Haunting Religion

Haunting Religion

  • Date:
    Wednesday, March 13, 2013
  • Time:
    12:00 PM to 1:45 PM
  • Campus:
    University Park Campus
  • Venue:
    Social Sciences Building (SOS)
  • Room:
    250
  • Phone:
    (213)740-8562

Summary:

The seminar features papers by Brad Christerson and Richard Flory on spiritual warfare in the context of the new Pentecostalism, and Ann Schofield on mourning the dead in 19th century America. 

Description:

The event is sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Research Group of Center for Religion and Civic Culture and the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Brad Christerson, associate professor of sociology at Biola University presents a paper with Richard Flory on "Revolution from Above: Spiritual Warfare, Territorial Spirits, and Social Transformation in the new Pentecostalism."  Prof. Christerson has written extensively in the areas of religion, race, ethnicity, and globalization. He is co-author of Growing Up in America: The Power of Race in the Lives of Teens (Stanford University Press, 2010) and Against All Odds: The Struggle of Racial Integration in Religious Organizations (2005, New York University Press).

Richard Flory is associate research professor of sociology and director of research in the Center for Religion and Civic Culture and at the University of Southern California. He is the author and/or editor of four books, including Spirit and Power: The Growth and Global Impact of Pentecostalism (Oxford University Press, forthcoming) and Growing up in America: The Power of Race in the Lives of Teens (Stanford University Press, 2010), 

Ann Schofield is professor of American studies at the University of Kansas. Schofield's lecture is titled, "Mourning the Dead, Haunting the Living: a Cultural Conundrum in Nineteenth Century America." Her research focuses mainly on U.S. women’s history, she has recently published To do and to be: Portraits of Four Women Activists, a collective biography of women activists in labor reform.

Haunting Religion is organized by Lisa Bitel, professor of history and religion and Lynn Swartz Dodd, director of the Archaeology Research Center at USC. The seminars focus on religious conceptions of, and responses to, the dead, the paranormal, the supernatural, and the otherworldly. 

The event is open to the public, but please reserve your seat via this link: http://bit.ly/YaurRo
  • Troy Gunderson
  • USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies
  • University of Southern California
  • University Park Campus
  • AHF 108
  • Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371