Spring 2016 Courses

  • Hist 100gm: The American Experience
    Block

    M / W / F

    11:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    Welcome to HIST 100, The American Experience. The course will follow the history of North America from prehistory through the present (emphasizing the period roughly 1492-1960). You will learn to situate contemporary American society in a broad historical context and to think critically about the past and its relationship to the present, while becoming acquainted with the most significant analytic methods by which we attempt to understand the meaning of history. The course will introduce you to historical narratives of the American past, analytic thinking about the past, and the types of research skills used by historians to learn about the past.

     

  • Hist 102gm: Medieval People: Early Europe and its Neighbors, 400-1500

    Glenn

    T / Th

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    There is a great diversity in the peoples who shaped the social, political, religious, and intellectual landscapes of European lands from the fourth through the fourteenth century. In this course, we shall study them. In particular, we shall explore the works of a number of individuals from four (distinct?) periods in the hope that, by getting to know them (both the works and their authors), we can learn about the various groups to which they belonged and the cultures from which they come. In other words, our rigorous study of primary sources of various genres — narrative histories, biographies, laws, theological treatises, philosophical tracts, poems, letters, literature, and the visual remains of the period — will enable us to glimpse at least some of the norms and institutions of the different peoples who populated Europe during the period generally known as the Middle Ages. We shall attempt to determine what some of these norms and institutions are and their similarities and/or differences across time and place as we visit the Late Antique World of the fourth century, the Barbarian West of sixth through eighth centuries, the Age of Cathedrals and Chivalry in twelfth-century northern France, and Late Medieval Italy (thirteenth- and fourteenth- centuries). What do these cultures share? our authors? their works? How are they alike? And how do they differ? From the sources, students are encouraged — indeed, really required — to develop their own answers to these questions over the course of the semester. Lectures will, at times, supplement our readings, but much of class time will be devoted to discussion of the sources as we analyze what they can (and cannot) tell us about their authors, about the cultures in which they lived, and about the pasts (real or imagined) out of which their cultures and Europe grew.

  • Hist 105g: The Korean Past

    Hwang

    T / Th

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    A survey of Korean history from the beginning to most recent times, with a focus on recurring historical themes, comparison and interpretation of narratives, and analysis of primary sources.  In addition to class participation, assignments include a short weekly paper, an in-class midterm examination, and an online final examination.  

     

    Course texts: KM Hwang, A History of Korea (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2010; also available as an ebook); and Lee Injae et al, Korean History in Maps: From Prehistory to the Twenty-First Century (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014).

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    Block

    M / W

    8:30-9:50am

    Course Description:

    Methods and theories of historical interpretation of evidence; uses of archives; modes of presenting the past to the public. Required of all History majors. Duplicates credit in former HIST 300.

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History - Historians, Knowledge, Public Memory and Nation

    Becker

     T/ Th

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Precisely because history should be understood, as a prominent scholar once put it, as “everything that ever happened to everybody,” this course focuses on the vast array of temporal experiences, the thoughts, feelings, gestures, rituals, ceremonies, scholars concerned about past, present and future have created out of the fragmentary remains our predecessors have bequeathed to us.  And precisely because an array of scholars and artists have approached history in multiple, even kaleidoscopic ways, this course invites students to assess traditional historical approaches to history, innovative approaches to history, fictional approaches to history, oral historical approaches to history and poetic approaches to some of the rawest moments in contemporary history.  Students will be encouraged through critical and creative analysis to consider and to develop a thoughtful, engaging approach to the studies of change over time. 

     

  • Hist 201: Approaches to History

    O'Neill

    M / W / F

    10:00-10:50am

    Course Description:

    It has been said, “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” In this course we will think about history as a foreign country, as an unknown and sometimes confusing place and then we will seek to understand it. We will examine how history became an academic discipline, how historians themselves attempt to understand the past and we will explore what happens when the past is appropriated by the present. We begin by looking at the history of history before moving onto the tools of the historian. Next we examine how different historians have inspected the same topic, in this case the Salem Witchcraft Trials, and what the implications of those viewpoints are. Finally we consider the relationship between the past and the present to grapple both with the role of history in the present and the place of the historian. The goal of this course is to teach students to become historians, but also to cause them to think critically about how histories are made and used.

     

  • Hist 220: Murder on Trial in America

    Halttunen

    T / Th

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    This course examines high-profile murders and murder trials in American history from the colonial period to the present, in order to explore the major social, political, and cultural issues illuminated by flashpoint murders and the resulting trials.  (Flashpoint: A place, event, or time at which trouble, such as violence or anger, flares up.)  Cases to be covered include the colonial murder of the Indian John Sassamon that triggered King Philip’s War, the assassination of Lincoln and its impact on Reconstruction, the Sacco and Vanzetti case that focused national anxieties about immigration and the Red Scare, and the lynching of Emmett Till that helped fuel the civil rights movement.  While offering a thematic overview of four centuries of American history, this course focuses on the ways that crimes of murder and legal responses to them have both expressed and shaped major social and political crises in the nation’s history. (Please note: A few of the crimes studied here did not involve murder trials; in those cases, other arenas for reaction to the crime will be explored.)

     

    History 220 provides an introduction to the Law, History, and Culture major, as well as an addition to the History Department’s lower-division offerings in American history. 

    Learning objectives

    Students in History 220 will learn how to understand historical events and processes through the analysis of primary sources (the raw evidence of the past); assess the conflicting interpretations advanced by previous historians (secondary sources); and craft their own interpretations by drawing on both primary and secondary sources.  They will improve their abilities to express their own ideas and interpretations effectively through discussion, debate, and written work.  Students will also explore the significance of past developments for present-day concerns—while at the same time respecting the pastness of the past, and the critical importance of different contexts and worldviews in shaping different historical choices and outcomes.

     

    With reference to the specific subject of History 220, students will come to understand prominent crimes of murder not simply as isolated acts of human evil, but as reflections and flashpoints for larger crises—social, political, economic, cultural—faced by Americans across four centuries.  They will also learn to analyze the ways that criminal trials and punishments attempted—sometimes successfully, often not—to use the law to resolve those crises.  They will acquire new understanding of such major issues as race and gender, the nature of democratic political authority, industrialization and class conflict, immigration and nativism, cultural dissent, and the problem of political polarization.

  • Hist 225g: Film, Power, and American Society

    Ross

    M / W

    10:00-11:50pm

    Course Description:

    This course analyzes the nature of power in the United States—as exercised from above and below—and how it operated to shape the course of American history from the 1890s to the present. We will examine many of the fundamental social, political, and economic problems that have shaped the 20th and 21st centuries: industrialization, urbanization, war, poverty, crime, politics, success, race, class, and gender conflict.  Using methodologies drawn from history and cinema studies, we will learn how to navigate among three different types of sources that inform our knowledge of how human behavior has shaped the economic, political, cultural and social landscape: (a) primary documents that shed light on those issues and behaviors; (b) secondary sources (historical overviews) that assess those issues; (c) films made during the period that address those issues.

     

    A note on our use of film as an analytic tool: Few contemporary institutions have a greater effect on molding popular understandings of the world than film and television.  Yet, most citizens lack the critical tools to contextualize, analyze, and critique the images and ideologies conveyed on the screen.  This course is designed to join elements of film studies with various schools of historical analysis to provide students with the critical skills needed to analyze the images and ideologies they see on the screen and to understand how those images effect our views of the past and present.

     

     Our films and documents cover the period from 1900 to 2010. We only watch films (which include fiction films, documentaries, and newsreels)that were made during that decade and deal with one or more of the major problems of the time.  In this way, these films serve as another primary source. But movies offer only one perspective on the world.  Each week will also read and analyze works that offer additional perspectives: readings that discuss the general historical events of the era; readings that offer primary documents which shed light on how people of the time saw their world and sought to change it; and readings that discuss what is happening in the motion picture industry and how that, in turn, effected the politics American film. In short, we will triangulate our way through American history using different methodological and source approaches to understanding the past, the present, and the possibilities for the future.  It is the student's job to figure out which of these perspectives seem most convincing, why it seems so, and the implications of one form of knowledge being more powerful than another.

     

  • Hist 240g: History of California
    Logan

    M / W/ F

    10:00-10:50am

    Course Description:

    A thematic approach to California history from precontact to present; focus on peoples, environment, economic, social, and cultural development, politics, and rise to global influence.

    • General Education: This course satisfies the university's general education requirement.
    • Note: Explore the history of California at the intersection of history, law, and culture and the roles of local, state, and federal law in shaping California over time.
  • Hist 266g: Business and East Asian Culture, 1800-Present
    Sheehan

    T / Th

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    In the last two hundred years, the success of East Asian (China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore) businesses has been described alternatively as dismal and a miracle.  Attempts to understand both the failures and successes of East Asian business have often turned to culture as an explanatory device.  Explanations which saw nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century East Asia as bound within a Confucian straight jacket have given way to explanations of the power of “Confucian Capitalism,” though the latter became synonymous with “crony capitalism” during Japanese stagnation of the 1990s and the Asian financial crisis of 1997.  Others in search of an explanation have looked at family structure, religion, population demographics, inter-Asian migration, the ingrained cultural work ethic, a spirit of innovation, imperial culture . . . the list goes on.

     

    This course will use specific cases (most drawn from the Harvard Business School Case Book) to challenge students to link the history of the corporation and other forms of business organization in East Asia to broad narratives of cultural, social, and political change and continuity.  At the same time, it will help students develop critical thinking and learn how to make evidence-driven arguments.

     

  • Hist 275g: The Worlds of the Silk Road
    Rorlich

    T / Th

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    This course is designed for General Education credit in the category Cultures and Civilizations II.  It focuses on the exploration of economic exchanges and cultural interaction between Europe and Asia for some two millennia. We will embark together on a journey of discovery along the Silk Road, from China to Venice.

     

    What we will be exploring, however, is not one road, but a network of roads across Eurasia linking East and West, North, and South. This will be, in fact, a world history journey focusing on the history of human interaction across space and time, across ecological and civilizational boundaries.

     

    Since the Silk Road crossed the lands of the nomads as much as it linked the cities of the East with those of the West, this course will investigate the characteristics of the nomadic cultures of Eurasia and will address the issue of their interaction with urban cultures as diverse as those of China, Central Asia, the Middle East, the Black Sea and the Mediterranean basin. Even as trade is a crucial paradigm in this course, our investigation of the exchange of goods will be placed in a broad context of interaction whereby the links between economic exchange and socio- political transformations and religious, artistic developments will be thoroughly explored. We will accompany the Europeans who traveled the Silk Road and discover “the otherness” of non-European lands through their eyes, just as we will discover Europe’s “otherness” through the eyes of the Eurasians. The journey along the Silk Road will bring before our eyes  a “global world” that existed  long before the advent of the global economy of our own times , and will provide us with the opportunity  to discuss the impact of ”globalization” on  the identity of the individual.

     

  • Hist 365: The American Civil War

    Williams

    T / Th

    9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    This course covers the full scope of the U.S. Civil War. It reaches back to founding-era Constitutional debates over the place of slavery in a nation founded in principles of liberty and equality. It gestures forward to the way the War would come to be memorialized as a tragic “Lost Cause.” By applying critical legal theory--particularly that concerned with race and gender--to government responses to the domestic terrorism perpetrated by the Klu Klux Klan in the years that followed the official declaration of peace, it challenges the conventional wisdom of the war's end in 1865.  We foreground a cultural analysis of the emancipation era through a focus on law and popular culture. Consequently, although we address the unprecedented casualties and trauma of the first modern war, History 352 is not, generally speaking, concerned with traditional military history.

     

  • Hist 354: Mexican Migration to the United States

    Goodman

    M / W

    8:30-9:50am

    Course Description:

    Today some 34 million people of Mexican origin live in the United States, including more than 11 million immigrants. Mexicans represent the largest immigrant group in the country—making up 28% of all foreign-born people and 11% of the total population. This course explores the history of Mexican migration to the United States since the 19th century. It examines Mexican American community formation, while also recognizing continued migration from Mexico and return migration to Mexico, whether by choice or force. Students will learn about the diverse experiences of migrants and how migration has changed over time through a close examination of primary sources, in addition to works of history, ethnography, fiction, and film. We will explore Mexican migration, past and present, by covering, among other topics, the creation and militarization of the US-Mexico border; the Bracero Program; the history of undocumented migration; how Mexico shapes migration and how migration shapes Mexico; the impact of NAFTA on migration; deportation’s punitive turn since 1996 and the growth of the business of immigration enforcement; and the DREAM movement and transnational immigrant activism on both sides of the border. Ultimately, we will come to understand not only the history of Mexican migration, but also the interconnected histories of the United States and Mexico.

  • Hist 355: The African American Experience
    Wilson

    T / Th

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    This course provides an historical and social analysis of peoples of African descent in the United States from Colonial times to the present.  We will use primary and secondary sources, films, speakers, and the visual arts to explore black American history from 1619-to the present. 

     

  • Hist 358: U.S. Gay and Lesbian History

    Echols

    M / W

    8:30-9:50am

    Course Description:

    Exploration of shifting social organization and cultural meanings of same-sex desire and cross-gender behaviors in the U.S., primarily during the 20th century.

    •  Crosslist: This course is offered by the SWMS department but may qualify for major credit in HIST. To register, enroll in SWMS 358.

     

  • Hist 366: The People's Republic of China

    Goldstein

    T / Th

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    The class will cover People’s Republic of China history, beginning with the early history of the Chinese Communist Party (founded in 1921) and covering up to today’s regime under Xi Jinping.  The first four weeks of class will focus on familiarizing students with the main events of that history.  We will then read five of the most acclaimed recently published monographs of PRC history and discuss them in a seminar-style format with occasional lectures.

  • Hist 372: Modern Latin American History Seminar

    Becker

    T / Th

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Modern Latin American history invites students into lush, enthralling modern Latin American historical landscapes.  These places come to life in this class as we trace the complex and compelling ways Latin American women and men made independence from Spain and Portugal, and, responding to perceived injustices emerging from their post-colonial societies, developed rebellion, revolution, literary and visual art and dance.   The class focuses on four of Latin America's most highly significant countries (Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Chile.)  It also enabled students to focus on the compelling histories of Bolivia, Paraguay, Central America and Cuba.  Throughout the course, the connections between history, politics, literature, music, art and religion emerge because of the vivid ways that Latin Americans have experienced these themes.

     

  • Hist 373m:  History of the Mexican-American

    Chavez

    M / W

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Racial and cultural background of Mexico; immigration and conquest; the Mexican in California and the southwest; the rise of contemporary Mexican-American consciousness.

    • Crosslist: This course is offered by the AMST department but may qualify for major credit in HIST. To register, enroll in AMST 373.

     

  • Hist 389: Modern Iran

    TBD

       T / Th

     9:30-10:50am

    Course Description:

    History and culture of modern Iran from the nineteenth century to present through historical and ethnographic approaches to Iran today, richly contextualizing events and people.

    •  Crosslist: This course is offered by the MDES department but may qualify for major credit in HIST. To register, enroll in MDES 313.

     

  • Hist 393g:  Quantitative Historical Analysis

    Kurashige

     M / W / F

    11:00-11:50am

    Course Description:

    This class explores exciting approaches to understanding history that are rooted in the analysis of numerical data, statistics, and other forms of quantitative evidence.  What can numbers reveal about the past that standard historical texts cannot?  How can they be used in conjunction with such standard evidence to create a richer and better picture of events and processes?  And where do we begin to find and make sense of numerical data?  This course focuses on reading and doing quantitative research with historical data.  It covers research designs, appropriate statistical analysis, and useful software packages.  No math or statistical expertise is required. 

  • Hist 404:  Seminar in Korean History
    Hwang

    W

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    This seminar, for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, is designed to facilitate the pursuit of an individual research project in Korean history.  To ensure that everyone is familiar with the important events and themes, we will spend the first seven weeks of the course reading some of the important historical scholarship published over the past few years, in conjunction with an examination of a few primary sources that correspond to those secondary works.  

     

    This will provide a foundation for each student to develop thereafter an individual research project, based substantially on primary sources, that will culminate in a research paper of about 25 pages (double-spaced) for undergraduates and 30 pages for graduate students.  In consultation with the instructor, each student will choose a topic that is related to her or his interests or specialty and designed to further the student’s academic growth.  The research project will progress through several stages of written work, with the results of each stage—as well as the source materials--being presented to the rest of the class for feedback.

     

    The purpose of this approach is to cultivate your ability to plan, write, and revise research papers over several set stages. Just as important will be developing your skills in critically analyzing someone else's work, through which you can improve your method of devising and revising your own papers. This means that the proper functioning of this course depends on every student's participation in the feedback process.  Likewise, a substantial portion of your grade -- 30% -- will come from your contributions to this joint enterprise.

  • Hist 407: Europe in the 10th Century

    Glenn

    T

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    In 972 Maiolus, abbot of the great monastery of Cluny, was returning to the Frankish lands from Rome, where he had an audience with the pope. As he and his retinue traversed the Great Saint Bernard Pass, in the Alps, he was captured by Saracen pirates. These Arab Muslims ransomed him back to the monastery which was forced to sell some of its prized possessions to raise the 1000 pounds of silver demanded by his captors. A few years earlier, a German Roman emperor named Otto sent an Italian bishop, Liudprand of Cremona, on an embassy to the court of the Byzantine emperor; among other things, Liudprand was to request the hand of the Byzantine ruler's daughter for Otto's son. Liudprand was humiliated by and offended at the reception and customs of the Greeks he encountered in Constantinople. The emperor mistrusted him and viewed him as a dangerous heretic. Although the marriage was successfully arranged and did indeed take place, before the bishop had returned from the “rapacious, avaricious, and vainglorious” city, the two emperors were again at war. Half a century later, a queen of the Franks stood before a church in Orléans. She was trying to prevent a crowd of common folk from entering the church and killing the reputed heretics inside, a group of highly educated canons which included her former confessor. The heresy of these men, said to have been brought to Gaul by a woman from Italy, had been discovered and revealed by a Norman cleric who had gone under cover, infiltrated their group, and brought their practices to the attention of the king. On the king’s orders, these men were burned at the stake.

     

    This seminar uses these three events as points of departure for an exploration of the cultural landscape of Europe in the tenth century, conceived broadly as extending from the 880s through the 1030s. This period, perhaps the darkest of the so-called “Dark Ages”, represents a time of dynamic change in the social, economic, religious, intellectual, and political complexion of the lands stretching from England to North Africa and from Iberia to Byzantium. Students will work together with the instructor in an effort to make sense of these events and, perhaps more importantly, to develop from primary sources a picture of the larger contexts in which those events (and the larger cultural changes we detect) took place. This seminar therefore offers students an opportunity to do history rather than merely to study it.

     

    There are no prerequisites for this course, and students will find it relevant to any number of concentrations

    — students with questions about its applicability to their concentration should contact the instructor (jkglenn@usc.edu). In short, anyone prepared to work hard and participate in the seminar is welcome. But this is a demanding course, as it will require weekly readings of between 125 and 175 pages, most of which will be in primary sources. There will be regular writing assignments, usually not more than a paragraph.

     

  • Hist 415:  From Ivan the Terrible to Peter the Great: Medieval and Early Modern Russia
    Rorlich

    T / Th

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    This is a lecture course focusing on the study of the major developments in Russian political, social, economic, and cultural history from the ninth century to the reign of Peter the Great. It addresses the issue of the origin of the Russian state and raises some of the important questions concerning its formative period, the territorial consolidation of Muscovy, the growth of monarchical absolutism, and the beginning of empire building. While the issue of Russia’s “twin identity” as both a European power and a multinational Eurasian empire represents an important focus of this course, discussions will not be confined to issues of state identity; we will also investigate how political events shaped the identities of individual Russians and non-Russians alike. The aim of this course is to stay true to the medieval spirit by being broad! We will highlight the importance of political, social, economic, and cultural developments without privileging any; our goal is to identify those linkages that can facilitate a better understanding of the uniqueness of the canvas of Russian history. To this end,  a variety of primary sources will serve as guides for the discovery of the “voices” of the people who inhabited those centuries, just as secondary ones will facilitate a better understanding of how new approaches and methodologies affect the reevaluation of historical events.

     

    History 415 fulfills the requirements for an upper division 300-level history class; given its emphasis on discussions and written assignments, however, it may also satisfy the seminar requirements for History Majors.

     

  • Hist 425:  The Era of the First World War
    Accampo

    Th

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    No single event shaped the twentieth century more The Great War of 1914-1918. During its course, and in its wake, traditional empires and monarchies crumbled, the first communist state was born, and the seeds were sown for the rise of fascism, Nazism, the outbreak of the Second World War, and the Holocaust. In the midst of the one-hundredth anniversary of World War One, historians continue to grapple with its multiple dimensions and significance. This seminar will begin with a broad overview of the War, and then closely examine its causes, course, and impacts through multi-media primary and secondary sources, including art, poetry, film, fiction, memoirs, and war front correspondence. Weekly discussions will focus on interpretations of the war through these various media. Students will submit brief response papers each week. The first half of the course will focus on common readings. Some common readings will continue, but the second half of the course will focus more on individual research projects that will become the basis of a 12-15 page paper.

     

    Please note: this course will provide you with the opportunity to begin to develop a research topic for an honors thesis, if you are interested in applying for the History Department honors program. If so, you will have the opportunity to develop the research in this course further over the summer (very possibly with funding from resources such as SOAR, SURF or Foulke), and then write your thesis in HIST 492 in the fall.

     

  • Hist 440: Early Modern World History

    Sargeant

    M

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    Comparative patterns of historical change around the world, from ca. 1500 to ca. 1800.

     

  • Hist 442: The Ethics of Financial and Political Responsibility

    Soll       

    T / Th

    12:30-1:50pm

    Course Description:

    Examination of how kingdoms, empires and great companies have risen and fallen due to good or poor financial and political accountability.

     

  • Hist 446: Resistance to Genocide

    Gruner

    T / Th

    2:00-3:20pm

    Course Description:

    Attention: Former attendance of a class on Holocaust or Genocide is recommended.

     

    The research seminar is aimed to teach skills and methods of historical research via exploring a vital question for today’s world: What enables people to oppose or resist racist ideologies, state discrimination practices or the active participation in mass atrocities? The class will approach the question by studying the historical conditions first and then by individually developing research projects on resistance to Genocide, for example in Rwanda, Guatemala, Cambodia and during the Holocaust.

     

    While most research on genocide prevention has attempted to identify the ideological or political causes which led to the Holocaust and other genocides, and more recently, why people commit murder, the theme of the seminar -resistance- has rarely been addressed. When the topic has been discussed, it has been mostly restricted, as in the example of the Holocaust, to organized or armed group resistance by Jews, Poles or Germans, or, more recently, to rescue efforts for the victims. While there is literature on the Holocaust available, publications on the resistance in other Genocides are scarce.

     

    This class will systematically enquire why certain individuals or groups do not necessarily follow the path of mass violence, especially at an early stage of such developments. Which personal, psychological, social, political, ideological and/or economic factors support individuals to resist discrimination and violence? Tentatively, there will be the opportunity to address these questions in a discussion with a Jewish resistor, who survived the Holocaust.

     

    Thus, the aim of the seminar is to encourage student original research on resisters using the internationally unique resources available at USC, as the 52,000 audio visual testimonies of holocaust survivors at the Shoah Foundation Institute archive as well as testimonies from other genocides and the 14.000 volume strong Holocaust and Genocide Collection in Doheny. Depending on their projects, students shall conduct interviews in the Greater Los Angeles area which inhabits large genocide survivor communities of Cambodia, Guatemala and the Holocaust.

     

    *Capstone class for the interdisciplinary undergraduate minor “Resistance to Genocide”.

     

  • Hist 455: Advanced Topics in African-American History

    Ossei-Owusu

    Th

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    This class will examine African Americans’ and racial minorities’ interaction with the law during the 20th century. It begins with a discussion of Plessy v. Ferguson - the Supreme Court case which set the stage for African-American legal struggles in the 20th century.  We end the term with a discussion of the 2014 events in Ferguson and the protests that illuminated the nature and extent of African American legal progress since Plessy.  In the weeks between, we will move throughout the century, exploring and analyzing legal battles in arenas of health, criminal justice, housing, education, sports, and entertainment.  Course readings and materials will be drawn from articles, legal cases, primary sources, and documentaries. This class counts toward the Law, History, and Culture major and would be of interest to students interested pursuing further training in such fields as law, public policy, or graduate education in the humanities or social sciences.

    •  Restriction: Registration open to the following class level(s): Junior, Senior, Master Student, Doctoral Student
  • Hist 465: America in the Cold War, 1945-1991

    Collopy

    M

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    In this course, we’ll seek to understand how the United States and the Soviet Union developed a rivalry, and how that Cold War shaped American science, technology, media, popular culture, and family life at home and the engagement with the rest of the world abroad.

  • Hist 488: Teaching History in Secondary Schools

    Block

    M

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    Teaching History in the Secondary Schools is the required capstone seminar of the History and Social Science Education major. The course focuses on the ways in which historical research is brought into middle and high school curriculum. Seminar participants will examine textbooks and other materials designed for history instruction; engage in independent research; and write curriculum and/or classroom units or lesson plans. Participants will also become acquainted with the wide array of programs designed to support the teaching of history in schools both in California and nationally.

  • Hist 498: New World Orders? From Cold War to Contemporary Transatlantic Relations

    Sarotte

    M

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    The US, European states, and the USSR/Russia have all tried to instill order upon modern transatlantic and international relations.  This course critically examines their attempts to institute "new world orders" as the global Cold War unfolded, European empires gave way to European integration, and technology reshaped politics. It also explores the legacy of these events for international relations in the 1990s and the twenty-first century.

    *D-Clearance required for non-history majors.

  • Hist 498: History and Social Theory

    Goldtein

    Th

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    Advanced study in historical analysis and writing on selected topics and themes. Seminar enrollment limited to 15 students.

    Recommended preparation: HIST 201.

  • CLAS 499: The Hellenistic World on Stones and Papyri

    Fischer-Bovet

    T/Th

    11:00-12:20pm

    Course Description:

    What made the conquests of Alexander the Great possible and what was their impact on the eastern Mediterranean states and societies? The purpose of this class is to introduce the student to the history and culture of what is called the Hellenistic period, starting with the conquests led by Philippe and Alexander the Great, kings of Macedonia (4th c. BC) and ending with the death of Cleopatra VII and the annexation of Egypt by the Roman emperor-to-be, Augustus (30 BC). This course also offers a basic hands-on introduction to reading Greek inscriptions for students with no previous knowledge of ancient Greek (or of any other ancient language). The course will explore various issues connected to the new developments happening during this period: the expansion of the “Greek” world as far as present-day Afghanistan, India, and Sudan, the extension of trade within the Mediterranean and beyond, and the monetization of the market. It will also examine scientific, philosophical and literary achievements connected to the new intellectual capital, Alexandria, and its famous library. Finally, it will explore the interactions between the different social and ethnic groups within multi-ethnic societies: how did Greek and Egyptian religions and cultures coexist? Why did royal cults multiply at that time? How did Judaism develop in a Greek context?

     

    The main structure of the course follows a chronological and thematic outline. Starting with the rise of Macedonian imperialism and Alexander’s conquest of the Persian Empire, we will then proceed with our investigation of the kingdoms sharing the eastern Mediterranean and with our evaluation of the coming of Rome in the East. Issues will be discussed either in a comparative perspective or in an overarching way. The format of the course will depend on the size of the class. Ideally, each session will oscillate between more formal parts delivered by the instructor and more interactive units with discussions and group collaboration.

    *This class will count for upper-division History credit for SPRING 2016 ONLY*

  • SWMS 349: Women and the Law

    Williams

    T

    2:00-4:50pm

    Course Description:

    This course approaches the history of U.S. Women through the legal regulation of marriage, legitimacy, and family policy. The goal is to decenter the traditional narrative of women’s history, which focuses on organized social movements, usually defined through the writings and experiences of elite white women. (www.tinyurl.com/womenandthelaw)

     

    *This class will count for upper-division History credit for SPRING 2016 ONLY*

Commencement '14

Advising

Interested in a History Major or Minor?

The History Department has a dual advising system.  Melissa Borek, our Student Services Advisor, helps History students navigate the Department and University requirements.  Faculty advisors help students plan their major and offer guidance for pursuing the field of history both within and beyond USC.


To declare a major or address questions and issues concerning Dornsife College and University requirments or to have advising holds lifted, please see Melissa Borek, SOS 153, (213) 740-1659.


To discuss History Majors, Minors, the Honors Program, overseas studies, courses, funding, internships, honors societies, or careers, make an appointment or visit the Faculty Advisors during their weekly office hours.


SPRING 2016

Faculty Advising Schedule 


Professor Antaramian

SOS 174

Mondays| 12:00-2:00pm


Professor Halttunen

SOS 164

Tuesdays| 12:30-1:30pm

Thursdays| 12:30-1:30pm


Professor Hwang

SOS 279

Tuesdays| 1:00-2:00pm

Wednesdays| 1:00-2:00pm


Professor Kurashige

SOS 264

Mondays| 10:00-11:00am

Fridays| 12:30-2:30pm


Professor Rorlich:

SOS 258

Tuesdays| 11:00-12:00pm

Thursdays| 11:00-12:00pm


Professor Sheehan

SOS 173

Tuesdays| 11:00-12:00pm

Thursdays| 11:00-12:00pm


For more information, contact Professor Lon Kurashige, Director of Undergraduate Studies, SOS 264, (213) 740-1666.

  • Department of History
  • 3502 Trousdale Parkway
  • Social Sciences Building (SOS) 153
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 90089-0034