Event Calendar

Print this page
BODYTRAFFIC and the Work of Barak Marshall

BODYTRAFFIC and the Work of Barak Marshall

Visions and Voices

  • Date:
    Thursday, March 27, 2014
  • Time:
    7:00 PM
  • Campus:
    University Park Campus
  • Venue:
    Bovard Auditorium (ADM)
  • Cost:
    Admission is free. Reservations required.

    RSVP at the links below beginning Tuesday, March 4, at 9 a.m.

    USC Students, Staff and Faculty: To RSVP, click here.
    General Public: To RSVP, click here.

Summary:

Los Angeles dance company BODYTRAFFIC will present the work of innovative Israeli choreographer Barak Marshall in an inspiring performance. Marshall’s work has been described as possessing “a formidable joie de vivre, an enchantment, which pulls us into a magical world.”

Description:

In a unique and inspiring collaboration, Los Angeles–based dance company BODYTRAFFIC will present the award-winning choreography of Barak Marshall, one of Israeli dance’s most innovative and unique voices. “Marshall’s work possesses a formidable joie de vivre, an enchantment, which pulls us into a magical world,” wrote La Republique. The first-ever house choreographer of the Tel Aviv–based Batsheva Dance Company, Marshall has performed and won awards in venues all over the world, including the Bagnolet International Choreographic Competition and the Théâtre de la Bastille in Paris, the Bienale de la danse in Lyon, the House of World Cultures in Berlin, Dance Umbrella UK and Los Angeles’s Disney Hall. BODYTRAFFIC, a nonprofit company with a mission to bring world-class contemporary dance to Los Angeles while supporting and fostering Jewish art, was named one of Dance magazine’s “25 to Watch” in 2013. BODYTRAFFIC, in collaboration with Marshall, won first prize at The A.W.A.R.D. Show in 2011. In September 2012, they made their Walt Disney Concert Hall debut together at the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s opening-night gala performance.

Organized by Ruth Weisberg (Art and Design). Co-sponsored by the USC Initiative for Israeli Arts and Humanities.

Photo: Christopher Duggan