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Daniel HoSang
  • Daniel HoSang American Studies and Ethnicity Ph.D.

Daniel HoSang

Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies and Political Science at the University of Oregon

I entered the PhD Program in American Studies and Ethnicity (ASE) at Dornsife College in 2002, a year after it was started. My tenure at USC exceeded all expectations. I found a wide-ranging intellectual community that was committed not only to rigorous scholarship and analysis but also a deep engagement with broader worlds and broader communities. I found superb faculty who placed the highest priority on graduate student mentorship, and took a genuine interest in the lives and interests of students. I found a cohort of graduate students with broad concerns and commitments--theater, community history, union organizing, African American literature-- and who were equally excited to be a part of such an energized program. 

The ASE PhD program provided the ideal setting for my interests in California race politics and the rise of racial colorblindness in the 20th century. I drew on faculty in ASE as well as Political Science, Law, Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology during my research.

I now work as an Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies and Political Science at the University of Oregon. Since leaving Dornsife College, I've come to appreciate even more the remarkable mentorship and support which ASE provided, and I continue to collaborate with former colleagues at USC. In 2010, the University of California Press will publish my book, Racial Propositions: Genteel Apartheid in Postwar California, based on the dissertation I wrote in ASE. 

 

I entered the PhD Program in American Studies and Ethnicity (ASE) at USC in
2002, a year after it was started. My tenure at USC exceeded all
expectations. I found a wide-ranging intellectual community that was
committed not only to rigorous scholarship and analysis but also a deep
engagement with broader worlds and broader communities. I found superb
faculty who placed the highest priority on graduate student mentorship, and
took a genuine interest in the lives and interests of students. I found a
cohort of graduate students with broad concerns and commitments--theater,
community history, union organizing, African American literature-- and who
were equally excited to be a part of such an energized program. 
The ASE PhD program provided the ideal setting for my interests in
California race politics and the rise of racial colorblindness in the 20th
century. I drew on faculty in ASE as well as Political Science, Law,
Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology during my research.
I now work as an Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies and Political Science
at the University of Oregon. Since leaving USC, I've come to appreciate even
more the remarkable mentorship and support which ASE provided, and I
continue to collaborate with former colleagues at USC. In 2010, the
University of California Press will publish my book, Racial Propositions:
Genteel Apartheid in Postwar California, based on the dissertation I wrote
in ASE.