Fall 2013 Courses

  • Hist 100gm: The American Experience

    Perl-Rosenthal

    Tuesday/Thursday

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    This course will introduce you to the history of North America from the era of first settlement, over 10,000 years ago, through the present—with an emphasis on the period ca. 1500-1950.  This course satisfies the General Education requirement in Category 1, Western Cultures and Traditions, as well as the University’s Diversity requirement.  Several major themes will run through our study of American history: the concept of empire will serve as an organizing principle from beginning to end; we will pay close attention to the movement of peoples, both voluntary and involuntary; and the dialectic between free and unfree will reappear time and again.  In addition to providing you with an historical overview of American history, you will also have the opportunity to try your hand at critical reading of scholarly writing and do your own research project.

    Required textbooks (for purchase at USC Bookstore)

    W.W. Norton bundle, which includes:

    • Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty!
    • Foner, ed., Voices of Liberty
    • Joyce Chaplin, ed., The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
    • W. Andrews & W. McFeely, eds., Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

    Allan Greer, ed., The Jesuit Relations (Bedford/St. Martin’s)

    Norman Yetman, ed., When I Was a Slave (Dover)

    John Dos Passos, The 42nd Parallel (Mariner)

  • History 100gm: The American Experience

    Kurashige

    Tuesday/Thursday

    3:30-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    Patterns of American development from Colonial times to the present. Duplicates credit in former Hist 200.

  • Hist 101g: The Ancient World

    Fischer-Bovet

    Monday/Wednesday

    12:00-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    This course fulfills the General Education requirement in Category I, Western Cultures and Traditions, and introduces students to the history and culture of the ancient world from the beginning of humankind until the fragmentation of the Mediterranean world around 500 CE. It will provide them with a global historical perspective and will teach students to think historically by connecting past and present and by asking questions of the past for a better understanding of the present. We will alternate between a comparative world approach and more in-depth investigations of the political, socio-economic and cultural developments occurring in the Mediterranean basin. Our unifying analytical framework will allow us to examine how human beings in different cultural areas responded differently to common problems and how this variety of responses shaped the society, economy, and polity over time.

    Students will learn how to use and analyze primary sources, from the critical reading of literary texts, inscriptions, and papyri (in translation) to the examination of monumental buildings and tombs. Starting with the expansion of agriculture and the growth of the first empires in Mesopotamia and Egypt, we will explore processes behind imperialism, movement of population, and cultural interaction and we will point out the place of these different civilizations in the western imagination. We will observe the emergence of democratic city-states in Greece and the intellectual developments that took place in this context. We will scrutinize the growth of trade and the appearance of large cities. We will discuss the rise and fall of empires, compare the trajectories of Rome and China and trace the spread of Christianity.

  • Hist 102gm: Medieval People: Early Europe and its Neighbors, 400-1500

    Glenn

    Monday/Wednesday

    10:00-11:50a

    Course Description:

    There is a great diversity in the peoples who shaped the social, political, religious, and intellectual landscapes of European lands from the fourth through the fourteenth century.  In this course, we shall study them.  In particular, we shall explore the works of a number of individuals from four (distinct?) periods in the hope that, by getting to know them (both the works and their authors), we can learn about the various groups to which they belonged and the cultures from which they come.  In other words, our rigorous study of primary sources of various genres — narrative histories, biographies, laws, theological treatises, philosophical tracts, poems, letters, literature, and the visual remains of the period — will enable us to glimpse at least some of the norms and institutions of the different peoples who populated Europe during the period generally known as the Middle Ages. 

    We shall attempt to determine what some of these norms and institutions are and their similarities and/or differences across time and place as we visit the Late Antique World of the fourth century, the Barbarian West of sixth through eighth centuries, the Age of Cathedrals and Chivalry in twelfth-century northern France, and Late Medieval Italy (thirteenth- and fourteenth-centuries).  What do these cultures share? our authors? their works?  How are they alike?  And how do they differ?  From the sources, students are encouraged — indeed, really required — to develop their own answers to these questions over the course of the semester.  Lectures will, at times, supplement our readings, but much of class time will be devoted to discussion of the sources as we analyze what they can (and cannot) tell us about their authors, about the cultures in which they lived, and about the pasts (real or imagined) out of which their cultures and Europe grew.

  • Hist 103g: The Emergence of Modern Europe

    Harkness

    Monday/Wednesday

    12:00-1:50p

    Course Description:

    This course is designed to introduce students to western European history between 1450 and 1800.  This period, which historians refer to as the “early modern” period, was a time of great change when social, political, religious, economic, and cultural systems inherited from the Middle Ages began to buckle and collapse under new stresses and challenges.  Many noteworthy episodes of European history—the Italian Renaissance, the voyages of Columbus, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution—took place during this period.  We will be focusing on these episodes to see what they can tell us about how early modern Europeans grappled with the many changes they faced.  In our readings and discussions we will be focusing on issues such as human rights, the rights of women, the rights of the poor, the rights of religious and ethnic minorities, and perceptions of the “other.”

    Grades will be based on two 6-8 page papers, a midterm, a final, and participation in mandatory discussion sections.

    Readings MAY include (please note, this is a tentative list)

    Noble, et. al.  Western Civilization:  Beyond Boundaries  vol. B, 1300-1815

    Gene Brucker, Giovanni and Lusanna: Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence

    Symcox and Sullivan, Christopher Columbus and the Enterprise of the Indies

    Barbara Diefendorf, The Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre

    Dava Sobel, Galileo’s Daughter:  A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love

    Allison, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

    Lynn Hunt, The French Revolution and Human Rights

     

  • Hist 104g: Modern Europe

    Lerner

    Tuesday/Thursday

    9:30-10:50a

    Course Description:

    This course explores selected themes in the history of modern Europe, starting with the philosophical innovations of the Enlightenment, the political achievements of the French Revolution, and the economic and social consequences of industrialization.  Rather than attempting a comprehensive, chronological survey of this period of European history, the class offers an in depth exploration of five major topics: (1) The Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Making of Modern Politics; (2) The Industrial Revolution and the Liberal Order: Politics, Class and Gender; (3) Empire, Race and the “New Imperialism”; (4) The End of the Liberal Order: World War I, Modernism and Revolution; and (5) Counterrevolution:  War, Fascism and Mass Death in the Twentieth Century.  We conclude with a final section on Europe during and after the Cold War, surveying the ruins of the twentieth century from the vantage point of a post-communist, post-fascist, post-colonial and (one hopes) post-genocidal present.

    Partial Reading List (subject to change):

    Aimé Césaire, Discourse on Colonialism

    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

    Roger Griffin ed., Fascism (Oxford)

    G. E. Lessing, Nathan the Wise

    Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

    Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, The Communist Manifesto

    Voltaire, Candide 

  • Hist 180g: The Middle East

    Rouighi

    Tuesday/Thursday

    11:00a-12:20p

    Course Description:

    This course is an introduction to major themes in Middle East history. It allows students to form a general conceptual map that would allow them to recognize the most salient features of the peoples of the regions and their histories. Camels, flying carpets, and genies right next to oil monarchs, dictators, and militants. This professor will hand out candy in class.

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    Glenn

    Monday/Wednesday

    12:00-1:50p

    Course Description:

    Although it comes in perhaps as many versions as instructors who teach it, History 300 typically aims to offer students a somewhat systematic overview of a range of approaches to the study of the past, that is, to the discipline of History.  This version of the course has no such ambitions.  Instead, it consists of a hodge-podge of exercises and undertakings designed to raise questions and problems of the sort historians must consider in their reflection on the past and in their research and writing about it. 

    There are four essential, if seemingly distinct, elements of this course; some of them will be interwoven over the course of the term; others will stand alone with no obvious connection to the others. 

    1.  Over the course of the term, students shall create a personal archive of their own writing and documents related to — and which relate — their lives and experiences.  These archives will ultimately be combined so as to create a body of material, a class archive, that students will then use to write a term paper about some aspect of our world.  This paper will be informed by the types of historical questions and methodological considerations we develop over the course of the term and based exclusively on the class’s archival materials that we have at our disposal.

    2.  We shall also read a series of seminal essays written by scholars and watch a handful of films.  In different ways, these essays and films will articulate and illustrate some of the fundamental problems and questions with which historians have struggled in the modern study of the past.  They will also inform our creation and analysis of the personal and class archives.

    3.  In an effort to learn how to read current scholarship and frame historical questions, we shall read together one (as yet to be determined) monographs.

    4.  Each student will study the work of one faculty member of the history department.  Indeed, students can choose any scholar whose work they wish to read, read one of their books, analyze their approaches to their topic and the ways they’ve chosen to present their findings.  Students will each offer a short presentation in class about the historian and, ultimately, a brief written review of the work in comparison to one of the monographs from no. 3, above.   Of course, like every other piece of writing students do, this review will be included in the student’s personal and thus the class archive.

    Perhaps it goes without saying that this is a demanding course.  Students will be expected to write regularly and in various genres.  They will be expected to read carefully one another’s writing.  And it is my expectation that all students come to all class meetings and that everyone is prepared for class discussion and participates actively in it.

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History- Be Your Own Historian: Learn Through Practice

    Sheehan

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

    Evaluating both primary and secondary sources lies at the heart of historical methodology.  Each week we will discuss a different kind of source and through a series of assignments students will learn how to use these different kinds of sources in historical inquiry.  The idea is to practice the skills of history.  How do you read a scholarly article?  How do you find one?  What’s a monograph?  How can we use objects of material culture as primary sources?  What are the pitfalls of oral history?  This class will help you answer these and many more questions by giving you an opportunity to practice the methods yourself.

    Over the course of the semester, among other assignments students will write biographies of their classmates, take an oral history, and revise and publish a Wikipedia article on history.

    Reading: (available at University Book Store)

    James West Davidson and Mark Hamilton Lytle, After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection, McGraw Hill, 2009 ISBN 978-0073385488. You need to have the sixth edition.

    Readings available from the library

    Roger Dingman, “Atomic Diplomacy during the Korean War,” International Security, 13:3 (Winter 1988-1989), 50-91. (Available in JSTOR)

    Philippa Levine, “States of Undress: Nakedness and the Colonial Imagination” Victorian Studies, 50:2 (Winter 2008), 189-219).  (Available in Project Muse)

    Joseph W. Esherick, “Cherishing Sources from Afar,” Modern China Vol. 24, No. 2 (April 1998), pp. 135-161. (Available in JSTOR)

    James L. Hevia, “Postpolemical Historiography: A Response to Joseph W. Esherick,” Modern China Vol 24, No. 3 (July 1998), 319-327. (Available in JSTOR)

    Joseph W. Esherick, “Tradutore, Traditore: A Reply to James Hevia,” Modern China Vol 24, No. 3 (July 1998), 328-332. (Available in JSTOR)

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    O'Neill

    Tuesday/Thursday

    10:00-11:50a

    Course Description:

    It has been said, “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” In this course we will think about history as a foreign country, as an unknown and sometimes confusing place and then we will seek to understand it. We will examine how history became an academic discipline, how historians themselves attempt to understand the past and we will explore what happens when the past is appropriated by the present. We begin by looking at the history of history before moving onto the tools of the historian. Next we examine how different historians have inspected the same topic, in this case the Salem Witchcraft Trials, and what the implications of those viewpoints are. Finally we consider the relationship between the past and the present to grapple both with the role of history in the present and the place of the historian. The goal of this course is to teach students to become historians, but also to cause them to think critically about how histories are made and used.

    Readings:

    John H. Arnold, History: A Very Short Introduction

    Dickinson, Henry E. Huntington’s Library of Libraries [selections] BB

    Roy Rosenzweig, “Can History Be Open Source?: Wikipedia and the Future of the Past, The Journal of American History (2006) 93 (1): 117-146

    Roy Rosenzweig, “The Road to Xanadu: Public and Private Pathways on the History Web,” The Journal of American History (2001) 88 (2): 548-579

    Paul Boyer & Stephen Nissenbaum, Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft

    Carol Karlsen, The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

    Mary Beth Norton, In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

    John Demos, The Enemy Within: 2,000 Years of Witch-hunting in the Western World

    Gretchen Adams, The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials

    Arthur Miller, The Crucible.

    Tony Horowitz, Confederates in the Attic

  • Hist 265g: Understanding Race and Sex Historically

    Williams

    Tuesday/Thursday

    9:30-10:50a

    Course Description:

    This course considers how and for what purpose different entities have linked—or failed to link—constructions and categories of race and sex.  It demonstrates how ideas around race and sexuality—issues we still tend to take for granted as fixed in nature—are historically constructed, often in relation to each other.  We will explore influential case studies concerning slavery, immigration law, marriage, the idea of family, sexual coercion, the body, and popular uses of science.  The larger focus is U.S. history from the 1850s through the present.

  • Hist 266g: Business and East Asian Culture, 1800-Present

    Sheehan

    Tuesday/Thursday

    11:00a-12:20p

    Course Description:

    How do we account for the economic rise of the West in the period since 1800 (perhaps 1500?) and the subsequent economic rise of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore)?  In order to answer that question, this class argues that we need to think about business and its links with economics on the one hand and politics, culture, and society on the other.

    This course will challenge students to link the history of the corporation and other forms of business organization in East Asia to broad narratives of cultural, social, economic, and political change.  Students will use case studies of various industries and business enterprises as their primary source of inspiration and then link these cases back to their cultural, social, economic and political context in discussion and writing.

    We will focus on three themes:

    1)       East Asian Business Model.  Is there an “East Asian Model” for successful (profitable and / or competitive) business behaviors?  Or, is there a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean model?

    2)       East Asian Economic Model.  Is there an East Asian model for a successful (growth-promoting) business environment and how does it differ from the West?  Or is there a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean model?  How do businesses respond to their environments?

    3)       Business and Its Context.  How can the study of business show the ways in which economics are related to culture, politics, and society?

    Course Methodology: Reading Cases

    Each week students will read one or more case studies about business or economic activities.  Many of these cases are drawn from the Harvard Business School Case Book.  These cases will provide the basis for discussions and papers.

  • Hist 309: Britain and Ireland, 1100-1500 C.E.

    Bitel

    Tuesday/Thursday

    11:00a-12:20p

    Course Description:

    This course will use history, literature, and archaeology to analyze relations between England and Ireland during the continuing expansion of the Norman-English kingdom, the colonization of Ireland, and the subsequent development toward the English nation-state.  Students will read primary and secondary historical texts along with theories of European colonization; they will also learn to interpret visual evidence such as architecture, landscapes, and art to study the history of the two islands. 

    Topics covered include medieval colonialism; military expansion and attempts at political centralization; landscape, settlement, and castle-building; development of interlinked economies, forms of political and cultural resistance; family life; gender relations; court culture; and changing Christianities.  Format is a mix of informal lectures and seminar-style discussion of readings.

  • Hist 327: Twentieth-Century Britain

    O'Neill

    Tuesday/Thursday

    2:00-3:20p

    Course Description:

    Through the course of the twentieth century, Britain went from having an empire upon which the sun never set to being reduced almost to the size of Shakespeare’s “blessed plot.” Yet, Britain in 2000 was obviously not Shakespeare’s England and the twentieth century left indelible marks – the “lost generation” of World War I, Churchill and the Blitz, the growth of the welfare state and the loss of empire. The century was one of vast change and, if not decline, than of reconfiguration. The twentieth century forced the British to reconceptualize the place of the state in their lives and the place of their country in the world. In this course we will try to figure out why these changes occurred, how the British dealt with them, and what they say about Britain’s future. To do so we will focus upon Britain’s relationship with the rest of the world, upon the economic, social and psychological consequences of two world wars, upon the British people’s ideas about class and the growth of the welfare state and finally upon Britons’ conception of themselves and their own history.

    Books & Films:

    George Bernard Shaw, John Bull’s Other Island

    John Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps

    Vera Brittain, Testament of Youth

    George Orwell, The Orwell Reader

    Evelyn Waugh, Put Out More Flags

    Samuel Selvon, The Lonely Londoners

    Julian Barnes, England, England

    Mrs. Miniver (1942)

    The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

    Look Back in Anger (1958)

    Seven-Up (1964)

    28-Up (1984)

    The Filth & the Fury: A Sex Pistols Film (2000)

    The Queen (2006)

  • Hist 333: Korea: The Modern Transformation

    Hwang

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:
    This course explores the major events and themes of modern Korean history from the end of the 19th century to the present day.  Our course will focus on the five specific topics listed below.  The challenge for us will be to compare the different narratives and perspectives on the theme and its related issues.  These accounts come from separate historical narratives, popular contemporary films, and primary source documents from the period in question. 

    How these varying accounts contribute to the construction of a larger picture of that week’s theme or topic will be our ultimate concern, and your personal interpretation of the meanings derived from our sources will be the basis of a weekly 2-page response paper.  Furthermore, each student will give two 20-minute presentations that will serve as a springboard for discussion, one individually and another in tandem with another student.  

    Topics:
    National Identity and Foreign Influence at the Dawn of the Modern Era
    Women and Modernity in the Colonial Period
    Social Conflict in the Liberation and Korean War Periods, 1945-53
    South Korea: Dictatorship, Development, and Democratization
    North Korea and Inter-Korean Relations

  • Hist 334: History of the Samurai

    Piggott

    Monday/Wednesday

    12:00-1:50p

    Course Description:

    The samurai has played a pivotal role in Japan’s history, and in this course we will explore the emergence and changing functions of the warrior at various historical moments. We will also consider the character of samurai-centered government, society, and culture up to early modern times. The roles of women, family, and religion will all be included, and we will take up issues of comparison: how is the warrior in Japan different from warriors in China and elsewhere, and with what historical effects?

    This is “a hands-­‐on” course in which analysis of primary sources and writing about your interpretations are emphasized. An introductory course in Japanese history is highly recommended.

  • Hist 336: History of Japan, 1550-1945

    Godart

    Tuesday

    3:30-6:20p

    Course Description:

    In this course, you will study how Japan became a modern nation. This story takes us from the age of warring samurai to the end of the Japanese Empire in 1945. This trajectory can be divided into two large periods. During the Tokugawa period (1603-1867), Japan was ruled by the samurai class, divided into domains, and largely at peace with its neighbors. In the Imperial period (1868-1945), Japan became a nation state unified under the Emperor, embarked on a rapid modernization, became a regional superpower, engaged in a series of wars, and created a colonial empire. The main aim of this course will be to understand the changes and continuities between these two periods. A major theme that will run through the course will be how notions of national identity are subject to historical change, and in Japan’s case through changing relations with both Asia and the West. We will see in detail how a unified “Japanese” identity was constructed in the process of the creation of a modern nation state.

    What you will learn:

    • Master the grand outline of Japan’s modern history
    • Understand how Japan’s contemporary situation is a product of its modern history
    • Analyze and evaluate primary sources and images, and place them in their historical context
    • Articulate and discuss historical arguments and ideas, through in class discussion and writing
  • Hist 346: American Intellectual History

    Fox

    Monday/Wednesday

    12:00-1:50p

    Course Description:

    This course will introduce you to the field of “intellectual history”—traditionally “the history of ideas,” and more recently the history of thinkers and writers across the social spectrum.  We will read some classic works in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American thought and analyze some classic films in American thought.  Among the authors:  Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Henry David Thoreau, Abraham Lincoln, Edward Bellamy, Jane Addams, Martin Luther King, Barry Goldwater, Toni Morrison, and Barack Obama.  Among the films:  Birth of a Nation, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, The Grapes of Wrath, and Casablanca.  Special attention to major themes in social, political, and religious thought.

  • Hist 361: 20th Century U.S. History

    Ethington

    Tuesday/Thursday

    12:30-1:50p

    Course Description:

    For United States, the 20th century was an Augustan Age, comparable to the consolidation of the Roman Empire under Caesar Augustus. Although the U.S. case was very different, it underwent a transformation no less dramatic, from a republic to an empire, from an agrarian nation to an industrial giant. Indeed, the United States briefly enjoyed the status of the most powerful nation in all of human history, whose economy has ruled the world for generations.

    This course is about the social, political, cultural, and economic transformations of the United States during this period. We will examine the contributions to that massive transformation made by millions of ordinary people, by institutions of civil society and of the state, by large socioeconomic classes and race-ethnic groups, by narrow strata of intellectuals and artists, and by very small sets of political rulers, like the one quoted above.

    The stakes have always been extremely high in the stories we will examine. Nothing less than human freedom was at stake in the Civil Rights movement. In the last year alone, millions of Americans have lost their life savings, their jobs, or their homes in the worst economic crisis since the 1930s. The United States just elected its first African American president, but the nation, fighting two major wars, is embroiled in unstable regional conflicts and stands accused of human rights violations during its so-called “War on Terror.” The list could go on, but the point of these examples is that the history we will be studying carries enormous weight. The questions we will ask are not just “academic.” Life and death, human emancipation, justice, prosperity, opportunity, “progress,” and may other vital outcomes rest on our actions, which are guided by our understanding of our past.

  • Hist 365: The Second World War

    Godart

    Thursday

    3:00-5:50p

    Course Description:

    The Second World War defined the Twentieth Century and in many ways the world we live in today. But as time goes by, we are still struggling to understand what brought the world into an unprecedented orgy of violence, a wholesale rejection of democracy, liberalism, and internationalism, while also producing new bonds, ideas, and utopian dreams. While you probably know already quite a lot about this conflict, it is still surprisingly difficult to gain a truly global and balanced grasp. What we know is often skewed through the lenses in the nations we grow up in. Did you know that both Romania and Hungary suffered more combat casualties than the United States? That 90% of German casualties fell while fighting, not Britain or America, but the Soviet Union? That 3 million Indians, 2 million Vietnamese, and even more Chinese and Ukrainians died from hunger? That for many people conflict continued after 1945? 

    Objectives: by the end of this class, you will:

    •  Understand the big picture, causes and different aspects of the war in the Asia Pacific region and Europe, and how they related to each other.
    •  Know how and why WW2 shaped the Twentieth Century.
    •  Experiment with balancing different aspects in historical explanation of war, including political, strategic, economical, cultural, ideological, and psychological aspects.
    •  Gain a grasp of current discussions in studies on the Second World War.
    •  Delve into some much less known, but significant stories of the war.
  • Hist 366: The People's Republic of China

    Goldstein

    Tuesday/Thursday

    9:30-10:50a

    Course Description:

    Politics, economy, society, and culture from 1949 to the present including the role of the communist party and the experiences of ordinary people.

  • Hist 369: Aztecs, Mayas, and other Indigenous Peoples of the Americas

    Martinez

    Tuesday/Thursday

    9:30-10:50a

    Course Description:

    This course offers an introduction to Mesoamerican and Andean civilizations during the pre-Columbian and early colonial periods. It will strongly focus on the Mexica (Aztec), Maya, and Inca cultures, but will also include readings on other indigenous cultures. The course will have three main objectives. First, it will examine political, economic, religious, and social aspects of pre-Columbian civilizations; second, it will discuss the causes and consequences of the Spanish conquest; and third, it will provide an overview of the establishment of colonial societies. Special attention will be paid to indigenous and “mestizo” historians (Chimalpahin, Guaman Poma, Ixtilxóchitl, Tezózomoc, “The Inca” Garcilaso de la Vega, etc.), their lives, and their production of histories of pre-Columbian states.

  • Hist 374: History of Mexico

    Becker

    Monday/Wednesday

    10:00-11:50a

    Course Description:

    This course graces the most important people and events of Mexico's long history.  It begins before the sixteenth century Spanish conquest and follows multiple indigenous, European, and ethnically mixed women and men into the contemporary period.  In particular, it understands Mexico and Mexicans role in the construction of capitalism,

    in vast resistance movements, in Mexico's great 1910 revolution.  There is considerable focus on the forms in which ordinary people transformed their lives, and thus the world; there is also much emphasis on literary and artistic Mexico.

  • Hist 432: Britain in the 18th Century

    O'Neill

    Monday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

    The British spent much of the eighteenth century trying to figure out what it meant to be British. When the eighteenth century dawned the term the British Isles designated a group of islands off the coast of the European Continent, by the end of the century these islands, whether their inhabitants liked it or not, were part of one united political entity with a growing empire attached to it. They also went from being one of the most politically radical states in Europe to being an emblem of stability and conservatism. But the very fabric of people’s lives changed as well as consumerism grew, the nation became more industrialized and as expectations of social position altered. This class explores how this happened, how people thought about it, and what it was like to live within it. It examines the fraught relations between England, Scotland, and Ireland, the growing power of the state, the lives and growing expectations of all citizens, the emergence of Britain as a trading and industrial power, and the strains placed upon it by the revolutions that shook America, the Continent, and Britain itself at the end of the century. It was this crucible of war, upheaval, and wealth that created the state known as Britain. The assignments for this class can be tailored to help you use it to prepare for a senior thesis if so desired.

    Readings:

    Steven Pincus, ed. England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-89

    Linda Colley, Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707-1837

    John Brewer, The Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688-1783

    Erin Mackie, ed. The Commerce of Everyday Life: Selections from The Tatler & The Spectator

    Amanda Vickery, Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England

    Tim Hitchcock, Down and Out in 18th Century London

    D. Hay, “Property, Authority & the Criminal Law,” Albion’s Fatal Tree

    Randy Sparks, The Two Princes of Calabar: An Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Odyssey

    Maya Jasanoff, The Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture and Conquest in the East, 1750-1850

    Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man

    Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

     

  • Hist 440: Early Modern World History

    Hwang

    Wednesday

    3:00-5:50p

    Course Description:

    Designed for students preparing for careers in teaching, as well as for graduates and advanced undergraduates studying history, international relations, political science, and other fields, this course explores issues and themes surrounding the history of the world from about 1450 to 1850, the period commonly called the “early modern” era. 

    The challenge for us is to frame the myriad events and developments of this period into a coherent understanding of larger patterns.  Hence this course is not simply an introductory survey of “what happened,” although an overview is provided in the first few weeks.  Rather, this course demands that each student carefully consider the balance of various historical forces to arrive at an informed understanding of what happened, how it happened, and why it matters.

    The course will be centered on the close reading of six books, each demanding the same set of analytical inquiries:  What is the central theme(s) that the author wishes to establish in the book?  How does she go about doing this?  Your ability to analyze, interpret, and understand each book, and to express this understanding both verbally and in writing, will determine your course performance.  You will write three essays, each comparing a set of two books, which will constitute the bulk of your grade.  Our class meetings will also incorporate short lectures and presentations, film viewings, and other activities, but we will spend most of the time in discussion.

     

  • Hist 444: Mass Violence and Comparative Genocide in Modern World History

    Gruner

    Tuesday/Thursday

    2:00-3:20p

    Course Description:

    Systematic mass murder of large populations is one of the main features of Modern world history. Thus, this seminar will methodically explore and compare the origins, developments and forms of mass violence and genocide, focusing especially on the dark 20th century. Using both primary and secondary sources we will start with the study of the mass murder of indigenous people in different parts of the world from the 16th until the early 20th century (Colonial genocides form the Spanish conquest of the Americas until the massacres of the Herero in South West Africa by the Germans). The main focus lies on the exploration of the genocide of Armenians and other Christians in Turkey during World War I, the Holocaust against the Jews and the genocides in Cambodia and Ruanda.

    For comparative reasons the genocides following the partition of India and Pakistan as well as in Bangladesh and Guatemala are included, In contrast to common approaches, we will especially investigate the preconditions and early stages of persecution to discuss the transition to mass murder. For this purpose, we will also discuss case studies from Africa and the Americas, where groups were fiercely discriminated against without being exterminated.

    Analyzing these cases and others, we will compare the factors which motivated states and groups throughout history to instigate mass murder as well as people to participate in these mass crimes. We will trace the history of the public discussion about Genocides and dig into the still vital debate about an appropriate definition of mass extermination.

    Required Reading:

    Donald Bloxham: The Great Game of Genocide: Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians, New York: Oxford University Press 2007 (Paperback)

    Ben Kiernan: The Pol Pot regime, Race, Power and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge 1975-1979, New Haven et.al: Yale University Press 2008 (Paperback).

    Wolf Gruner, Jewish Forced Labor under the Nazis: Economic Needs and Racial Aims, 1938-1944, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008 (Paperback)

    Scott Strauss: The Order of Genocide: Race, Power, and War in Rwanda, Harlow et.al: Pearson Longman (Paperback 2006).

    Etelle HigonnetQuiet Genocide: Guatemala 1981-1983, New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers (2008) (Hardcover).

    Nancy L. Clark and William H. WorgerSouth Africa: The Rise and Fall of Apartheid, Ithaca: Cornell UP (Paperback 2004)

    Required articles and book chapters are posted on Blackboard

     

  • Hist 454: The World Pirates Made: Piracy and Privateering, 1500-1815

    Perl-Rosenthal

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

    This course is a research seminar in the history of piracy and privateering in the early modern Atlantic world.  These two forms of commerce raiding, though they seem exotic and foreign to the modern eye, were among the most important forces that shaped the developing modernity of the Atlantic world.  Piracy and privateering were big business; they were instrumental in defining the legal boundaries of empire; they were a frequent casus belli among states; and they permeated the popular imagination.  In this course, students will use one of three digital databases of primary sources as a basis for research projects on the history of piracy and the rise of the modern world.

    The course is intended for advanced undergraduates; History 300 is recommended but not required.  It gives students the opportunity to undertake a substantial, independent historical research project using original sources and employing the latest research tools.  The final project will be excellent preparation for the senior thesis, or for some may serve as a capstone project in its own right.

    Class meetings are structured around three types of activities: discussions of secondary literature; workshops of student writing; and “practicum” sessions, in which students will gain hands-on experience in using research tools and conducting independent research in primary sources.  Students build up to the final project through a series of small assignments that train them in research methods and provide opportunities for instructor and peer feedback and support.  Students will regularly workshop their written work with one another.

     

  • Hist 455: Advanced Topics in African-American History

    Williams

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:


    This course, subtitled Race and Reconstruction, focuses on major legal and political developments concerning race and citizenship rights that occurred during and after the Civil War.  Although we will touch on military and paramilitary engagements that occurred before and after the war’s official end, this is not principally a course in military history.  Enrollment limited to 15 students and by permission of the instructor.

  • Hist 465: America in the Cold War World, 1945-1991

    Westwick

    Monday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

     

    This course will examine the Cold War U.S. through the particular lens of Southern California.  The local aerospace industry put Southern California on the front lines of the Cold War.  We will consider how the technologies built by Southern Californians shaped the Cold War, and how the Cold War shaped Southern California's society and culture.  We will examine the history of labor; gender and ethnicity; politics and anticommunism; secrecy and classification; intellectual and popular culture (from architecture, literature, and design to hot rods and surfing); and the environment.  In addition to the potential readings below, students will use archival documents and oral histories from the Huntington Library's aerospace collections.    

    Readings will be drawn from the following:

    David Beers, Blue Sky Dream: A Memoir of America's Fall From Grace

    Joan Didion, Where I Was From

    M.G. Lord, Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science

    D.J. Waldie, Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir

    Jon Weiner, How We Forgot the Cold War

    Peter Westwick, ed., Blue Sky Metropolis: The Aerospace Century in Southern California

    Becky Nicolaides, My Blue Heaven: Life and Politics in the Working-Class Suburbs of Los Angeles, 1920-1965

  • Hist 473: Colonial Latin America Seminar

    Becker

    Wednesday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

     

    This seminar focuses on the relationships between Aztecs, Mayans, Incas, blacks, and Europeans from before the sixteenth century through nineteenth century Latin American independence.

    Students will be invited to enter complex and enthralling historical worlds from the perspectives of multiple colonial Latin Americans, to consider the ways that

    indigenous people deeply transformed Spanish imperialism and thus colonial Latin America.  Considerable attention will be paid to Latin American racial, ethnic, and gender relations.

  • Hist 474: Sex, Gender, and Colonialism in Latin America, 1492-1820

    Martinez

    Tuesday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

     

    This course offers a review of the historical literature on women in colonial Latin America as well as a close reading of a growing body of works, in history and literature, using gender as a category of analysis. While many of the readings concentrate on Mexico and Peru, the two principal seats of the Spanish empire in the Americas, the course includes works from various other areas of Spanish America and from other colonial situations. Some background in colonial Latin American history is desirable, but not required.

    Readings include Susan Schroeder, Stephanie Wood, and Robert Haskett (eds.), Indian Women of Early Mexico; Susan Socolow; The Women of Colonial Latin America; Steve Stern’s The Secret History of Gender: Women, Men, and Power in Late Colonial Mexico; Catalina de Erauso, Memoir of a Basque Lieutenant Nun Transvestite in the New World; and Jean Franco, Plotting Women: Gender and Representation in Mexico. 

    Classes will consist mainly of discussions. Students will therefore be expected to complete all assigned readings before class and to contribute to discussions. Requirements will include a short midterm paper, regular in-class writing assignments, and an 8-10 page final paper.

  • Hist 478: The United States, 1789-1850

    Halttunen

    Monday/Wednesday

    10:00-11:50a

    Course Description:

     

    This course covers the history of the United States from the inauguration of George Washington in 1789 through the Compromise of 1850.  We will be exploring the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States during this crucial 60-year period of early nation-building. 

    A major theme of the course will be historical contingencies, in three major areas:

    1)       First, how were the nation’s geographical boundaries established through a series of conflicts with indigenous nations and competing imperial powers?

    2)       Second, how was the body of American citizenry formed through acts of inclusion and exclusion which clarified which sorts of people qualified as “American” and which did not? 

    3)       And third, how was the balance of power between the separate states and the national government under federalism contested and negotiated, especially with respect to the issue of slavery? 

    Though historians often treat “nation-building” as an inevitable process during this period, the American nation was a highly contingent and often fragile project in the early national period.  In History 478, we will be exploring not only the American nation that did take shape between 1789 and 1850, but also the alternative American nations that might have emerged in its place.

    Assigned books:

    Gunther Barth, ed., The Lewis and Clark Expedition

    Colin G. Calloway, The Shawnees and the War for America

    Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, 1817-1862

    Thomas Dublin, ed. Farm to Factory: Women’s Letters, 1830-1860

    Harry Watson, ed., Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay: Democracy and Development in Antebellum                  America

    Joshua D. Rothman, ed., Reforming America, 1815-1860

    James W. Cook, ed., The Colossal P. T. Barnum Reader: Nothing Else Like It in the Universe

    Anthony E. Kaye, Joining Places: Slave Neighborhoods in the Old South

    Paul Finkelman, ed., Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South

    Malcolm J. Rohrbough, Days of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the American Nation

    William Dusinberre, Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk

  • Hist 480: Seminar in Middle East History

    Gualtieri

    Friday

    1:00-3:50a

    Course Description:

    A readings and research seminar dealing with one topic in the history of the Middle East. Topics for Fall 2013 are Feminism and Nationalism in the Middle East.

  • Hist 492: Honors Thesis

    Lerner

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:

    This course is designed to provide a capstone experience in history, assisting each student in completing his or her honors thesis as part of the requirements for receiving honors in the history department. 

    We will focus on the practical steps towards this objective, and will thus spend a good deal of class time reading and engaging with your drafts.  The goal is to create a supportive community within which we can all work to improve writing, increase analytical rigor and resolve problems.

    Requirements for acceptance to the History Department Honors Program. 

    • 3.5 History GPA

    • B+ or higher in HIST300

    • Completion of at least one 400-level seminar in area of concentration

    • Approval of Faculty Thesis Advisor

     

  • Hist 498: History of Science and Technology

    Shindell

    Thursday

    2:00-4:50p

    Course Description:


    This course explores the dynamic relationship between science, technology, and culture during the Cold War, primarily in the American context. From the growth of universities, to the creation of new disciplines, to attempts to reshape the world and the societies that inhabit it, students will explore the interconnectedness of the knowledge we make with the way we live. Students will also be asked to determine to what extent the Cold War can be considered a unique period for science and technology, their development and their perceived importance, and what legacies of the Cold War world have survived in the post-Cold War period. Scientific and technological topics will be discussed in class, but only basic scientific literacy is required in order to succeed in this course. The emphasis of the course will be on the social and cultural significance of these developments.

  • Hist 498: Historical Fictions: Race, Nation, and Religion

    Rouighi

    Tuesday/Thursday

    2:00-3:20p

    Course Description:


    This course is based on the movie The Matrix. It gives students a blue and a red pill and then takes them through an adventure. It is a trip in historical methodology designed for students with specially colored glasses. There will be a lot of reading, some of it demanding, but students should wake up at the end of the semester rather pleased with themselves for having taken the right pill or for no reason at all. The course also prepares students for the reality that the sequels are not going to be as good as the first one.


  • Department of History
  • 3502 Trousdale Parkway
  • Social Sciences Building (SOS) 153
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 90089-0034