Study Sessions

Study Sessions at the Getty and Huntington

Please email NAVSA2013@gmail.com to sign up for curator-led Study Sessions, which will provide participants with the opportunity to study objects first-hand in dialogue with curators.  Study Sessions are open to all NAVSA participants and registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Transportation to and from Study Sessions at the Getty will be provided on Wednesday, October 23.  Transportation to and from the Study Sessions at the Huntington will be provided Friday, October 25. You may sign up for transportation on the Registration page, and NAVSA participants are free to arrange their own transportation to either institution at any time.

Wednesday, October 23: The Getty Museum

Getty Session Schedule

2:30pm-3:30pm

  • Session A: J. Paul Getty Museum Photography Collection [max 20 participants]. Led by curator Karen Hellman.  Objects will be selected that illustrate the medium from its earliest incarnation in calotypes and daguerreotypes to its later expression in evocative portraits by such figures as Juliet Margaret Cameron or landscape photographs illuminating sites critical to Britain’s imperial expansion. Meeting Point: Getty Museum Rotunda, adjacent to the information desk.

2:15pm-3:15pm

  • Session B: [CANCELLED]

3:40pm-4:40pm

  • Session C: Getty Research Institute Special Collections [max 25 participants]. Led by Sally McKay, head of special collections, in collaboration with various curators from the GRI. Objects selected will introduce scholars to particular collecting strengths of the Getty Research Institute, including world's fairs, documentary photography, and "devices of wonder" that feature innovative visual technologies.  Meeting point:  Getty Research Institute lobby.

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Friday, October 25: The Huntington Library

 Huntington Session Schedule (see session descriptions below)

10:45am-12:00pm

  • [Please note—this session is now full] Session A: “‘Who’s Right and Who’s Wrong?’ The Evolution/Creation Debates in Victorian England” [max 15 participants]
  • [Please note—this session is now full] Session B: “Evidence of Process: William Morris and Nineteenth-Century British Design” [max 20 participants]

12:30pm-1:45pm

  • [Please note—this session is now full] Session C: “Evidence of Process: William Morris and Nineteenth-Century British Design” [max 20 participants]

1:30pm-2:45pm

  • Session D: “The Shade of Things to Come: Color Dictionaries in Victorian and American Culture and Science” [max 15 participants]

 

Session A: “Who’s Right and Who’s Wrong?” The Evolution/Creation Debates in Victorian England

Led by Dan Lewis

Darwin’s new theory of evolution in 1859 stood Victorian science on its head. Print culture was critical to the dissemination of Darwin’s theories and stimulating public debate.  It was praised, reviled, and argued against, in private and in print. We will take 45 minutes to talk about these works, and their role in transforming Victorian science. We’ll take another 45 minutes to tour “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World,” a permanent Huntington exhibit that features a significant collection of relevant works.

Sessions B & C (Session runs twice): Evidence of Process: William Morris and Nineteenth-Century British Design

Led by Catherine Hess and Melinda McCurdy

This object-based session will focus on the designs of William Morris and his contemporaries as material evidence of the aesthetic and social philosophies of late 19th-century Britain, providing participants with an opportunity to see rarely exhibited material up close. The session will examine and discuss selections from The Huntington’s holdings of Morris & Co. designs in the Art Collections Print Room before walking to the Huntington Art Gallery to view examples of finished Arts & Crafts on display.

Session D: The Shade of Things to Come: Color Dictionaries in Victorian and American Culture and Science

Led by Dan Lewis

Color dictionaries served as a vital means of quantifying a slippery subject: what a specific color was, and what was meant by calling something, say, “Dragon’s Blood Red,” or “Rood’s Blue.” These dictionaries arose in the 1830s in England, France and America, and continued on through the century as key works in defining color in quantifiable terms that intersected with new discoveries in optics. We’ll examine some specific color dictionaries in person as well, and have a chance to handle several of these sometimes-strange and illuminating works.