The Dog and Pony Show (Bring Your Own Pony)

Visions and Voices

Over the past 30 years, feminist lesbian performance artist Holly Hughes has influenced a generation of artists and scholars with her provocative performances. She will performThe Dog and Pony Show (Bring Your Own Pony), a poignant and hilarious look at identity and politics with insights on aging, community and belonging.

Over the past 30 years, feminist lesbian performance artist Holly Hughes has influenced a generation of artists and scholars with her provocative performances. She will perform The Dog and Pony Show (Bring Your Own Pony), her first full-length solo piece in ten years, in which she poignantly and hilariously pairs incisive commentary on identity and politics with insights on aging, community and belonging. Written and performed by Hughes and directed by Dan Hurlin, the show offers a touching and comical look at the nature of relationships and intimacy through a loosely linked series of autobiographical narratives, the subject matter of which ranges from the legacy of feminism to the unique characters found at a Michigan dog show. The performance will be followed by a Q&A moderated by professor David Román.
 
Since she began performing at the New York City women’s art cooperative the WOW Café in the early 1980s, Holly Hughes has established herself as one of the most important figures in feminist performance. She has written and performed such plays as The Well of Horniness and Let Them Eat Cake and the solo shows Clit Notes and Preaching to the Perverted. She has received grants from the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the New York State Council and the Guggenheim Foundation, among others, and has won a Lambda Book Award as well as two OBIE Awards. Hughes’s innovative work in both solo and group performance has been foundational for performance artists and for performance studies as an academic field.

Related Event:
 
Autobiographical Performance Workshop with Holly Hughes
Friday, February 22, 2 to 4 p.m.
Friends of the USC Libraries Lecture Hall, Doheny Memorial Library 240
For more info, click here.
 
Organized by David Román (English and American Studies and Ethnicity).

Photo: Lisa Guido