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February 2013 Media Mentions

 

Thursday, February 28, 2013

The Hollywood Reporter highlighted the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education’s IWitness Video Challenge. The event encourages middle and high school students to honor the legacy of “Schindler’s List” through community service, capturing their work in a short video essay. Since its founding by director Steven Spielberg in 1994, the institute has compiled nearly 52,000 testimonies from Holocaust survivors. “I set out to use this archive to teach tolerance in schools all over this world,” Spielberg told Entertainment Tonight. “We want this to be very accessible to students.” The creator of the most impactful video will present it as part of the institute’s 20th anniversary. The story was also covered by Extra and Monsters and Critics.

 

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Europa Press (Spain) reported that Andrew Smith of biological sciences and USC Dornsife graduate student Timothy Daley have developed an algorithm to determine the value of a DNA sequence before it’s conducted. Clinical applications for DNA sequencing will likely become routine within the next five to 10 years, Smith said. The story noted that in 1988 Michael Waterman, University Professor, USC Associates Chair in Natural Sciences and professor of biological sciences, computer science and mathematics, provided a mathematical solution that furthered the development of human genome sequencing.

 

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Los Angeles Times featured “Just Food and Fair Food: A Multidisciplinary Exploration,” an upcoming event hosted by Visions and Voices: The USC Arts & Humanities Initiative. The free, public event will include a food bazaar and a panel on access to nutritious food in low-income communities. Speakers will include Sarah Portnoy of  Spanish and Portuguese, who teaches Latino culinary culture in Los Angeles.

RedOrbit reported that Andrew Smith of biological sciences and USC Dornsife graduate student Timothy Daley have developed an algorithm to determine the value of a DNA sequence before it’s conducted. The algorithm also has broad applications outside of genetic sequencing: It can be used to predict other unknowns based on small samples of data. Public health officials could use the algorithm to predict the population of AIDS-positive patients, and astronomers could predict the number of exoplanets based on the number already discovered and categorized.

Singularity Hub covered a study by David McKemy of neurobiology and colleagues, which deactivated select neurons in an animal model to produce insensitivity to cold temperatures.

NPR News San Francisco affiliate KALW-FM mentioned the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and its connection to founder Steven Spielberg’s film “Schindler’s List.”

 

February 23 to 25, 2013

The New York Times highlighted an amicus curiae brief by Jane Junn of political science and colleagues, finding a disparity in voting rights between states covered by Section Five of the Voting Rights Act and the rest of the country. MSNBC also cited the brief, noting that it found “clear and statistically significant evidence” that racial discrimination is still widespread in many states. The story was also covered by SCOTUSblog.

The Boston Globe highlighted research by USC Dornsife Dean Steve A. Kay on circadian rhythms. Kay’s lab is researching a drug with the potential to reverse obesity by preventing a rise in blood sugar.

CNN interviewed David Kang of international relations and business, director of the Korean Studies Institute, about the changing gender roles exemplified by South Korea’s election of its first female president, Park Geun-hye.

Los Angeles Times mentioned that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, moderated a debate among the L.A. mayoral candidates.

 

Wednesday, February 22, 2013

The Guardian Express quoted Gabriela Zapata of Spanish about Santeria, noting that she has studied Santeria rituals and will take students to study in Cuba this summer.

The Californian cited a study by USC’s Center for Immigrant Integration finding that the costs associated with becoming a U.S. citizen hinder the integration of working-class immigrants. Univision San Diego affiliate KBNT-CA also covered the study.

The Tribune mentioned an education reform panel hosted by the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics in USC Dornsife. KSCI-TV also covered the event.

Science 2.0 covered research by Nicos Petasis, Harold and Lillian Moulton Chair in Chemistry and professor of chemistry and pharmacology, and colleagues on how aspirin and omega-3 fatty acids work together to fight inflammation. Healthline also covered the work.

CW News Los Angeles affiliate KTLA-TV highlighted the community work of Cecil “Chip” Murray, John R. Tansey Chair in Christian Ethics and professor of religion.

 

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Los Angeles Times covered an education reform panel hosted by the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics in USC Dornsife. KPCC-FM reported that the panel included Michelle Rhee, CEO of StudentsFirst and former Washington, D.C., schools chancellor. Roughly 120 people attended the event, which addressed the future of California’s K-12 educational system.

Foreign Affairs ran an op-ed by Jacques Hymans of international relations about response to Iran’s nuclear program.

Asian News International featured research by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues on northeast African vegetation change over 12 million years. The study suggests that rainforests disappeared long before bipedalism developed in human ancestors, which is sooner than previously believed.

KPCC-FM mentioned that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, will moderate an upcoming forum with the Los Angeles mayoral candidates.

KCET-TV mentioned “A People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Pulido of American studies and ethnicity in a story by USC Annenberg School graduate student George Villanueva.

 

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

KPCC-FM featured research by Valter Longo of gerontology and biological sciences and USC Davis School Dean Pinchas Cohen finding that a low-protein diet appears to slow Alzheimer’s disease. The work was also covered by Panorama (Italy), Latinos Post and RedOrbit.

Bloomberg News highlighted a book by Lee Epstein, Provost Professor of Law and Political Science, and colleagues that analyzes the votes of U.S. Supreme Court justices going back to 1937. Out of six of the most conservative justices, no fewer than three are part of the current court.

Inside Higher Ed featured Jan Amend of earth sciences and biological sciences, who studies microbes that live deep below the surface of the earth.

Time quoted William Deverell of history about people who may have sympathized with former police officer Christopher Dorner.

Gizmag covered a study by David McKemy of neurobiology and colleagues, which deactivated select neurons in an animal model to produce insensitivity to cold temperatures. The research was also covered by ScienceDaily.

 

February 16 to 19, 2013

Popular Science featured a study by David McKemy of biological sciences and colleagues, which deactivated select neurons in an animal model to produce insensitivity to cold temperatures. This research could lead to more effective pain medications, the story stated.

The New York Times quoted Manuel Pastor of sociology and American studies and ethnicity on how immigration is viewed in California.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about a trend in California statewide politicians moving from Sacramento to Los Angeles.

Contra Costa Times quoted David Treuer of English about the racial implications of the word “squaw.”

The New York Times reported that Clifford Johnson of physics and astronomy will discuss the physics of time travel after a screening of the film “Primer.”

La Opinion cited a study by USC’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration finding that naturalization could vastly increase the incomes of American immigrants, leading to higher purchasing power and ultimately a boost to the GDP.

O.C. Weekly covered a lecture by Jody Agius Vallejo of sociology on immigration and the Mexican-American middle class.

 

Friday, February 15, 2013

La Opinion featured a study by USC’s Center for Immigrant Integration (CSII) finding that the costs associated with becoming a U.S. citizen hinder the integration of working-class immigrants. Manuel Pastor of sociology and American studies and ethnicity, and co-director of CSII, said that while government studies have denied a relationship between the costs of citizenship and rates of naturalization, those studies don’t distinguish between citizenship and other optional benefits. The work was also covered by EFE (Spain), La Tribuna de Toledo (Spain), The Seattle Times, Univision Los Angeles affiliate KMEX-DT, National Journal and KPCC-FM.

Smithsonian featured a study by David McKemy of biological sciences and colleagues, which deactivated select neurons in an animal model to produce insensitivity to cold temperatures. The researchers said that the work could lead to new pain treatments in humans. The study was also covered by Europa Press (Spain), NU (Netherlands), National Monitor, NBC News Salt Lake City affiliate KSL-TV, RTT News and Geekosystem.

The Jerusalem Post (Israel) featured holograms of Holocaust survivors developed by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and USC’s Institute of Creative Technologies. The holographic virtual survivors will allow future generations to ask questions and learn their stories.

The Washington Post, in a Religion News Service story, quoted James Heft, Alton M. Brooks Professor of Religion, about retired Cardinal Roger Mahony’s vote in the upcoming papal conclave.

Northwest Public Radio reviewed the novel “Percival Everett by Virgil Russell” by Percival Everett, Distinguished Professor of English.

 

Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Economist featured research by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences and colleagues on northeast African vegetation change over 12 million years. The study suggests that rainforests disappeared long before bipedalism developed in human ancestors, which is sooner than previously believed.

Arte (France) interviewed Jody Agius Vallejo of sociology about immigration reform.

Scientific American covered the USC Science Film competition, an annual event in which science and film students team up to produce short films illustrating basic scientific ideas. Clifford Johnson of physics and astronomy is one of the organizers of the competition, the story noted.

 

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

U.S. News & World Report featured a study by David McKemy of biological sciences and colleagues, which deactivated select neurons in an animal model to produce insensitivity to cold temperatures. Los Angeles Times stated that the research could lead to new treatments for pain in humans. The research was also covered by ABC (Spain), La Stampa (Italy), Ciencia Hoje (Portugal), The Star-Ledger, ABC Radio and RedOrbit.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg donating $1 million to help preserve a Los Angeles Board of Education majority.

 

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Los Angeles Times reviewed the novel “Percival Everett by Virgil Russell” by Percival Everett, Distinguished Professor of English.

CNET featured GLIMPSE, a showcase of USC digital technology held at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. The story highlighted work by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and USC’s Institute for Creative Technologies, which are using digital imaging to create interactive holographic projections of Holocaust survivors. The holograms can respond to questions, thanks to language technology developed by David Traum of the institute. The story noted that Stephen Smith, executive director of the USC Shoah Foundation Institute, will likely interview more survivors for the project. The work was also covered by The Verge and SlashGear.

CBC News (Canada) featured a study by Sarah Feakins of earth sciences on how and when bipedalism developed in human ancestors. By looking at the sediment core of plant leaf waxes and pollen, Feakins determined that the encroachment of grasslands on the forests of northeast Africa happened earlier than the period when humans are estimated to have become bipedal.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about Sen. Marco Rubio’s expected response to the State of the Union address.

Politic365 quoted Jody Agius Vallejo of sociology on whether Latino voters could be drawn to the Republican Party.

Le Monde (France) highlighted research by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, assistant professor of psychology at USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, about emotions.

Los Angeles Daily News reported that Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, will moderate a forum for Burbank City Council candidates.

 

February 9 to 11, 2013

La Opinion featured a conference hosted by the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at USC that encouraged girls to seek leadership positions in politics. Andrenna Hidalgo of the USC Dornsife College said that workshops were offered to help young women learn public speaking and fundraising skills. She added that this year, scholarships were provided to help low-income youth to attend the event.

The Wall Street Journal quoted Jody Agius Vallejo of sociology about social mobility among Latino immigrant families.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the Los Angeles mayoral debates.

CW News Los Angeles affiliate KTLA-TV interviewed James Heft, Alton M. Brooks Professor of Religion, about Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation. Heft was also interviewed by CBS Radio Los Angeles affiliate KNX-AM.

 

Friday, February 8, 2013

The Wall Street Journal ran an op-ed by Nick Street, senior writer at the Center for Religion and Civic Culture in USC Dornsife, about the history of Pentecostalism in Los Angeles.

The Wall Street Journal quoted Jody Agius Vallejo of sociology about social mobility among Latinos.

Vanity Fair quoted Selma Holo of art history, director of the USC Fisher Museum of Art in a story about the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art.

 

Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Week featured GLIMPSE, a showcase of USC digital technology held last week at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. The story highlighted holograms of Holocaust survivors developed by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and USCís Institute of Creative Technologies. The holographic virtual survivors will allow future generations to ask questions and learn their stories. In the next one to five years, the holograms could be set up at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

 

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Discovery News covered GLIMPSE, a showcase of USC digital technology held last week at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. The story highlighted work by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education and USC's Institute for Creative Technologies, which are using digital imaging to create interactive holographic projections of Holocaust survivors. Future generations of students will be able to ask these three-dimensional virtual survivors questions and learn more about their personal experiences. The work was also covered by Fast Company, Newser and TechNewsDaily.

The New York Times cited the Easterlin Paradox, a finding by Richard Easterlin, University Professor and professor of economics, that people don't become happier as they get richer.

 

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Maclean's (Canada) highlighted research by Richard Easterlin, University Professor and professor of economics, finding that life satisfaction among Chinese citizens declined between 1990 and the mid-'00s. The study found that the loss of social safety nets and income inequality drove much of that dissatisfaction. The evidence is that the rich-poor gap in life satisfaction in China is quite high relative to most countries, Easterlin said.

 

February 2 to 4, 2013

The Washington Post, in an Associated Press story, covered GLIMPSE, a showcase of USC digital technology held last week at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. The story highlighted work by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for History and Education, which is using digital imaging to create interactive holographic projections of Holocaust survivors.

Los Angeles Times reported that President Barack Obama presented Solomon Golomb, University and Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics, with the National Medal of Science this past Friday.  The news was also covered by CBS News and Santa Cruz Sentinel.

The New York Times highlighted a study co-authored by Antonio Damasio, director of USC's Brain and Creativity Institute, about a woman who feels no fear due to a malfunctioning amygdala. A separate study recently found that the woman could experience panic under certain circumstances, confirming a theory in a 2011 study Damasio co-authored.

KPCC-FM featured a conference at USC on human trafficking. “Human trafficking is an extensive problem that many people talk about but they actually know very little about it,” said Rhacel Salazar Parrenas of sociology. The event brought together academics, social workers and government officials to discuss the issue.

Los Angeles Times quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about the credibility that firefighter and police support can give a politician.

The Sacramento Bee quoted Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, about California Republicans taking on the issue of education.