowledge, changing forms of governance, a geographical reorientation and all the upheaval put in motion by these alterations. This class traces the causes and consequences of these changes. It asks why the Italian city states gained so much power in the fifteenth century and why they became the crucible of the Renaissance. It looks at the impact of the Reformation upon people’s sense of self and upon forms of government. It examines the reasons behind the growth of the state, the consequences of European imperial expansion, and the influence changing forms of knowledge had upon this world. It asks why we see this period as witnessing and producing what we call the “modern” world.

  • Hist 104g: Modern Europe

    Accampo

    Tuesday / Thursday

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    This course falls within the General Education category Cultures and Civilizations I, which is designed to “introduce students to the norms and patterns of civilizations associated with the Greco-Roman and European traditions and the legacy of those traditions in North America.” The course will focus on three main themes, each of which forged new conceptions about human rights and the relationship between the individual and the broader society and state in the context of European nations as well as in their global interactions. These themes include the 1) democratic and industrial revolutions; 2) the emergence of nation-states, imperial conquest, and  industrial and cultural technologies that advanced accompanying ideologies;  3) totalitarianism, global warfare, and decolonization. The primary goal of this course is to attain an understanding of the historical roots of the politics and cultures that dominate western societies, and that have served as a model—rightly or wrongly—for young democracies, or those countries trying to establish democracy—in our contemporary world.

     

    Privileging the power of rational thought and the belief in unlimited human potential, the eighteenth-century Enlightenment offered the promise of universal liberty and equality, and the optimistic belief in human progress.  But as reformers and revolutionaries attempted to put these lofty ideas into practice, they in turn created new hierarchies and new criteria for excluding people from citizenship and for denying them civil and political rights.  Through the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth, if the concept “human” applied to everyone, it did not apply to everyone equally, and “rights” varied according to age, class, gender, religious, and racial status. By the early twentieth century, faith in “progress” resulted in the extremes of global warfare, totalitarian ideologies, and genocide. The unifying theme—and challenge—of this course is to understand how people in western culture conceived of and experienced human rights in various historical contexts, and how they justified denying rights to certain categories of people while privileging others.  In this context we will examine power relationships between and among states and individuals, race and ethnic groups, social classes, gender identities, and colonizers and colonized.

  • Hist 105: The Korean Past

    Hwang

    Tuesday / Thursday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Several themes will run through our exploration of Korean history from the very beginning of historical records to the present day:  1. Korean Identity and Character; 2. Relationship to the Outside World; 3. Forms of Political Rule; 4. Social Order and Hierarchy; 5. Women and Family; 6. Religion; and 7. Economy and Daily Life.  These themes, often interacting with each other, will appear repeatedly, and the challenge will be to determine how each theme remains consistent as well as how each theme develops in accordance with the historical context of any given time.  A final important theme will be the country’s Modern Transformation, especially its history in the 20th century.  In addition to primary sources, the readings will largely come from the instructor's text: KM Hwang, A History of Korea (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010; also available as a Kindle ebook)

     

    Assignments and Examinations

    A chapter from the course text must be read before each lecture session in order to prepare for the instructor's presentation and for debating a historiographical or historical question that the assignment chapter raises.  Much of the class time for "lecture" will be taken up by these open discussions.  As for written assignments, students will write several short papers (2-3 pages each) that analyze and critique the primary source readings, the course text, and a special lecture.  Students will take a traditional in-class midterm examination, which will be in essay format, and a final examination submitted online.  Finally, all students will need to pass a map quiz by the third week of class.

  • Hist 180g: The Middle East

    Rouighi

    Tuesday / Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    Introduction to the history and the study of the Middle East from ancient to modern times.

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    Glenn

    Monday / Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Although it comes in perhaps as many versions as instructors who teach it, History 201 typically aims to offer students a somewhat systematic overview of a range of approaches to the study of the past, that is, to the discipline of History.  This version of the course has no such ambitions.  Instead, it consists of a hodge-podge of exercises and undertakings designed to raise questions and problems of the sort historians must consider in their reflection on the past and in their research and writing about it. 

     

    There are four essential, if seemingly distinct, elements of this course; some of them will be interwoven over the course of the term; others will stand alone with no obvious connection to the others. 

     

    1.  Over the course of the term, students shall create a personal archive of their own writing and documents related to — and which relate — their lives and experiences.  These archives will ultimately be combined so as to create a body of material, a class archive, that students will then use to write a term paper about some aspect of our world.  This paper will be informed by the types of historical questions and methodological considerations we develop over the course of the term and based exclusively on the class’s archival materials that we have at our disposal.

     

    2.  We shall also read a series of seminal essays written by scholars and watch a handful of films.  In different ways, these essays and films will articulate and illustrate some of the fundamental problems and questions with which historians have struggled in the modern study of the past.  They will also inform our creation and analysis of the personal and class archives.

     

    3.  In an effort to learn how to read current scholarship and frame historical questions, we shall read together one (as yet to be determined) monographs.

     

    4.  Each student will study the work of one faculty member of the history department.  Indeed, students can choose any scholar whose work they wish to read, read one of their books, analyze their approaches to their topic and the ways they’ve chosen to present their findings.  Students will each offer a short presentation in class about the historian and, ultimately, a brief written review of the work in comparison to one of the monographs from no. 3, above.   Of course, like every other piece of writing students do, this review will be included in the student’s personal and thus the class archive.

     

    Perhaps it goes without saying that this is a demanding course.  Students will be expected to write regularly and in various genres.  They will be expected to read carefully one another’s writing.  And it is my expectation that all students come to all class meetings and that everyone is prepared for class discussion and participates actively in it. 

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    Ethington

    Tuesday / Thursday

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    Methods and theories of historical interpretation of evidence; uses of archives; modes of presenting the past to the public. Required of all History majors. Duplicates credit in former HIST 300.

  • Hist 225g: Film, Power, and American History

    Ross

    Monday / Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Few contemporary institutions have a greater effect on molding popular understandings of the world than film and television.  Yet, most citizens lack the critical tools to contextualize, analyze, and critique the images and ideologies conveyed on the screen.  This course is designed  to join  elements of film studies with  various schools of historical thought  to provide  students  with the critical skills needed to analyze the  images  and ideologies  they see on the screen and understand how those images effect  our views of the past and present.  This course is part of the Social Issues category of GE.   We examine many of the fundamental social, political, and economic problems that have shaped the 20th century: industrialization, urbanization, war, poverty, crime, politics, success, race, class, and gender conflict.   We will analyze these issues from three different  perspectives:  (a) films made during the period that address those issues; (b) primary  documents that shed light on those issues; (c) historical overviews of those issues.

     

         Our films and documents cover the period from 1900 to 2010. The films we watch (which include fiction films, documentaries, and newsreels) were made during that decade and deal with one or more of the major problems of the time.  But movies offer only one perspective on the world.  Each week will also read works that offer additional perspectives: readings that discuss the general historical events of the era; readings that discuss what is happening in the motion picture industry; and readings that offer primary documents of the period.   In short, we will triangulate our way through American history.   It is the student's job to figure out which of these perspectives seems most convincing, why it seems so, and the implications of one form of knowledge being more powerful than another.

     

    Class Format: Monday meetings will provide students with a broad overview of the era.  They feature a lecture and clips from various newsfilms and documentaries about the era.  Wednesdays will generally be spent viewing and discussing films (two caveats on films:  films listed in syllabus are subject to change depending on availability; my goal is to show repetition of certain kinds of images—consequently we will often see only parts of listed films).   Students will learn how to "read" the political ideology embedded in films. ALL Students must enroll in a weekly discussion section.  Discussion sections will be run as seminars in which students will analyze the week's readings and discuss the similarities and dissimilarities in what historians, primary sources, and filmmakers say about a particular era.  We will also try to reach some final synthesis concerning the popular images and realities of the age.   What can movies tell us that history books cannot?  What can history books can tell us that movies cannot? 

     

    Requirements:  The course includes a midterm (20%), final exam (30%), and term paper (20%); class participation (including written assignments) will constitute an additional 30% of the final grade.  We expect students to attend ALL classes and discussion sections; unexcused absence from class or discussion section will affect your grade.  All work submitted must be written entirely by the student. Plagiarism will result in an F in the course and the initiation of expulsion proceedings.   Discussion readings must be completed by Friday.

     

    Required Readings:

    Robert Marcus & David Burner, America Firsthand, VOL II (*course packet at bookstore)

    Steven J. Ross, Movies and American Society

    Steven J. Ross, Working-Class Hollywood: Silent Film and the Shaping of Class in America

    Elaine May, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era (20th anniversary edtn.)

    Maurice Isserman and Michael Kazin, America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s (4th edtn)

    George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (Centennial edtn; Thomas Pynchon preface

  • Hist 240: The History of California

    Ethington

    Monday / Wednesday

    10:00-11:50pm

    Course Description:

    A thematic approach to California history from precontact to present; focus on peoples, environment, economic, social, and cultural development, politics, and rise to global influence.

  • Hist 265g: Understanding Race and Sex Historically

    Williams

    Tuesday / Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    Historians have produced important new insights about the past by exploring the interplay between the categories of race and sex.  Through analysis of key historical events and movements, this course demonstrates that race and sex, rather than attributes fixed in nature, are socially and historically constructed categories.  It also shows the powerful impact they have had in shaping ideas of citizenship.  

     

    Learning Objectives 

    This course is designed to prepare students for informed citizenship by teaching them how to analyze compelling national social problems concerning race and sex in historical terms.  This will include building such skills as chronological reasoning, contextualization, historical argumentation, and unpacking complex visual sources.  Students will learn how race and sex have structured and been structured by laws concerning marriage, slavery, immigration, and public space.  They will also learn how science has been enlisted in the service of granting legitimacy and a sense of permanence to transitory ideas of race and sex.  They will obtain familiarity with key watershed events in U.S. history from the mid-seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries, including the framing of the U.S. Constitution, the lead-up to and aftermath of the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, and the development of federal immigration policies in the late nineteenth century.

     

    Most reading is available on Blackboard; students are also required to purchase Nell Irvin Painter's book, The History of White People (Norton, 2010).

  • Hist 266g: Business and East Asian Culture, 1800-Present

    Sheehan

    Tuesday / Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    How do we account for the economic rise of the West in the period since 1800 (perhaps 1500?) and the subsequent economic rise of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore)?  In order to answer that question, this class argues that we need to think about business and its links with economics on the one hand and politics, culture, and society on the other.

     

    This course will challenge students to link the history of the corporation and other forms of business organization in East Asia to broad narratives of cultural, social, economic, and political change.  Students will use case studies of various industries and business enterprises as their primary source of inspiration and then link these cases back to their cultural, social, economic and political context in discussion and writing.

     

    We will focus on three themes:

     

    1)       East Asian Business Model.  Is there an “East Asian Model” for successful (profitable and / or competitive) business behaviors?  Or, is there a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean model?

    2)       East Asian Economic Model.  Is there an East Asian model for a successful (growth-promoting) business environment and how does it differ from the West?  Or is there a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean model?  How do businesses respond to their environments?

    3)       Business and Its Context.  How can the study of business show the ways in which economics are related to culture, politics, and society?

     

    Course Methodology: Reading Cases

    Each week students will read one or more case studies about business or economic activities.  Many of these cases are drawn from the Harvard Business School Case Book.  These cases will provide the basis for discussions and papers.

  • Hist 271g: Early Native American Studies

    Mancall

    Monday / Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    An exploration of the history of Native America peoples and the ways they understood and explained the changes in their lives from 1492 to 1840.

  • Hist 305: From Goddesses to Witches:  Women in Premodern Europe

    Bitel

    Tuesday / Thursday

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    Social, cultural and political contexts of women's spiritualities in Europe from the Paleolithic to the Reformation. Topics include: goddess-worship; Christian and Jewish contexts; male attitudes.

  • Hist 312: The Age of the French Revolution and Napoleon

    Accampo

    Tuesday / Thursday

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Why devote an entire course to one event and the “age” that surrounds it? As with any major historical turning point, the French Revolution and the wars it provoked are a culmination and conjuncture of many complex developments that historians continue to reinterpret. Revolution and war had dramatic and enduring impacts on western and world civilizations.  A close examination of the French Revolution offers keys to understanding not only the past but our contemporary world as well, for many of the issues it addressed and created remain central concerns of human societies.  One of these issues is the political use of terror in the name of “freedom,” and how the modern meaning of terrorism has evolved.

     

    This course will focus on understanding the paradoxes of nascent democracy, such as tensions between individual rights and civic duties, between freedom and equality, and between competing definitions of citizenship. We will examine how representative bodies formed, how they developed constitutions, whom they excluded, and how they established new hierarchies. We will consider how gender, class, and race became central issues in political and civil rights, what impact Napoleon had on France and Europe, and finally, the broader impacts of the Revolution’s enduring legacy. Do the Jacobins, with their use of terror, remain the “heralds of our future?”

    Note: This course counts toward the Law, History, and Culture major.

  • Hist 317gm: North American Indians in American Public Life

    Thompson

    Tuesday / Thursday

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Role of American Indians in American public life from colonial times to the present; native American forms of government; relations between tribes and the U.S.

     

    Crosslist: This course is offered by the ANTH department but may qualify for major credit in HIST.  To register, enroll in ANTH 316.




  • Hist 324g: Islam in Russia and the Soviet Union

    Rorlich

    Tuesday / Thursday

    10:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    This course is designed for General Education credit in the category Cultures and Civilizations II. It focuses on the  study of those Inner Eurasian societies whose cultures and identities were shaped by Islam, as well as by their encounter with the colonial ”other”, be it in its Tsarist or Soviet form. Consequently, it is aimed at equipping students with the basic empirical information and analytical approaches   that will enable them to understand the dynamics of religion, culture, and politics in shaping one of the world’s major civilizations. Guided by a comparative perspective, this class focuses on an area outside the “core” Middle Eastern countries, and makes a contribution to better understanding the cultural diversity of the “Muslim World” against the background of its unity of faith. Its focus on an area outside the “core” makes it possible to identify the remarkable diversity of “Russian Islam”, forged as it was, by the interaction of the settled and nomadic, urban and rural, Muslim and non-Muslim societies.

  • Hist 327: 20th Century Britain

    O'Neill

    Tuesday / Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    Through the course of the twentieth century, Britain went from having an empire upon which the sun never set to being reduced almost to the size of Shakespeare’s “blessed plot.” Yet, Britain in 2000 was obviously not Shakespeare’s England and the twentieth century left indelible marks – the “lost generation” of World War I, Churchill and the Blitz, the growth of the welfare state, and the loss of empire. The century was one of vast change and, if not decline, than of reconfiguration. The twentieth century forced the British to reconceptualize the place of the state in their lives and the place of their country in the world. In this course we will try to figure out why these changes occurred, how the British dealt with them, and what they say about Britain’s future. To do so we will focus upon Britain’s relationship with the rest of the world, upon the economic, social, and psychological consequences of two world wars, upon the British people’s ideas about class and the growth of the welfare state, and finally upon Britons’ conception of themselves and their own history.

     

    Readings & Films:

    George Bernard Shaw, John Bull’s Other Island

    John Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps

    Vera Brittain, Testament of Youth

    George Orwell, The Orwell Reader

    Evelyn Waugh, Put Out More Flags

    Samuel Selvon, The Lonely Londoners

    Gunga Din (1939)

    Mrs. Miniver (1942)

    The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

    Look Back in Anger (1958)

    Seven-Up (1964)

    28-Up (1984)

    Skyfall (2012)

  • Hist 334: History of the Samurai

    Piggott

    Monday / Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Development of the Samurai from a warrior elite to political hegemons between the 8th and 12th centuries; use of primary sources, introduction to divergent historiographies. Recommended preparation: a course in Japanese history

  • Hist 351: The American Revolution

    Perl-Rosenthal

    Monday / Wednesday

    10:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    Origins, course and consequences of the American Revolution; the post-war establishment of the Constitution.

  • Hist 355: The African-American Experience

    Wilson

    Tuesday

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    This course provides an historical and social analysis of peoples of African descent in the United States from Colonial times to the present.  We will use primary and secondary sources, films, , and the visual arts to explore black American history from 1619-to the present. 

  • Hist 358: U.S. Gay and Lesbian History

    Miller

    Monday / Wednesday

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Exploration of shifting social organization and cultural meanings of same-sex desire and cross-gender behaviors in the U.S., primarily during the 20th century.

    Crosslist: This course is offered by the SWMS department but may qualify for major credit in HIST. To register, enroll in SWMS 358.

  • Hist 389: Modern Iran

    Khafipour

    Monday / Wednesday

    10:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    History and culture of modern Iran from the nineteenth century to present through historical and ethnographic approaches to Iran today, richly contextualizing events and people.

    Crosslist: This course is offered by the MDES department but may qualify for major credit in HIST. To register, enroll in MDES 313.

  • Hist 416: History of Imperial Russia, 1689-1917

    Rorlich

    Wednesday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    The collapse of the Soviet Union had an impact on the world of scholarship as well, by making it possible  for scholars to launch new lines of scholarly inquiry which, among others, have been addressing  issues such as the reconceptualization of the imperial period of Russian history .The survey of Imperial Russia , History 416, is representative of this trend.

     

    Informed by new lines of scholarship, this course will focus on the analysis of the structures, transformations, and continuities of the imperial period from Peter the Great to Nicholas II, without privileging one kind of history –  be it political, social, economic, cultural, or  institutional. Instead, throughout this course we will aim to highlight the interconnectedness of developments  that are the domain of these various “slices” of history, and will  discuss their contribution to shaping the fabric of Imperial Russia’s history

  • Hist 441: Modern World History

    Goldstein

    Tuesday / Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    Who says we can’t predict the future?

     

    The 2013 United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (UN IPCC) stated in their summary report: “It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century” where “extremely likely” means 98% certainty.  In other words: the scientific community is more certain that human activity is causing global warming than that cigarettes cause lung cancer.  

     

    How warm will it get and how soon? Well, according to one touted modeling study, by the year 2047 every year will be hotter than any year ever was before that. Camilo Mora, the lead author of this study, puts it this way: “Go back in your life to think about the hottest, most traumatic event you have experienced,” Dr. Mora said in an interview. “What we’re saying is that very soon, that event is going to become the norm.” (NYTimes article will be read)

     

    In this course we will first get acquainted with what the global climate and regional environments will be like by the time most of you are 53 years old.  Following that cognitive trauma we will then try to look at human history and the discipline of history itself to ask how you all managed to be born into what will almost certainly be the next-to-last generation to get to see a living coral reef or an actual glacier.

     

    Topics of discussion will include: the 6th extinction, the idea of the Anthropocene; historical links and analogies between climate change and slavery, genocide, the nuclear arms race, and globalization; the recent history (1980s to the present) of denial of climate change and the campaigns (intended and perhaps at times unintended) of disinformation; and what (if anything) can be done; In addition to analyzing readings, films and other materials, assignments will include more personal and/or creative projects. The big historical questions will hopefully lead us to questions about how we as individuals, communities, institutions, and a species might face the future history we have already made.

  • Hist 444: Mass Violence and Comparative Genocide in Modern World History

    Gruner

    Tuesday / Thursday

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    Systematic mass murder of large populations is one of the main features of Modern world history. Thus, this seminar will methodically explore and compare the origins, developments and forms of mass violence and genocide, focusing especially on the dark 20th century. Using both primary and secondary sources we will start with the study of the mass murder of indigenous people in different parts of the world from the 16th until the early 20th century (Colonial genocides form the Spanish conquest of the Americas until the massacres of the Herero in South West Africa by the Germans). The main focus lies on the exploration of the genocide of Armenians and other Christians in Turkey during World War I, the Holocaust against the Jews and the genocides in Cambodia and Ruanda. For comparative reasons the genocides following the partition of India and Pakistan as well as in Bangladesh and Guatemala are included, In contrast to common approaches, we will especially investigate the preconditions and early stages of persecution to discuss the transition to mass murder. For this purpose, we will also discuss case studies from Africa and the Americas, where groups were fiercely discriminated against without being exterminated. Analyzing these cases and others, we will compare the factors which motivated states and groups throughout history to instigate mass murder as well as people to participate in these mass crimes. We will trace the history of the public discussion about Genocides and dig into the still vital debate about an appropriate definition of mass extermination.

     

    Required Reading:

    Donald Bloxham: The Great Game of Genocide: Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians, New York: Oxford University Press 2007 (Paperback)

    Ben Kiernan: The Pol Pot regime, Race, Power and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge 1975-1979, New Haven et.al: Yale University Press 2008 (Paperback).

    Wolf Gruner, Jewish Forced Labor under the Nazis: Economic Needs and Racial Aims, 1938-1944, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008 (Paperback)

    Scott Strauss: The Order of Genocide: Race, Power, and War in Rwanda, Harlow et.al: Pearson Longman (Paperback 2006).

    Etelle Higonnet: Quiet Genocide: Guatemala 1981-1983, New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers (2008) (Hardcover).

    Nancy L. Clark and William H. Worger: South Africa: The Rise and Fall of Apartheid, Ithaca: Cornell UP (Paperback 2004).

  • Hist 446: Resistance to Genocide

    Gruner

    Tuesday / Thursday

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Attention: Former attendance of a class on Holocaust or Genocide is recommended.

     

    The research seminar is aimed to teach skills and methods of historical research via exploring a vital question for today’s world: What enables people to oppose or resist racist ideologies, state discrimination practices or the active participation in mass atrocities? The students will approach the question by studying the historical conditions first and then developing projects independently researching acts of resistance to Genocides with a focus on Rwanda, Guatemala, Cambodia and the Holocaust.

     

    While most research on genocide prevention has attempted to identify the ideological or political causes which led to the Holocaust and other genocides, and more recently, why people commit murder, the theme of the seminar -resistance- has rarely been addressed. When the topic has been discussed, it has been mostly restricted, as in the example of the Holocaust, to organized or armed group resistance by Jews, Poles or Germans, or, more recently, to rescue efforts for the victims. While there is literature on the Holocaust available, publications on the resistance in other Genocides are scarce. This class will systematically enquire why certain individuals or groups do not necessarily follow the path of mass violence, especially at an early stage of such developments. Which personal, psychological, social, political, ideological and/or economic factors support individuals to resist discrimination and violence?

     

    Thus, the aim of the seminar is to encourage student original research on resisters using the internationally unique resources available at USC, as the 52,000 audio visual testimonies of holocaust survivors at the Shoah Foundation Institute archive as well as audio interviews and written testimonies from other genocides. Students will conduct interviews in the Greater Los Angeles area which inhabits large genocide survivor communities of Cambodia, Guatemala and the Holocaust. At the end, some of the student research results may be published with an online platform. 

  • Hist 453: The Age of Emancipation

    Williams

    Tuesday / Thursday

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Slavery extended well beyond the geographical borders of the U.S. South, and struggles over emancipation took place well before and after the 1860s.  Through a focus on landmark legal cases ranging from the late 18th through the late 19th centuries, we will investigate when the Age of Emancipation was, why it came about, and who it principally affected.  We will pay special attention to the different methods by which those defined as “chattel” slaves in the Atlantic World both attained and redefined the meaning of liberty.  A central focus of this course will be the relationship between slavery and the evolution of racial status law over the course of the long 19th century.  Active participation in weekly discussions and the development of a substantial research paper will constitute the main basis for the grade. 

  • Hist 461: 19th Century American Thought

    Fox

    Wednesday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    In the nineteenth century the United States produced an astonishing array of creative and influential thinkers, from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Abraham Lincoln, and Walt Whitman before the Civil War to Edward Bellamy, William James, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and John Dewey after the war. 

     

    This course combines the reading of these and other writers with an 15-page research paper, using primary and secondary sources, on a thinker or theme of your choice.  Special attention will be devoted throughout the course to the topics of race, religion, gender and politics.  But many other themes will intersect with these, and you are invited to pursue any of them in your research paper, which will be produced in stages over the course of the term.  

  • Hist 465: America in the Cold War World, 1945-1991

    Westwick

    Monday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    The Cold War was one of the main drivers of world history in the second half of the 20th century.  The ideological clash between democratic capitalism and totalitarian communism continues to reverberate in American society and international relations.  The superpower standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union avoided direct military confrontation, but found expression in the nuclear arms race, espionage and propaganda, proxy wars in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, and cultural competition.   This course examines how the Cold War started, what kept it going for several decades, and how it ended.  The course will discuss how the Cold War shaped American life, through topics such as popular culture, race and civil rights, sex and gender, and the environment, including particular influence on Southern California.  

  • Hist 480: Seminar in Middle East History

    Rouighi

    Tuesday / Thursday

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    This is a seminar about recent scholarship on the Middle East.

  • Hist 492: Honors Thesis

    Sheehan

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    This course is designed to help students complete their honors thesis as part of the requirements for receiving honors in the department of history.

     

    The emphasis in the course will be on practical steps for completing the thesis and on creating a community within which we share our work and learn from each other.  Many students have found writing an honors thesis one of the most rewarding experiences of their time at USC and you should think seriously about accepting the challenge.

    In order to register for this class, students must complete a “Stage II Honors Application” and submit it to me through the department in SOS 153.  In addition, all students are warmly encouraged to meet with me as soon as possible to discuss their thesis plans.

  • Hist 498: Music and Media in America

    Goodman

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    From Thomas Edison's phonograph to Steve Jobs' iPod, music and media have long ben mutually reinforcing areas in American popular culture. This seminar explores the history of American music and media from the colonial period to the present. The course is based on the music media materials housed at USC Doheny Library Special collections. We will cover the technological and electronic innovations that changed how music is disseminated, inquire into how listening devices affect how people consume music, dive into the history of copyright and piracy, and track the rise of a powerful commercial recording industry. Students will gain a firm understanding of the history of American music and media, and will develop individual projects based on the materials in Special Collections.

  • Hist 498: The Print Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    O'Neill

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    There is no lack of news in today’s world: CNN’s Headline News in on 24/7 and newspapers on the internet are available at the click of a few buttons. But what was it like to live in a society where this was not the case? The term “media” was coined in the twentieth century, but the early modern world was just as concerned with words and their uses. It was the early modern period that supposedly saw a revolution in both print and news. In fact, some people see Gutenberg’s invention of moveable type as kicking off the early modern period. This seminar is concerned with how people communicated during this period, how communication changed, and how communication influenced and was influenced by religious and political upheavals. It will look at modes of communication that were not dependent upon print like spectacles and plays. It will look at the advent of print and will investigate to what extent print culture was “revolutionary.” It will also look at the rise of modern modes of media like the newspaper and will inspect how people might have approached them. Finally, it will consider to what extent these new forms of communication created a “public sphere,” a space within which all people discussed and made decisions about how the world around should be governed. This is a course about the dissemination, control and transformative abilities of information and will result in a research paper being produced by each student.

    Readings:

    York Mystery Plays

    James Shapiro, A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, 1599

    Peter Burke, The Fabrication of Louis XIV

    Letters of Bess of Harwick

    Elizabeth Eisenstien, The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    Miles Ogborn, India Ink: Script & Print in the Making of the East India Company

    Richard Darnton, The Forbidden Bestsellers of Pre-Revolutionary France

Student Advising

Advising

Interested in a History Major or Minor?

 The History Department has a dual advising system.  Melissa Borek, our Student Services Advisor, helps History students navigate the Department and University requirements.  Faculty advisors help students plan their major and offer guidance for pursuing the field of history both within and beyond USC.


To declare a major or address questions and issues concerning Dornsife College and University requirments or to have advising holds lifted, see Melissa Borek, SOS 153, (213) 740-1659.


To discuss History Majors, Minors, the Honors Program, overseas studies, courses, funding, internships, honors societies, or careers, make an appointment or visit the Faculty Advisors during their weekly office hours.


Fall 2014

Faculty Advising Schedule 

 

Professor Ethington:

SOS 167

Mondays| 3:00pm-6:00pm


Professor Glenn:

SOS 163

Mondays| 8:00am-9:00am

Wednesdays| 8:00am-10:00am


Professor Rorlich:

SOS 258

Thursdays| 10:00am-2:00pm

 

 


For more information, contact Professor Lon Kurashige, Director of Undergraduate Studies, SOS 264, (213) 740-1666.

  • Department of History
  • 3502 Trousdale Parkway
  • Social Sciences Building (SOS) 153
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 90089-0034