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"When Foreign Policy Commitments Go Sour"

"When Foreign Policy Commitments Go Sour"

CIS Seminar Series

  • Date:
    Wednesday, March 6, 2013
  • Time:
    12:30 PM to 2:00 PM
  • Campus:
    University Park Campus
  • Venue:
    Social Sciences Building (SOS)
  • Room:
    B40
  • Cost:
    Free
  • Phone:
    213-740-9605
  • Email:

Summary:

Charles Hermann from Texas A&M University explores the following question: how do decision-makers respond to strong indications that a foreign policy undertaking to which they are strongly committed is failing?

Description:

The discussant for this seminar is Eric Hamilton, Political Science and International Relations PhD candidate, USC. 

ABSTRACT: 

How do decision-makers respond to strong indications that a foreign policy undertaking to which they are strongly committed is failing? This recurrent and consequential human dilemma has triggered study in multiple fields applying different theories. In this presentation the problem is explored using Lyndon Johnson’s response to Vietnam and Ariel Sharon’s to settlements in Gaza and the West Bank.

BIO:

Dr. Charles Hermann has been with the Bush School at Texas A&M University since its inception in 1995, serving as the interim associate dean for academic programs and associate dean before his appointment as the program director for the Master's Program in International Affairs. An active scholar in the fields of foreign policy, national security policy, and group decision making, his publications include the editorship of The American Defense Annual and New Directions in Foreign Policy. In 1969, he left a position at Princeton University to serve on the National Security Council staff under Dr. Henry Kissinger, has previously served as the director of the Mershon Center, a think-tank on international security and public policy at Ohio State University, and is a past president of the International Studies Association. Dr. Hermann received his PhD in political science from Northwestern University.

More on Hermann: http://bush.tamu.edu/faculty/chermann/